• A suite measurements of the electrical, thermal, and vibrational properties are conducted on palladium sulfide (PdS) in order to investigate its thermoelectric performance. The tetragonal structure with the space group $P$42/$m$ for PdS is determined from X-ray diffraction measurement. The unique temperature dependence of mobility suggests that acoustic phonons and ion impurity scattering are two dominant scattering mechanisms within the compound. The obtained power factor of $27$ $\mu$Wcm$^{-1}$K$^{-2}$ at 800 K is the largest value in the remaining transition-metal sulfides studied so far. The maximum value of the dimensionless figure of merit is 0.33 at 800 K. The observed phonon softening with temperature indicates that the reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity is mainly controlled by the enhanced lattice anharmonicity. These results indicate that the binary bulk PdS has promising potential to have good thermoelectrical performance.
  • An extended study on PdS is carried out with the measurements of the resistivity, Hall coefficient, Raman scattering, and X-ray diffraction at high pressures up to 42.3 GPa. With increasing pressure, superconductivity is observed accompanying with a structural phase transition at around 19.5 GPa. The coexistence of semiconducting and metallic phases observed at normal state is examined by the Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction between 19.5 and 29.5 GPa. After that, only the metallic normal state maintains with an almost constant superconducting transition temperature. The similar evolution between the superconducting transition temperature and carrier concentration with pressure supports the phonon-mediated superconductivity in this material. These results highlight the important role of pressure played in inducing superconductivity from these narrow band-gap semiconductors.
  • LS I +61${^\circ}$303 is a $\gamma$-ray emitting X-ray binary with periodic radio outbursts with time scales of one month. Previous observations have revealed microflares superimposed on these large outbursts with periods ranging from a few minutes to hours. This makes LS I +61${^\circ}$303, along with Cyg X-1, the only TeV emitting X-ray binary exhibiting radio microflares. To further investigate these microflaring activity in LS I +61${^\circ}$303 we observed the source with the 100-m Effelsberg radio telescope at 4.85, 8.35, and 10.45 GHz and performed timing analysis on the obtained data. Radio oscillations of 15 hours time scales are detected at all three frequencies. We also compare the spectral index evolution of radio data to that of the photon index of GeV data observed by Fermi-LAT. We conclude that the observed QPO could result from multiple shocks in a jet.
  • Thermoelectric (TE) materials achieve localised conversion between thermal and electric energies, and the conversion efficiency is determined by a figure of merit zT. Up to date, two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) related TE materials hold the records for zT near room-temperature. A sharp increase in zT up to ~2.0 was observed previously for superlattice materials such as PbSeTe, Bi2Te3/Sb2Te3 and SrNb0.2Ti0.8O3/SrTiO3, when the thicknesses of these TE materials were spatially confine within sub-nanometre scale. The two-dimensional confinement of carriers enlarges the density of states near the Fermi energy3-6 and triggers electron phonon coupling. This overcomes the conventional {\sigma}-S trade-off to more independently improve S, and thereby further increases thermoelectric power factors (PF=S2{\sigma}). Nevertheless, practical applications of the present 2DEG materials for high power energy conversions are impeded by the prerequisite of spatial confinement, as the amount of TE material is insufficient. Here, we report similar TE properties to 2DEGs but achieved in SrNb0.2Ti0.8O3 films with thickness within sub-micrometer scale by regulating interfacial and lattice polarizations. High power factor (up to 103 {\mu}Wcm-1K-2) and zT value (up to 1.6) were observed for the film materials near room-temperature and below. Even reckon in the thickness of the substrate, an integrated power factor of both film and substrate approaching to be 102 {\mu}Wcm-1K-2 was achieved in a 2 {\mu}m-thick SrNb0.2Ti0.8O3 film grown on a 100 {\mu}m-thick SrTiO3 substrate. The dependence of high TE performances on size-confinement is reduced by ~103 compared to the conventional 2DEG-related TE materials. As-grown oxide films are less toxic and not dependent on large amounts of heavy elements, potentially paving the way towards applications in localised refrigeration and electric power generations.
  • We performed angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies on a series of FeTe$_{1-x}$Se$_{x}$ monolayer films grown on SrTiO$_{3}$. The superconductivity of the films is robust and rather insensitive to the variations of the band position and effective mass caused by the substitution of Se by Te. However, the band gap between the electron- and hole-like bands at the Brillouin zone center decreases towards band inversion and parity exchange, which drive the system to a nontrivial topological state predicted by theoretical calculations. Our results provide a clear experimental indication that the FeTe$_{1-x}$Se$_{x}$ monolayer materials are high-temperature connate topological superconductors in which band topology and superconductivity are integrated intrinsically.
