• Quantum-dot (QD) nanolasers integrated on a silicon photonic circuit are demonstrated for the first time. QD nanolasers based on one-dimensional photonic crystal nanocavities containing InAs/GaAs QDs are integrated on CMOS-processed silicon waveguides cladded by silicon dioxide. We employed transfer-printing, whereby the three-dimensional stack of photonic nanostructures is assembled in a simple pick-and-place manner. Lasing operation and waveguide-coupling of an assembled single nanolaser are confirmed through micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy. Furthermore, by repetitive transfer-printing, two QD nanolasers integrated onto a single silicon waveguide are demonstrated, opening a path to develop compact light sources potentially applicable for wavelength division multiplexing.
  • We report time-domain observation of vacuum Rabi oscillations in a single quantum dot strongly coupled to a nanocavity under incoherent optical carrier injection. We realize a photonic crystal nanocavity with a very high quality factor of >80,000 and employ it to clearly resolve the ultrafast vacuum Rabi oscillations by simple photoluminescence-based experiments. We found that the time-domain vacuum Rabi oscillations were largely modified when changing the pump wavelength and intensity, even when marginal changes were detected in the corresponding photoluminescence spectra. We analyze the measured time-domain oscillations by fitting to simulation curves obtained with a cavity quantum electrodynamics model. The observed modifications of the oscillation curves were mainly induced by the change in the carrier capture and dephasing dynamics in the quantum dot, as well as the change in bare-cavity emission. This result suggests that vacuum Rabi oscillations can be utilized as a highly sensitive probe for the quantum dot dynamics. Our work points out a powerful alternative to conventional spectral-domain measurements for a deeper understanding of the vacuum Rabi dynamics in quantum dot-based cavity quantum electrodynamics systems.
  • The quantum nature of light-matter interactions in a circularly polarized vacuum field was probed by spontaneous emission from quantum dots in three-dimensional chiral photonic crystals. Due to the circularly polarized eigenmodes along the helical axis in the GaAs-based mirror-asymmetric structures we studied, we observed highly circularly polarized emission from the quantum dots. Both spectroscopic and time-resolved measurements confirmed that the obtained circularly polarized light was influenced by a large difference in the photonic density of states between the orthogonal components of the circular polarization in the vacuum field.
  • A pencil-like morphology of homoepitaxially grown GaN nanowires is exploited for the fabrication of thin conformal intrawire InGaN nanoshells which host quantum dots in nonpolar, semipolar and polar crystal regions. All three quantum dot types exhibit single photon emission with narrow emission line widths and high degrees of linear optical polarization. The host crystal region strongly affects both single photon wavelength and emission lifetime, reaching subnanosecond time scales for the non- and semipolar quantum dots. Localization sites in the InGaN potential landscape, most likely induced by indium fluctuations across the InGaN nanoshell, are identified as the driving mechanism for the single photon emission. The hereby reported pencil-like InGaN nanoshell is the first single nanostructure able to host all three types of single photon sources and is, thus, a promising building block for tunable quantum light devices integrated into future photonic circuits.
  • Repeated injection of spin polarized carriers in a quantum dot leads to the polarization of nuclear spins, a process known as dynamic nuclear spin polarization (DNP). Here, we report the first observation of p-shell carrier assisted DNP in single QDs at zero external magnetic field. The nuclear field - measured by using the Overhauser shift of the singly charged exciton state of the QDs - continues to increase, even after the carrier population in the s-shell saturates. This is also accompanied by an abrupt increase in nuclear spin buildup time as p-shell emission overtakes that of the s-shell. We attribute the observation to p-shell electrons strongly altering the nuclear spin dynamics in the QD, supported by numerical simulation results based on a rate equation model of coupling between electron and nuclear spin system. DNP with p-shell carriers could open up avenues for further control to increase the degree of nuclear spin polarization in QDs.
  • We investigate the use of guided modes bound to defects in photonic crystals for achieving double resonances. Photoluminescence enhancement by more than three orders of magnitude has been observed when the excitation and emission wavelengths are simultaneously in resonance with the localized guided mode and cavity mode, respectively. We find that the localized guided modes are relatively insensitive to the size of the defect for one of the polarizations, allowing for flexible control over the wavelength combinations. This double resonance technique is expected to enable enhancement of photoluminescence and nonlinear wavelength conversion efficiencies in a wide variety of systems.
  • Circular dichroism covering the telecommunication band is experimentally demonstrated in a semiconductor-based three-dimensional chiral photonic crystal (PhC). We design a rotationally-stacked woodpile PhC structure where neighboring layers are rotated by 60 degrees and three layers construct a single helical unit. The mirror-asymmetric PhC made from GaAs with sub-micron periodicity is fabricated by a micro-manipulation technique. Due to the large contrast of refractive indices between GaAs and air, the experimentally obtained circular dichroism extends over a wide wavelength range, with the transmittance of right-handed circularly polarized incident light being 85% and that of left-handed light being 15% at a wavelength of 1300 nm. The obtained results show good agreement with numerical simulations.
