• We present a catalog of 10718 objects in the COSMOS field observed through multi-slit spectroscopy with the Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (DEIMOS) on the Keck II telescope in the wavelength range ~5500-9800A. The catalog contains 6617 objects with high-quality spectra (two or more spectral features), and 1798 objects with a single spectroscopic feature confirmed by the photometric redshift. For 2024 typically faint objects we could not obtain reliable redshifts. The objects have been selected from a variety of input catalogs based on multi-wavelength observations in the field, and thus have a diverse selection function, which enables the study of the diversity in the galaxy population. The magnitude distribution of our objects is peaked at I_AB~23 and K_AB~21, with a secondary peak at K_AB~24. We sample a broad redshift distribution in the range 0<z<6, with one peak at z~1, and another one around z~4. We have identified 13 redshift spikes at z>0.65 with chance probabilities <4xE-4$, some of which are clearly related to protocluster structures of sizes >10 Mpc. An object-to-object comparison with a multitude of other spectroscopic samples in the same field shows that our DEIMOS sample is among the best in terms of fraction of spectroscopic failures and relative redshift accuracy. We have determined the fraction of spectroscopic blends to about 0.8% in our sample. This is likely a lower limit and at any rate well below the most pessimistic expectations. Interestingly, we find evidence for strong lensing of Ly-alpha background emitters within the slits of 12 of our target galaxies, increasing their apparent density by about a factor of 4.
  • We measure a relation between the depth of four prominent rest-UV absorption complexes and metallicity for local galaxies and verify it up to z~3. We then apply this relation to a sample of 224 galaxies at 3.5 < z < 6.0 (<z> = 4.8) in COSMOS, for which unique UV spectra from DEIMOS and accurate stellar masses from SPLASH are available. The average galaxy population at z~5 and log(M/Msun) > 9 is characterized by 0.3-0.4 dex (in units of 12+log(O/H)) lower metallicities than at z~2, but comparable to z~3.5. We find galaxies with weak/no Ly-alpha emission to have metallicities comparable to z~2 galaxies and therefore may represent an evolved sub-population of z~5 galaxies. We find a correlation between metallicity and dust in good agreement with local galaxies and an inverse trend between metallicity and star-formation rate (SFR) consistent with observations at z~2. The relation between stellar mass and metallicity (MZ relation) is similar to z~3.5, however, there are indications of it being slightly shallower, in particular for the young, Ly-alpha emitting galaxies. We show that, within a "bathtub" approach, a shallower MZ relation is expected in the case of a fast (exponential) build-up of stellar mass with an e-folding time of 100-200 Myr. Due to this fast evolution, the process of dust production and metal enrichment as a function of mass could be more stochastic in the first billion years of galaxy formation compared to later times.
  • We report the discovery of three low-mass black hole candidates residing in the centers of low-mass galaxies at z<0.3 in the Chandra Deep Field - South Survey. These black holes are initially identified as candidate active galactic nuclei based on their X-ray emission in deep Chandra observations. Multi-wavelength observations are used to strengthen our claim that such emission is powered by an accreting supermassive black hole. While the X-ray luminosities are low at L_X ~ 10^40 erg s^-1 (and variable in one case), we argue that they are unlikely to be attributed to star formation based on H\alpha or UV-fluxes. Optical spectroscopy with Keck/DEIMOS and VLT/FORS allows us to (1) measure accurate redshifts, (2) confirm their low stellar host mass, (3) investigate the source(s) of photo-ionization, and (4) estimate extinction. With stellar masses of M* < 3*10^9 M_\sun determined from HST/ACS imaging, the host galaxies are among the lowest mass systems known to host actively accreting black holes. We estimate BH masses M_BH ~ 2*10^5 M_\sun based on scaling relations between BH mass and host properties for more luminous systems. In one case, a broad component of the H\alpha emission-line profile is detected thus providing a virial mass estimate. Black holes in such low-mass galaxies are of considerable interest as the low-redshift analogs to the seeds of the most massive BHs at high redshift which have remained largely elusive to date. Our study highlights the power of deep X-ray surveys to uncover such low-mass systems.