  • Accretion shocks around galaxy clusters mark the position where the infalling diffuse gas is significantly slowed down, heated up, and becomes a part of the intracluster medium (ICM). They play an important role in setting the ICM properties. Hydrodynamical simulations have found an intriguing result that the radial position of this accretion shock tracks closely the position of the `splashback radius' of the dark matter, despite the very different physical processes that gas and dark matter experience. Using the self-similar spherical collapse model for dark matter and gas, we find that an alignment between the two radii happens only for a gas with an adiabatic index of $\gamma \approx 5/3$ and for clusters with moderate mass accretion rates. In addition, we find that some observed ICM properties, such as the entropy slope and the effective polytropic index lying around $\sim 1.1-1.2$, are captured by the self-similar spherical collapse model, and are insensitive to the mass accretion history.
  • A steepening feature in the outer density profiles of dark matter halos indicating the splashback radius has drawn much attention recently. Possible observational detections have even been made for galaxy clusters. Theoretically, Adhikari et al. have estimated the location of the splashback radius by computing the secondary infall trajectory of a dark matter shell through a growing dark matter halo with an NFW profile. However, since they imposed a shape of the halo profile rather than computing it consistently from the trajectories of the dark matter shells, they could not provide the full shape of the dark matter profile around the splashback radius. We improve on this by extending the self-similar spherical collapse model of Fillmore \& Goldreich to a $\Lambda$CDM universe. This allows us to compute the dark matter halo profile and the trajectories simultaneously from the mass accretion history. Our results on the splashback location agree qualitatively with Adhikari et al. but with small quantitative differences at large mass accretion rates. We present new fitting formulae for the splashback radius $R_{\rm sp}$ in various forms, including the ratios of $R_{\rm sp} / R_{\rm 200c}$ and $R_{\rm sp} / R_{\rm 200m}$. Numerical simulations have made the puzzling discovery that the splashback radius scales well with $R_{\rm 200m}$ but not with $R_{\rm 200c}$. We trace the origin of this to be the correlated increase of $\Omega_{\rm m}$ and the average halo mass accretion rate with an increasing redshift.
  • Non-thermal pressure in galaxy clusters leads to underestimation of the mass of galaxy clusters based on hydrostatic equilibrium with thermal gas pressure. This occurs even for dynamically relaxed clusters that are used for calibrating the mass-observable scaling relations. We show that the analytical model for non-thermal pressure developed in Shi & Komatsu 2014 can correct for this so-called 'hydrostatic mass bias', if most of the non-thermal pressure comes from bulk and turbulent motions of gas in the intracluster medium. Our correction works for the sample average irrespective of the mass estimation method, or the dynamical state of the clusters. This makes it possible to correct for the bias in the hydrostatic mass estimates from X-ray surface brightness and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich observations that will be available for clusters in a wide range of redshifts and dynamical states.
  • Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) have been investigated on single crystal samples of KFe2As2. A van Hove singularity (vHs) has been directly observed just a few meV below the Fermi level E_F of superconducting KFe2As2, which locates in the middle of the principle axes of the first Brillouin zone. The majority of the density-of-states at E_F, mainly contributed by the proximity effect of the saddle point to E_F, is non-gapped in the superconducting state. Our observation of nodal behavior of the momentum area close to the vHs points, while providing consistent explanations to many exotic behaviours previously observed in this material, suggests Cooper pairing induced by a strong coupling mechanism.
  • We present a study of the tetragonal to collapsed-tetragonal transition of CaFe2As2 using angle-resolved photoemission experiments and dynamical mean field theory-based electronic structure calculations. We observe that the collapsed-tetragonal phase exhibits reduced correlations and a higher coherence temperature due to the stronger Fe-As hybridization. Furthermore, a comparison of measured photoemission spectra and theoretical spectral functions shows that momentum-dependent corrections to the density functional band structure are essential for the description of low-energy quasiparticle dispersions. We introduce those using the recently proposed combined "Screened Exchange + Dynamical Mean Field Theory" scheme.
  • We present the G-virial method (available at http://gxli.github.io/G-virial/) which aims to quantify (1) the importance of gravity in molecular clouds in the position-position-velocity (PPV) space, and (2) properties of the gas condensations in molecular clouds. Different from previous approaches that calculate the virial parameter for different regions, our new method takes gravitational interactions between all the voxels in 3D PPV data cubes into account, and generates maps of the importance of gravity. This map can be combined with the original data cube to derive relations such as the mass-radius relation. Our method is important for several reasons. First, it offers the the ability to quantify the centrally condensed structures in the 3D PPV data cubes, and enables us to compare them in an uniform framework. Second, it allows us to understand the importance of gravity at different locations in the data cube, and provides a global picture of gravity in clouds. Third, it offers a robust approach to decomposing the data into different regions which are gravitationally coherent. To demonstrate the application of our method we identified regions from the Perseus and Ophiuchus molecular clouds, and analyzed their properties. We found an increase in the importance of gravity towards the centers of the individual molecular condensations. We also quantified the properties of the regions in terms of mass-radius and mass-velocity relations. Through evaluating the virial parameters based on the G-virial, we found that all our regions are almost gravitationally bound. Cluster-forming regions appear are more centrally condensed.