  • We report on high efficency coupling of individual air-suspended carbon nanotubes to silicon photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. Photoluminescence images of dielectric- and air-mode cavities reflect their distinctly different mode profiles and show that fields in the air are important for coupling. We find that the air-mode cavities couple more efficiently, and estimated spontaneous emission coupling factors reach a value as high as 0.85. Our results demonstrate advantages of ultralow mode-volumes in air-mode cavities for coupling to low-dimensional nanoscale emitters.
  • Optical rotation is experimentally demonstrated in a semiconductor-based three-dimensional chiral photonic crystal (PhC) at a telecommunication wavelength. We design a rotationally-stacked woodpile PhC structure, where neighboring layers are rotated by 45 degrees and four layers construct a single helical unit. The mirror-asymmetric PhC made from GaAs with sub-micron periodicity is fabricated by a micro-manipulation technique. The linearly polarized light incident on the structure undergoes optical rotation during transmission. The obtained results show good agreement with numerical simulations. The measurement demonstrates the largest optical rotation angle as large as 23 degrees at 1300 nm wavelength for a single helical unit.
  • Photonic crystal nanocavities are used to enhance photoluminescence from single-walled carbon nanotubes. Micelle-encapsulated nanotubes are deposited on nanocavities within Si photonic crystal slabs and confocal microscopy is used to characterize the devices. Photoluminescence spectra and images reveal nanotube emission coupled to nanocavity modes. The cavity modes can be tuned throughout the emission wavelengths of carbon nanotubes, demonstrating the ability to enhance photoluminescence from a variety of chiralities.
  • Spontaneous two photon emission from a solid-state single quantum emitter is observed. We investigated photoluminescence from the neutral biexciton in a single semiconductor quantum dot coupled with a high Q photonic crystal nanocavity. When the cavity is resonant to the half energy of the biexciton, the strong vacuum field in the cavity inspires the biexciton to simultaneously emit two photons into the mode, resulting in clear emission enhancement of the mode. Meanwhile, suppression was observed of other single photon emission from the biexciton, as the two photon emission process becomes faster than the others at the resonance.
  • We present a comparative micro-photoluminescence study of the emission intensity of self-assembled germanium islands coupled to the resonator mode of two-dimensional silicon photonic crystal defect nanocavities. The emission intensity is investigated for cavity modes of L3 and Hexapole cavities with different cavity quality factors. For each of these cavities many nominally identical samples are probed to obtain reliable statistics. As the quality factor increases we observe a clear decrease in the average mode emission intensity recorded under comparable optical pumping conditions. This clear experimentally observed trend is compared with simulations based on a dissipative master equation approach that describes a cavity weakly coupled to an ensemble of emitters. We obtain evidence that reabsorption of photons emitted into the cavity mode is responsible for the observed trend. In combination with the observation of cavity linewidth broadening in power dependent measurements, we conclude that free carrier absorption is the limiting effect for the cavity mediated light enhancement under conditions of strong pumping.
  • We present a temperature dependent photoluminescence study of silicon optical nanocavities formed by introducing point defects into two-dimensional photonic crystals. In addition to the prominent TO phonon assisted transition from crystalline silicon at ~1.10 eV we observe a broad defect band luminescence from ~1.05-1.09 eV. Spatially resolved spectroscopy demonstrates that this defect band is present only in the region where air-holes have been etched during the fabrication process. Detectable emission from the cavity mode persists up to room-temperature, in strong contrast the background emission vanishes for T > 150 K. An Ahrrenius type analysis of the temperature dependence of the luminescence signal recorded either in-resonance with the cavity mode, or weakly detuned, suggests that the higher temperature stability may arise from an enhanced internal quantum efficiency due to the Purcell-effect.
  • Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in photonic nanocavities provide monolithic, robust platforms for both quantum information processing and cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). An inherent feature of such solid-state cavity QED systems is the presence of electron-phonon interactions, which distinguishes these systems from conventional atomic cavity QED. Understanding the effects of electron-phonon interactions on these systems is indispensable for controlling and exploiting the rich physics that they exhibit. Here we investigate the effects of electron-phonon interactions on a QD-based cavity QED system. When the QD and the cavity are off-resonance, we observe phonon-assisted cavity mode emission that strongly depends on the temperature and cavity-detuning. When they are on-resonance, we observe an asymmetric vacuum Rabi doublet, the splitting of which narrows with increasing temperature. These experimental observations can be well reproduced using a cavity QED model that includes electron-acoustic-phonon interactions. Our work provides significant insight into the important but hitherto poorly understood mechanism of non-resonant QD-cavity coupling and into the physics of various cavity QED systems utilizing emitters coupled to phonons, such as nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond and colloidal nanocrystals.