  • With this paper, we release accurate photometric redshifts for 1692 counterparts to Chandra sources in the central square degree of the COSMOS field. The availability of a large training set of spectroscopic redshifts that extends to faint magnitudes enabled photometric redshifts comparable to the highest quality results presently available for normal galaxies. We demonstrate that morphologically extended, faint X-ray sources without optical variability are more accurately described by a library of normal galaxies (corrected for emission lines) than by AGN-dominated templates, even if these sources have AGN-like X-ray luminosities. Preselecting the library on the bases of the source properties allowed us to reach an accuracy sigma_(Delta z/(1+z_spec)) \sim0.015 with a fraction of outliers of 5.8% for the entire Chandra-COSMOS sample. In addition, we release revised photometric redshifts for the 1735 optical counterparts of the XMM-detected sources over the entire 2 sq. deg.of COSMOS. For 248 sources, our updated photometric redshift differs from the previous release by Delta z>0.2. These changes are predominantly due to the inclusion of newly available deep H-band photometry H_AB=24 mag. We illustrate once again the importance of a spectroscopic training sample and how an assumption about the nature of a source together with the number and the depth of the available bands influence the accuracy of the photometric redshifts determined for AGN. These considerations should be kept in mind when defining the observational strategies of upcoming large surveys targeting AGN, such as eROSITA at X-ray energies and ASKAP/EMU in the radio band.
  • We searched for quasars that are ~ 3 mag fainter than the SDSS quasars in the redshift range 3.7 < z < 4.7 in the COSMOS field to constrain the faint end of the quasar luminosity function. Using optical photometric data, we selected 31 quasar candidates with 22 < i' < 24 at z ~ 4. We obtained optical spectra for most of these candidates using FOCAS on the Subaru telescope, and identified 8 low-luminosity quasars at z ~ 4. In order to derive the quasar luminosity function (QLF) based on our spectroscopic follow-up campaign, we estimated the photometric completeness of our quasar survey through detailed Monte Carlo simulations. Our QLF at z ~ 4 has a much shallower faint-end slope beta = -1.67^{+0.11}_{-0.17} than that obtained by other recent surveys in the same redshift. Our result is consistent with the scenario of downsizing evolution of active galactic nuclei inferred by recent optical and X-ray quasar surveys at lower redshifts.
  • We present an atlas of 88 z~5.7 and 30 z~6.5 Ly alpha emitters obtained from a wide-field narrowband survey. We combined deep narrowband imaging in 120A bandpass filters centered at 8150A and 9140A with deep BVRIz broadband imaging to select high-redshift galaxy candidates over an area of 4180 square arcmin. The goal was to obtain a uniform selection of comparable depth over the 7 targeted fields in the two filters. For the GOODS-N region of the HDF-N field, we also selected candidates using a 120A filter centered at 9210A. We made spectroscopic observations with Keck DEIMOS of nearly all the candidates to obtain the final sample of Ly alpha emitters. At the 3.3A resolution of the DEIMOS observations the asymmetric profile for Ly alpha emission with its steep blue fall-off can be clearly seen in the spectra of nearly all the galaxies. We show that the spectral profiles are surprisingly similar for many of the galaxies and that the composite spectral profiles are nearly identical at z=5.7 and z=6.5. We analyze the distributions of line widths and Ly alpha equivalent widths and find that the lines are marginally narrower at the higher redshift, with median values of 0.77A at z=6.5 and 0.92A at z=5.7. The line widths have a dependence on the Ly alpha luminosity of the form L(L alpha)^(0.3). We compare the surface densities and the luminosity functions at the two redshifts and find that there is a multiplicative factor of 2 decrease in the number density of bright Ly alpha emitters from z=5.7 to z=6.5, while the characteristic luminosity is unchanged.