  • Turbulent gas motion inside galaxy clusters provides a non-negligible non-thermal pressure support to the intracluster gas. If not corrected, it leads to a systematic bias in the estimation of cluster masses from X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) observations assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, and affects interpretation of measurements of the SZ power spectrum and observations of cluster outskirts from ongoing and upcoming large cluster surveys. Recently, Shi & Komatsu developed an analytical model for predicting the radius, mass, and redshift dependence of the non-thermal pressure contributed by the kinetic random motions of intracluster gas sourced by the cluster mass growth. In this paper, we compare the predictions of this analytical model to a state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamics simulation. As different mass growth histories result in different non-thermal pressure, we perform the comparison on 65 simulated galaxy clusters on a cluster-by-cluster basis. We find an excellent agreement between the modelled and simulated non-thermal pressure profiles. Our results open up the possibility of using the analytical model to correct the systematic bias in the mass estimation of galaxy clusters. We also discuss tests of the physical picture underlying the evolution of intracluster non-thermal gas motions, as well as a way to further improve the analytical modeling, which may help achieve a unified understanding of non-thermal phenomena in galaxy clusters.
  • Non-thermal pressure in the intracluster gas has been found ubiquitously in numerical simulations, and observed indirectly. In this paper we develop an analytical model for intracluster non-thermal pressure in the virial region of relaxed clusters. We write down and solve a first-order differential equation describing the evolution of non-thermal velocity dispersion. This equation is based on insights gained from observations, numerical simulations, and theory of turbulence. The non-thermal energy is sourced, in a self-similar fashion, by the mass growth of clusters via mergers and accretion, and dissipates with a time-scale determined by the turnover time of the largest turbulence eddies. Our model predicts a radial profile of non-thermal pressure for relaxed clusters. The non-thermal fraction increases with radius, redshift, and cluster mass, in agreement with numerical simulations. The radial dependence is due to a rapid increase of the dissipation time-scale with radii, and the mass and redshift dependence comes from the mass growth history. Combing our model for the non-thermal fraction with the Komatsu-Seljak model for the total pressure, we obtain thermal pressure profiles, and compute the hydrostatic mass bias. We find typically 10% bias for the hydrostatic mass enclosed within $r_{500}$.
  • With 3rd-order statistics of gravitational shear it will be possible to extract valuable cosmological information from ongoing and future weak lensing surveys which is not contained in standard 2nd-order statistics, due to the non-Gaussianity of the shear field. Aperture mass statistics are an appropriate choice for 3rd-order statistics due to their simple form and their ability to separate E- and B-modes of the shear. However, it has been demonstrated that 2nd-order aperture mass statistics suffer from E-/B-mode mixing because it is impossible to reliably estimate the shapes of close pairs of galaxies. This finding has triggered developments of several new 2nd-order statistical measures for cosmic shear. Whether the same developments are needed for 3rd-order shear statistics is largely determined by how severe this E-/B-mixing is for 3rd-order statistics. We test 3rd-order aperture mass statistics against E-/B-mode mixing, and find that the level of contamination is well-described by a function of $\theta/\theta_{\rm min}$, with $\theta_{\rm min}$ being the cut-off scale. At angular scales of $\theta > 10 \;\theta_{\rm min}$, the decrease in the E-mode signal due to E-/B-mode mixing is smaller than 1 percent, and the leakage into B-modes is even less. For typical small-scale cut-offs this E-/B-mixing is negligible on scales larger than a few arcminutes. Therefore, 3rd-order aperture mass statistics can safely be used to separate E- and B-modes and infer cosmological information, for ground-based surveys as well as forthcoming space-based surveys such as Euclid.
  • We studied nanoprecipitates and defects in p-type filled skutterudite CeFe4Sb12 prepared by non-equilibrium melt-spinning plus spark plasma sintering method using transmission electron microscopy. Nanoprecipitates with mostly spherical shapes and different sizes (from several nm to several tens of nm) have been observed. The most typically observed nanoprecipitates are shown to be Sb-rich. Superlattices with a periodicity of about 3.576 nm were induced by the ordering of excessive Sb atoms along the c direction. These nanoprecipitates usually share coherent interfaces with the surrounding matrix and induce anisotropic and strong strain fields in the surrounding matrix. Nanoprecipitates with compositions close to CeSb2 are much larger in size (~ 30 nm) and have orthorhombic structures. Various defects were typically observed on the interfaces between these nanoprecipitates and the matrix. The strain fields induced by these nanoprecipitates are less distinct, possibly because part of the strains has been released by the formation of defects.
  • p-type Ce1.05Fe4Sb12.04 filled skutterudites with much improved thermoelectric properties have been synthesized by rapidly converting nearly amorphous ribbons into crystalline pellets under pressure. It is found that this process greatly suppresses grain growth and second phase formation/segregation, and hence results in the samples consisting of nano-sized grains with strongly-coupled grain boundaries, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. The room temperature carrier mobility in these samples is significantly higher (nearly double) than those in the samples of the same starting composition made by the conventional solid-state reaction. Nanostructure reduces the lattice thermal conductivity, while cleaner grain boundaries permit higher electron conduction.