• The variation in the radiative output of the Sun, described in terms of solar irradiance, is important to climatology. A common assumption is that solar irradiance variability is driven by its surface magnetism. Verifying this assumption has, however, been hampered by the fact that models of solar irradiance variability based on solar surface magnetism have to be calibrated to observed variability. Making use of realistic three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar atmosphere and state-of-the-art solar magnetograms from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present a model of total solar irradiance (TSI) that does not require any such calibration. In doing so, the modeled irradiance variability is entirely independent of the observational record. (The absolute level is calibrated to the TSI record from the Total Irradiance Monitor.) The model replicates 95% of the observed variability between April 2010 and July 2016, leaving little scope for alternative drivers of solar irradiance variability at least over the time scales examined (days to years).
  • We present a reconstruction of the spectral solar irradiance since 1700 using the SATIRE-T2 (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstructions for the Telescope era version 2) model. This model uses as input magnetograms simulated with a surface flux transport model fed with semi-synthetic records of emerging sunspot groups. We used statistical relationships between the properties of sunspot group emergence, such as the latitude, area, and tilt angle, and the sunspot cycle strength and phase to produce semi-synthetic sunspot group records starting in the year 1700. The semisynthetic records are fed into a surface flux transport model to obtain daily simulated magnetograms that map the distribution of the magnetic flux in active regions (sunspots and faculae) and their decay products on the solar surface. The magnetic flux emerging in ephemeral regions is accounted for separately based on the concept of extended cycles whose length and amplitude are linked to those of the sunspot cycles through the sunspot number. The magnetic flux in each surface component (sunspots, faculae and network, and ephemeral regions) was used to compute the spectral and total solar irradiance between the years 1700 and 2009. This reconstruction is aimed at timescales of months or longer although the model returns daily values. We found that SATIRE-T2, besides reproducing other relevant observations such as the total magnetic flux, reconstructs the total solar irradiance (TSI) on timescales of months or longer in good agreement with the PMOD composite of observations, as well as with the reconstruction starting in 1878 based on the RGO-SOON data. The model predicts an increase in the TSI of 1.2[+0.2, -0.3] Wm-2 between 1700 and the present. The spectral irradiance reconstruction is in good agreement with the UARS/SUSIM measurements as well as the Lyman-alpha composite.
  • The Sun is the only star whose surface can be directly resolved at high resolution, and therefore constitutes an excellent test case to explore the physical origin of stellar radial-velocity (RV) variability. We present HARPS observations of sunlight scattered off the bright asteroid 4/Vesta, from which we deduced the Sun's activity-driven RV variations. In parallel, the HMI instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory provided us with simultaneous high spatial resolution magnetograms, Dopplergrams, and continuum images of the Sun in the Fe I 6173A line. We determine the RV modulation arising from the suppression of granular blueshift in magnetised regions and the flux imbalance induced by dark spots and bright faculae. The rms velocity amplitudes of these contributions are 2.40 m/s and 0.41 m/s, respectively, which confirms that the inhibition of convection is the dominant source of activity-induced RV variations at play, in accordance with previous studies. We find the Doppler imbalances of spot and plage regions to be only weakly anticorrelated. Lightcurves can thus only give incomplete predictions of convective blueshift suppression. We must instead seek proxies that track the plage coverage on the visible stellar hemisphere directly. The chromospheric flux index R'_HK derived from the HARPS spectra performs poorly in this respect, possibly because of the differences in limb brightening/darkening in the chromosphere and photosphere. We also find that the activity-driven RV variations of the Sun are strongly correlated with its full-disc magnetic flux density, which may become a useful proxy for activity-related RV noise.
