• Phase-shift differences and amplitude ratios of the outgoing $s$ and $d$ continuum wave packets generated by two-photon ionization of helium atoms are determined from the photoelectron angular distributions obtained using velocity map imaging. Helium atoms are ionized with ultrashort extreme-ultraviolet free-electron laser pulses with a photon energy of 20.3, 21.3, 23.0, and 24.3 eV, produced by the SPring-8 Compact SASE Source test accelerator. The measured values of the phase-shift differences are distinct from scattering phase-shift differences when the photon energy is tuned to an excited level or Rydberg manifold. The difference stems from the competition between resonant and non-resonant paths in two-photon ionization by ultrashort pulses. Since the competition can be controlled in principle by the pulse shape, the present results illustrate a new way to tailor the continuum wave packet.
  • We analyze the temporal variation of the diurnal anisotropy of sub-TeV cosmic ray intensity observed with the Matsushiro (Japan) underground muon detector over two full solar activity cycles in 1985-2008. The average sidereal amplitude over the entire period is 0.034+-0.003 %, which is roughly one third of the amplitude reported from AS and deep-underground muon experiments monitoring multi-TeV GCR intensity suggesting a significant attenuation of the anisotropy due to the solar modulation. We find, on the other hand, only weak correlations either with the solar activity- or magnetic-cycles. We examine the temporal variation of the "single-band valley depth" (SBVD) quoted by the Milagro experiment and, by contrast with recent Milagro reports, we find no steady increase in the Matsushiro observations in a 7-year period between 2000 and 2007. We suggest, therefore, that the steady increase of the SBVD reported by the Milagro experiment is not caused by the decreasing solar modulation in the declining phase of the 23rd solar activity cycle.
  • The sidereal anisotropy of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity observed with the Tibet Air Shower (AS) experiment still awaits theoretical interpretation. The observed global feature of the anisotropy is well reproduced by a superposition of the bi-directional and uni-directional flows (BDF and UDF, respectively) of GCRs. If the orientation of the deduced BDF represents the orientation of the local interstellar magnetic field (LISMF), as indicated by best-fitting a model to the data, the UDF deviating from the BDF orientation implies a significant contribution from the streaming perpendicular to the LISMF. This perpendicular streaming is probably due to the drift anisotropy, because the contribution from the perpendicular diffusion is expected to be much smaller than the drift effect. The large amplitude deduced for the UDF indicates a large spatial gradient of the GCR density. We suggest that such a density gradient can be expected at the heliosphere sitting close to the boundary of the Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC), if the LIC is expanding. The spatial distribution of GCR density in the LIC reaches a stationary state because of the balance between the inward cross-field diffusion and the adiabatic cooling due to the expansion. We derive the steady-state distribution of GCR density in the LIC based on radial transport of GCRs in a spherical LIC expanding at a constant rate. By comparing the expected gradient with the observation by Tibet experiment, we estimate the perpendicular diffusion coefficient of multi-TeV GCRs in the local interstellar space.