  • We present observations and analysis of the broadband afterglow of Swift GRB 071025. Using optical and infrared (RIYJHK) photometry, we derive a photometric redshift of 4.4 < z < 5.2; at this redshift our simultaneous multicolour observations begin at ~30 s after the GRB trigger in the host frame and during the initial rising phase of the afterglow. We associate the light curve peak at 580 s in the observer frame with the formation of the forward shock, giving an estimate of the initial Lorentz factor Gamma_0 ~ 200. The red spectral energy distribution (even in regions not affected by the Lyman-alpha break) provides secure evidence of a large dust column. However, the inferred extinction curve shows a prominent flat component between 2000-3000 Angstroms in the rest-frame, inconsistent with any locally observed template but well-fit by models of dust formed by supernovae. Time-dependent fits to the extinction profile reveal no evidence of dust destruction and limit the decrease in the extinction column to Delta A_3000 < 0.54 mag after t = 50 s in the rest frame. Our observations provide evidence of a transition in dust properties at z~5, in agreement with studies of high-z quasars, and suggest that SN-formed dust continues to dominate the opacity of typical galaxies at this redshift.
  • We report on the stellar content of the COSMOS two degree field, as derived from a rigorous star/galaxy separation approach developed for using stellar sources to define the point spread function variation map used in a study of weak galaxy lensing. The catalog obtained in one filter from the ACS (Advanced Camera for Survey on the Hubble Space Telescope) is cross-identified with ground based multi-wavelength catalogs. The classification is reliable to magnitude $F_{814W}=24$ and the sample is complete even fainter. We construct a color-magnitude diagram and color histograms and compare them with predictions of a standard model of population synthesis. We find features corresponding to the halo subdwarf main sequence turnoff, the thick disk, and the thin disk. This data set provides constraints on the thick disk and spheroid density laws and on the IMF at low mass. We find no evidence of a sharp spheroid edge out to this distance. We identify a blue population of white dwarfs with counts that agree with model predictions. We find a hint for a possible slight stellar overdensity at about 22-34 kpc but the data are not strong enough at present to claim detection of a stream feature in the halo (abridged).
  • We report on the discovery of a very narrow-line star forming object beyond redshift of 5. Using the prime-focus camera, Suprime-Cam, on the 8.2 m Subaru telescope together with a narrow-passband filter centered at $\lambda_{\rm c}$ = 8150 \AA with passband of $\Delta\lambda$ = 120 \AA, we have obtained a very deep image of the field surrounding the quasar SDSSp J104433.04$-$012502.2 at a redshift of 5.74. Comparing this image with optical broad-band images, we have found an object with a very strong emission line. Our follow-up optical spectroscopy has revealed that this source is at a redshift of $z=5.655\pm0.002$, forming stars at a rate $\sim 13 ~ h_{0.7}^{-2} ~ M_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. Remarkably, the velocity dispersion of Ly$\alpha$-emitting gas is only 22 km s$^{-1}$. Since a blue half of the Ly$\alpha$ emission could be absorbed by neutral hydrogen gas, perhaps in the system, a modest estimate of the velocity dispersion may be $\gtrsim$ 44 km s$^{-1}$. Together with a linear size of 7.7 $h_{0.7}^{-1}$ kpc, we estimate a lower limit of the dynamical mass of this object to be $\sim 2 \times 10^9 M_\odot$. It is thus suggested that LAE J1044$-$0123 is a star-forming dwarf galaxy (i.e., a subgalactic object or a building block) beyond redshift 5 although we cannot exclude a possibility that most Ly$\alpha$ emission is absorbed by the red damping wing of neutral intergalactic matter.
  • During the course of our deep optical imaging survey for Ly alpha emitters at z approximately 5.7 in the field around the z=5.74 quasar SDSSp J104433.04-012502.2, we have found a candidate strong emission-line source. Follow-up optical spectroscopy shows that the emission line profile of this object is asymmetric, showing excess red-wing emission. These properties are consistent with an identification of Ly alpha emission at a redshift of z=5.687 +/- 0.002. The observed broad line width, Delta V_{FWHM} ~= 340 km s^{-1} and excess red-wing emission also suggest that this object hosts a galactic superwind.