  • The composition and structure of the upper atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets (EGPs) are affected by the high-energy spectrum of their host stars from soft X-rays to EUV. This emission depends on the activity level of the star, which is primarily determined by its age. We focus upon EGPs orbiting K- and M-dwarf stars of different ages. XUV spectra for these stars are constructed using a coronal model. These spectra are used to drive both a thermospheric model and an ionospheric model, providing densities of neutral and ion species. Ionisation is included through photo-ionisation and electron-impact processes. We find that EGP ionospheres at all orbital distances considered and around all stars selected are dominated by the long-lived H$^+$ ion. In addition, planets with upper atmospheres where H$_2$ is not substantially dissociated have a layer in which H$_3^+$ is the major ion at the base of the ionosphere. For fast-rotating planets, densities of short-lived H$_3^+$ undergo significant diurnal variations, with the maximum value being driven by the stellar X-ray flux. In contrast, densities of longer-lived H$^+$ show very little day/night variability and the magnitude is driven by the level of stellar EUV flux. The H$_3^+$ peak in EGPs with upper atmospheres where H$_2$ is dissociated under strong stellar illumination is pushed to altitudes below the homopause, where this ion is likely to be destroyed through reactions with heavy species. The inclusion of secondary ionisation processes produces significantly enhanced ion and electron densities at altitudes below the main EUV ionisation peak, as compared to models that do not include electron-impact ionisation. We estimate infrared emissions from H$_3^+$, and while, in an H/H$_2$/He atmosphere, these are larger from planets orbiting close to more active stars, they still appear too low to be detected with current observatories.
  • We estimate the accretion rates of 235 Classical T Tauri star (CTTS) candidates in the Lagoon Nebula using $ugri$H$\alpha$ photometry from the VPHAS+ survey. Our sample consists of stars displaying H$\alpha$-excess, the intensity of which is used to derive accretion rates. For a subset of 87 stars, the intensity of the $u$-band excess is also used to estimate accretion rates. We find the mean variation in accretion rates measured using H$\alpha$ and $u$-band intensities to be $\sim$ 0.17 dex, agreeing with previous estimates (0.04-0.4 dex) but for a much larger sample. The spatial distribution of CTTS align with the location of protostars and molecular gas suggesting that they retain an imprint of the natal gas fragmentation process. Strong accretors are concentrated spatially, while weak accretors are more distributed. Our results do not support the sequential star forming processes suggested in the literature.
  • Total solar irradiance and UV spectral solar irradiance have been monitored since 1978 through a succession of space missions. This is accompanied by the development of models aimed at replicating solar irradiance by relating the variability to solar magnetic activity. The NRLSSI and SATIRE-S models provide the most comprehensive reconstructions of total and spectral solar irradiance over the period of satellite observation currently available. There is persistent controversy between the various measurements and models in terms of the wavelength dependence of the variation over the solar cycle, with repercussions on our understanding of the influence of UV solar irradiance variability on the stratosphere. We review the measurement and modelling of UV solar irradiance variability over the period of satellite observation. The SATIRE-S reconstruction is consistent with spectral solar irradiance observations where they are reliable. It is also supported by an independent, empirical reconstruction of UV spectral solar irradiance based on UARS/SUSIM measurements from an earlier study. The weaker solar cycle variability produced by NRLSSI between 300 and 400 nm is not evident in any available record. We show that although the method employed to construct NRLSSI is principally sound, reconstructed solar cycle variability is detrimentally affected by the uncertainty in the SSI observations it draws upon in the derivation. Based on our findings, we recommend, when choosing between the two models, the use of SATIRE-S for climate studies.
  • O and early B stars are at the apex of galactic ecology, but in the Milky Way, only a minority of them may yet have been identified. We present the results of a pilot study to select and parametrise OB star candidates in the Southern Galactic plane, down to a limiting magnitude of $g=20$. A 2 square-degree field capturing the Carina Arm around the young massive star cluster, Westerlund 2, is examined. The confirmed OB stars in this cluster are used to validate our identification method, based on selection from the $(u-g, g-r)$ diagram for the region. Our Markov Chain Monte Carlo fitting method combines VPHAS+ $u, g, r, i$ with published $J, H, K$ photometry in order to derive posterior probability distributions of the stellar parameters $\log(\rm T_{\rm eff})$ and distance modulus, together with the reddening parameters $A_0$ and $R_V$. The stellar parameters are sufficient to confirm OB status while the reddening parameters are determined to a precision of $\sigma(A_0)\sim0.09$ and $\sigma(R_V)\sim0.08$. There are 489 objects that fit well as new OB candidates, earlier than $\sim$B2. This total includes 74 probable massive O stars, 5 likely blue supergiants and 32 reddened subdwarfs. This increases the number of previously known and candidate OB stars in the region by nearly a factor of 10. Most of the new objects are likely to be at distances between 3 and 6 kpc. We have confirmed the results of previous studies that, at these longer distances, these sight lines require non-standard reddening laws with $3.5<R_V<4$.