  • Strong coupling of photons and materials in semiconductor nanocavity systems has been investigated because of its potentials in quantum information processing and related applications, and has been testbeds for cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). Interesting phenomena such as coherent exchange of a single quantum between a single quantum dot and an optical cavity, called vacuum Rabi oscillation, and highly efficient cavity QED lasers have been reported thus far. The coexistence of vacuum Rabi oscillation and laser oscillation appears to be contradictory in nature, because the fragile reversible process may not survive in laser oscillation. However, recently, it has been theoretically predicted that the strong-coupling effect could be sustained in laser oscillation in properly designed semiconductor systems. Nevertheless, the experimental realization of this phenomenon has remained difficult since the first demonstration of the strong-coupling, because an extremely high cavity quality factor and strong light-matter coupling are both required for this purpose. Here, we demonstrate the onset of laser oscillation in the strong-coupling regime in a single quantum dot (SQD)-cavity system. A high-quality semiconductor optical nanocavity and strong SQD-field coupling enabled to the onset of lasing while maintaining the fragile coherent exchange of quanta between the SQD and the cavity. In addition to the interesting physical features, this device is seen as a prototype of an ultimate solid state light source with an SQD gain, which operates at ultra-low power, with expected applications in future nanophotonic integrated systems and monolithic quantum information devices.
  • We experimentally study the transport features of electrons in a spin-diode structure consisting of a single semiconductor quantum dot (QD) weakly coupled to one nonmagnetic (NM) and one ferromagnetic (FM) lead, in which the QD has an artificial atomic nature. A Coulomb stability diamond shows asymmetric features with respect to the polarity of the bias voltage. For the regime of two-electron tunneling, we find anomalous suppression of the current for both forward and reverse bias. We discuss possible mechanisms of the anomalous current suppression in terms of spin blockade via the QD/FM interface at the ground state of a two-electron QD.
  • We experimentally study the transport properties of silicon quantum dots (QDs) fabricated from a highly doped n-type silicon-on-insulator wafer. Low noise electrical measurements using a low temperature complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (LTCMOS) amplifier are performed at 4.2 K in liquid helium. Two series of Coulomb peaks are observed: long-period oscillations and fine structures, and both of them show clear source drain voltage dependence. We also observe two series of Coulomb diamonds having different periodicity. The obtained experimental results are well reproduced by a master equation analysis using a model of double QDs coupled in parallel.
  • Using a laterally-fabricated quantum-dot (QD) spin-valve device, we experimentally study the Kondo effect in the electron transport through a semiconductor QD with an odd number of electrons (N). In a parallel magnetic configuration of the ferromagnetic electrodes, the Kondo resonance at N = 3 splits clearly without external magnetic fields. With applying magnetic fields (B), the splitting is gradually reduced, and then the Kondo effect is almost restored at B = 1.2 T. This means that, in the Kondo regime, an inverse effective magnetic field of B ~ 1.2 T can be applied to the QD in the parallel magnetic configuration of the ferromagnetic electrodes.
  • We demonstrate an electric-field control of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) effect in a semiconductor quantum-dot (QD) spin-valve device. By using ferromagnetic Ni nano-gap electrodes, we observe the Coulomb blockade oscillations at a small bias voltage. In the vicinity of the Coulomb blockade peak, the TMR effect is significantly modulated and even its sign is switched by changing the gate voltage, where the sign of the TMR value changes at the resonant condition.
  • We have fabricated a lateral double barrier magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) which consists of a single self-assembled InAs quantum dot (QD) with ferromagnetic Co leads. The MTJ shows clear hysteretic tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect, which is evidence for spin transport through a single semiconductor QD. The TMR ratio and the curve shapes are varied by changing the gate voltage.
  • We study the edge-channel transport of electrons in a high-mobility Si/SiGe two-dimensional electron system in the quantum Hall regime. By selectively populating the spin-resolved edge channels, we observe suppression of the scattering between two edge channels with spin-up and spin-down. In contrast, when the Zeeman splitting of the spin-resolved levels is enlarged with tilting magnetic field direction, the spin orientations of both the relevant edge channels are switched to spin-down, and the inter-edge-channel scattering is strongly promoted. The evident spin dependence of the adiabatic edge-channel transport is an individual feature in silicon-based two-dimensional electron systems, originating from a weak spin-orbit interaction.
  • The degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy of uniaxially strained GaN layers is demonstrated using colinearly polarized laser pulses. The nonlinear response of FWM signal on exciton oscillator strength enhances the sensitivity for polarized exciton, allowing for mapping out the in-plane anisotropy of the strain field. The observed high-contrast spectral polarization clearly shows fine structure splittings of excitons, which are also confirmed in the change of quantum beating periods of time.