  • Upper atmospheres of Hot Jupiters are subject to extreme radiation conditions that can result in rapid atmospheric escape. The composition and structure of the upper atmospheres of these planets are affected by the high-energy spectrum of the host star. This emission depends on stellar type and age, which are thus important factors in understanding the behaviour of exoplanetary atmospheres. In this study, we focus on Extrasolar Giant Planets (EPGs) orbiting K and M dwarf stars. XUV spectra for three different stars - epsilon Eridani, AD Leonis and AU Microscopii - are constructed using a coronal model. Neutral density and temperature profiles in the upper atmosphere of hypothetical EGPs orbiting these stars are then obtained from a fluid model, incorporating atmospheric chemistry and taking atmospheric escape into account. We find that a simple scaling based solely on the host star's X-ray emission gives large errors in mass loss rates from planetary atmospheres and so we have derived a new method to scale the EUV regions of the solar spectrum based upon stellar X-ray emission. This new method produces an outcome in terms of the planet's neutral upper atmosphere very similar to that obtained using a detailed coronal model of the host star. Our results indicate that in planets subjected to radiation from active stars, the transition from Jeans escape to a regime of hydrodynamic escape at the top of the atmosphere occurs at larger orbital distances than for planets around low activity stars (such as the Sun).
  • The INT/WFC Photometric H-Alpha Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane (IPHAS) is a 1800 square degrees imaging survey covering Galactic latitudes |b| < 5 deg and longitudes l = 30 to 215 deg in the r, i and H-alpha filters using the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on the 2.5-metre Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) in La Palma. We present the first quality-controlled and globally-calibrated source catalogue derived from the survey, providing single-epoch photometry for 219 million unique sources across 92% of the footprint. The observations were carried out between 2003 and 2012 at a median seeing of 1.1 arcsec (sampled at 0.33 arcsec/pixel) and to a mean 5\sigma-depth of 21.2 (r), 20.0 (i) and 20.3 (H-alpha) in the Vega magnitude system. We explain the data reduction and quality control procedures, describe and test the global re-calibration, and detail the construction of the new catalogue. We show that the new calibration is accurate to 0.03 mag (rms) and recommend a series of quality criteria to select the most reliable data from the catalogue. Finally, we demonstrate the ability of the catalogue's unique (r-Halpha, r-i) diagram to (1) characterise stellar populations and extinction regimes towards different Galactic sightlines and (2) select H-alpha emission-line objects. IPHAS is the first survey to offer comprehensive CCD photometry of point sources across the Galactic Plane at visible wavelengths, providing the much-needed counterpart to recent infrared surveys.
  • Since the discovery of the transiting super-Earth CoRoT-7b, several investigations have yielded different results for the number and masses of planets present in the system, mainly owing to the star's high level of activity. We re-observed CoRoT-7 in January 2012 with both HARPS and CoRoT, so that we now have the benefit of simultaneous radial-velocity and photometric data. This allows us to use the off-transit variations in the star's light curve to estimate the radial-velocity variations induced by the suppression of convective blueshift and the flux blocked by starspots. To account for activity-related effects in the radial-velocities which do not have a photometric signature, we also include an additional activity term in the radial-velocity model, which we treat as a Gaussian process with the same covariance properties (and hence the same frequency structure) as the light curve. Our model was incorporated into a Monte Carlo Markov Chain in order to make a precise determination of the orbits of CoRoT-7b and CoRoT-7c. We measure the masses of planets b and c to be 4.73 +/- 0.95 Mearth and 13.56 +/- 1.08 Mearth, respectively. The density of CoRoT-7b is (6.61 +/- 1.72)(Rp/1.58 Rearth)^(-3) g.cm^(-3), which is compatible with a rocky composition. We search for evidence of an additional planet d, identified by previous authors with a period close to 9 days. We are not able to confirm the existence of a planet with this orbital period, which is close to the second harmonic of the stellar rotation at around 7.9 days. Using Bayesian model selection we find that a model with two planets plus activity-induced variations is most favoured.
  • The lack of long and reliable time series of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) measurements makes an accurate quantification of solar contributions to recent climate change difficult. Whereas earlier SSI observations and models provided a qualitatively consistent picture of the SSI variability, recent measurements by the SORCE satellite suggest a significantly stronger variability in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range and changes in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) bands in anti-phase with the solar cycle. A number of recent chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations have shown that this might have significant implications on the Earth's atmosphere. Motivated by these results, we summarize here our current knowledge of SSI variability and its impact on Earth's climate. We present a detailed overview of existing SSI measurements and provide thorough comparison of models available to date. SSI changes influence the Earth's atmosphere, both directly, through changes in shortwave (SW) heating and therefore, temperature and ozone distributions in the stratosphere, and indirectly, through dynamical feedbacks. We investigate these direct and indirect effects using several state-of-the art CCM simulations forced with measured and modeled SSI changes. A unique asset of this study is the use of a common comprehensive approach for an issue that is usually addressed separately by different communities. Omissis. Finally, we discuss the reliability of the available data and we propose additional coordinated work, first to build composite SSI datasets out of scattered observations and to refine current SSI models, and second, to run coordinated CCM experiments.
  • Context: The study of variations in total solar irradiance (TSI) is important for understanding how the Sun affects the Earth's climate. Aims: Full-disk continuum images and magnetograms are now available for three full solar cycles. We investigate how modelled TSI compares with direct observations by building a consistent modelled TSI dataset. The model, based only on changes in the photospheric magnetic flux can then be tested on rotational, cyclical and secular timescales. Methods: We use Kitt Peak and SoHO/MDI continuum images and magnetograms in the SATIRE-S model to reconstruct TSI over cycles 21-23. To maximise independence from TSI composites, SORCE/TIM TSI data are used to fix the one free parameter of the model. We compare and combine the separate data sources for the model to estimate an uncertainty on the reconstruction and prevent any additional free parameters entering the model. Results: The reconstruction supports the PMOD composite as being the best historical record of TSI observations, although on timescales of the solar rotation the IRMB composite provides somewhat better agreement. Further to this, the model is able to account for 92% of TSI variations from 1978 to 2009 in the PMOD composite and over 96% during cycle 23. The reconstruction also displays an inter-cycle, secular decline of 0.20 (+0.12 / -0.09) Wm-2 between cycle 23 minima, in agreement with the PMOD composite. Conclusions: SATIRE-S is able to recreate TSI observations on all timescales of a day and longer over 31 years from 1978. This is strong evidence that changes in photospheric magnetic flux alone are responsible for almost all solar irradiance variations over the last three solar cycles.
  • This study is an investigation of the stellar density profile of the Galactic disc in the Anticentre direction. We select over 40,000 early A stars from IPHAS photometry in the Galactic longitude range 160 < l < 200 close to the equatorial plane (-1 < b < +1). We then compare their observed reddening-corrected apparent magnitude distribution with simulated photometry obtained from parameterised models in order to set constraints on the Anticentre stellar density profile. By selecting A stars, we are appraising the properties of a population only ~100 Myrs old. We find the stellar density profile of young stars is well fit to an exponential with length scale of (3020 \pm 120_{statistical} \pm 180_{systematic}) pc, which is comparable to that obtained in earlier studies, out to a Galactocentric radius of R_T = (13.0 \pm 0.5_{statistical} \pm 0.6_{systematic}) kpc. At larger radii the rate of decline appears to increase with the scale length dropping to (1200 \pm 300_{statistical} \pm 70_{systematic}) pc. This result amounts to a refinement of the conclusions reached in previous studies that the stellar density profile is abruptly truncated. The IPHAS A star data are not compatible with models that propose a sudden change in metallicity at R_G = 10 kpc.
  • We present Doppler imaging and a Balmer line analysis of the weak-line T Tauri star TWA 17. Spectra were taken in 2006 with the UCL Echelle Spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. Using least-squares deconvolution to improve the effective signal-to-noise ratio we produced a Doppler map of the surface spot distribution. This shows similar features to maps of other rapidly rotating T Tauri stars, i.e. a polar spot with more spots extending out of it down to the equator. In addition to the photospheric variability, the chromospheric variability was studied using the Balmer emission. The mean H-alpha profile has a narrow component consistent with rotational broadening and a broad component extending out to +/-220 km/s. The variability in H-alpha suggests that the chromosphere has at least one slingshot prominence 3 stellar radii above the surface.
  • The main goal of this paper is to prove that accreting very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs can be identified in IPHAS, a Halpha emission survey of the northern Milky Way.Full exploitation of the IPHAS database and a future extension of it in the southern hemisphere will be useful to identify very low-mass accreting objects near and far well-known star forming regions. We have used Virtual Observatory tools to cross-match the IPHAS catalogue with the 2MASS catalogue. We defined photometric criteria to identify Halpha emission sources with near-infrared colours similar to known young very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. 4000 candidates were identified that met our criteria over an area of 1600 square degrees. We present low-resolution optical spectra of 113 candidates. Spectral types have been derived for the 33 candidates that have spectroscopically confirmed Halpha emission, negligible reddening and M spectral class. We have also measured Halpha emission and investigated the NaI doublet (818.3 nm, 819.5 nm) in these 33 objects. We confirm that 33 IPHAS candidates have strong Halpha indicative of disk accretion for their spectral type. 23 of them have spectral class M4 or later, of which 10 have classes in the range M5.5-M7.0 and thus could be very young brown dwarfs. Also many objects have weak NaI doublet, an indication of low surface gravity.We conclude that IPHAS provides a very valuable database to identify accreting very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs, and that Virtual Observatory tools provide an efficient method for identifying these objects over large areas of the sky. Based on our success rate of 23 Halpha emission objects with spectral type in the range M4-M7 out of 113 candidates with spectroscopic follow-up, we estimate that there could be hundreds of such objects in the full IPHAS survey.
  • We present an algorithm ({\scshape mead}, for `Mapping Extinction Against Distance') which will determine intrinsic ($r' - i'$) colour, extinction, and distance for early-A to K4 stars extracted from the IPHAS $r'/i'/\Halpha$ photometric database. These data can be binned up to map extinction in three dimensions across the northern Galactic Plane. The large size of the IPHAS database ($\sim 200$ million unique objects), the accuracy of the digital photometry it contains and its faint limiting magnitude ($r' \sim 20$) allow extinction to be mapped with fine angular ($ \sim 10 $ arcmin) and distance ($\sim 0.1$ ~kpc) resolution to distances of up to 10 kpc, outside the Solar Circle. High reddening within the Solar Circle on occasion brings this range down to $\sim 2$ kpc. The resolution achieved, both in angle and depth, greatly exceeds that of previous empirical 3D extinction maps, enabling the structure of the Galactic Plane to be studied in increased detail. {\scshape mead} accounts for the effect of the survey magnitude limits, photometric errors, unresolved ISM substructure, and binarity. The impact of metallicity variations, within the range typical of the Galactic disc is small. The accuracy and reliability of {\scshape mead} are tested through the use of simulated photometry created with Monte-Carlo sampling techniques. The success of this algorithm is demonstrated on a selection of fields and the results are compared to the literature.
  • The INT/WFC Photometric H-alpha Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane (IPHAS) is an imaging survey being carried out in H-alpha, r' and i' filters, with the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on the 2.5-metre Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) to a depth of r'=20 (10 sigma). The survey is aimed at revealing large scale structure in our local galaxy, and also the properties of key early and late populations making up the Milky Way. Mapping emission line objects enables a particular focus on objects in the young and old stages of stellar evolution ranging from early T-Tauri stars to late planetary nebulae. In this paper we present the IPHAS Initial Data Release, primarily a photometric catalogue of about 200 million unique objects, coupled with associated image data covering about 1600 square degrees in three passbands. We note how access to the primary data products has been implemented through use of standard virtual observatory publishing interfaces. Simple traditional web access is provided to the main IPHAS photometric catalogue, in addition to a number of common catalogues (such as 2MASS) which are of immediate relevance. Access through the AstroGrid VO Desktop opens up the full range of analysis options, and allows full integration with the wider range of data and services available through the Virtual Observatory. The IDR represents the largest dataset published primarily through VO interfaces to date, and so stands as an examplar of the future of survey data mining. Examples of data access are given, including a cross-matching of IPHAS photometry with sources in the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey that validates the existing calibration of the best data.
  • We present Doppler imaging and Balmer line analysis of the weak-line T Tauri star TWA 6. Using this data we have made one of the first attempts to measure differential rotation in a T Tauri star, and the first detection of a slingshot prominence in such a star. We also show the most direct evidence to date of the existence of solar-type plages in a star other than the Sun. Observations were made over six nights: 11-13th February 2006 and 18-20th February 2006, when spectra were taken with the UCL Echelle Spectrograph on the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope. Using least-squares deconvolution to improve the effective signal--to--noise ratio we produced two Doppler maps. These show similar features to maps of other rapidly rotating T Tauri stars, i.e. a polar spot with more spots extending out of it down to equator. Comparison of the two maps was carried out to measure the differential rotation. Cross-correlation and parameter fitting indicates that TWA 6 does not have detectable differential rotation. The Balmer emission of the star was studied. The mean H-alpha profile has a narrow component consistent with rotational broadening and a broad component extending out to 250km/s. The variability in H-alpha suggests that the chromosphere has active regions that are cospatial with the spots in the photosphere, similar to the 'plages' observed on the Sun. In addition the star has at least one slingshot prominence 3 stellar radii above the surface - the first such detection in a T Tauri star.
  • We report the discovery of 5 massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars resulting from a programme of follow-up spectroscopy of candidate emission line stars in the AAO/UKST Southern Galactic Plane H-alpha survey. The 6195-6775 angstrom spectra of the stars are presented and discussed. A WC9 class is assigned to all 5 stars through comparison of their spectra with those of known late-type WC stars, bringing the known total number of Galactic WC9 stars to 44. Whilst three of the five WC9 stars exhibit near infrared (NIR) excesses characteristic of hot dust emission -- as seen in the great majority of known WC9 stars -- we find that two of the stars show no discernible evidence of such excesses. This increases the number of known WC9 stars without NIR excesses to 7. Reddenings and distances for all 5 stars are estimated.
  • We report the discovery of only the fourth massive WO star to be found in the Milky Way, and only the seventh identified within the Local Group. This has resulted from the first observations made in a programme of follow-up spectroscopy of candidate emission line stars from the AAO/UK Schmidt Southern Galactic Plane H-alpha Survey. The optical spectrum of this star, to become WR 93b in the Catalogue of Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars, is presented and described. WR 93b is classified as WO3 and is shown to be highly reddened (E(B-V) = 2.1 pm 0.1). A recombination line analysis of the emission lines yields the abundance ratios C/He = 0.95 and O/He = 0.13 (by number). Comparisons at near infrared wavelengths of reddening corrected photometry between WR 93b and both of Sand 2 (WO3, D = 49 kpc) and Sand 5 (WO2, D = 1.75 kpc) yields a consistent distance to WR 93b of 3.4 kpc. Positioned at Galactic co-ordinates l = 353.27, b = -0.85, the star is most likely located in the Scutum-Crux Arm of the inner Milky Way. We note that none of the four Galactic WO stars lies significantly beyond the Solar Circle (with two well inside). Estimation of the wind terminal velocity in WR 93b at 5750 km/s makes this star the current wind speed record holder among all non-degenerate stars.
  • We present results from the 1996 MUSICOS (MUlti-SIte COntinuous Spectroscopy) campaign on the T Tauri star SU Aurigae. We find a 2.7-d periodicity in the He I (587.6 nm) line and somewhat longer, less well-pronounced periodicities in the Balmer lines and in Na D. Our observations support the suggestion that the wind and infall signatures are out of phase on SU Aur. We present Doppler images of SU Aur that have been obtained from least-squares deconvolved profiles. Images taken about one rotation apart show only limited overlap, in particular at low latitudes. This is in part due to limitations in signal-to-noise, and in part due to line profile deformations that arise from short-lived and/or non-surface features. The agreement at high latitudes is better and suggests that at least some longer-lived features are present. The analysis of Stokes V profiles yields a marginal magnetic field detection during one of the phases.
  • The total area coverage by starspots is of interest for a variety of reasons, but direct techniques only provide estimates of this important quantity. Sunspot areas exhibit a lognormal size distribution irrespective of the phase of the activity cycle, implying that most sunspots are small. Here we explore the consequences if starspot areas were similarly distributed. The solar data allow for an increase in the fraction of larger sunspots with increasing activity. Taking this difference between the size distribution at sunspot maximum and minimum, we extrapolate to higher activity levels, assuming different dependencies of the parameters of the lognormal distribution on total spot coverage. We find that even for very heavily spotted (hypothetical) stars a large fraction of the spots are smaller than the current resolution limit of Doppler images and might hence be missed on traditional Doppler maps.