• A. De Angelis, V. Tatischeff, I. A. Grenier, J. McEnery, M. Mallamaci, M. Tavani, U. Oberlack, L. Hanlon, R. Walter, A. Argan, P. Von Ballmoos, A. Bulgarelli, A. Bykov, M. Hernanz, G. Kanbach, I. Kuvvetli, M. Pearce, A. Zdziarski, J. Conrad, G. Ghisellini, A. Harding, J. Isern, M. Leising, F. Longo, G. Madejski, M. Martinez, M. N. Mazziotta, J. M. Paredes, M. Pohl, R. Rando, M. Razzano, A. Aboudan, M. Ackermann, A. Addazi, M. Ajello, C. Albertus, J. M. Alvarez, G. Ambrosi, S. Anton, L. A. Antonelli, A. Babic, B. Baibussinov, M. Balbo, L. Baldini, S. Balman, C. Bambi, U. Barres de Almeida, J. A. Barrio, R. Bartels, D. Bastieri, W. Bednarek, D. Bernard, E. Bernardini, T. Bernasconi, B. Bertucci, A. Biland, E. Bissaldi, M. Boettcher, V. Bonvicini, V. Bosch Ramon, E. Bottacini, V. Bozhilov, T. Bretz, M. Branchesi, V. Brdar, T. Bringmann, A. Brogna, C. Budtz Jorgensen, G. Busetto, S. Buson, M. Busso, A. Caccianiga, S. Camera, R. Campana, P. Caraveo, M. Cardillo, P. Carlson, S. Celestin, M. Cermeno, A. Chen, C. C Cheung, E. Churazov, S. Ciprini, A. Coc, S. Colafrancesco, A. Coleiro, W. Collmar, P. Coppi, R. Curado da Silva, S. Cutini, F. DAmmando, B. De Lotto, D. de Martino, A. De Rosa, M. Del Santo, L. Delgado, R. Diehl, S. Dietrich, A. D. Dolgov, A. Dominguez, D. Dominis Prester, I. Donnarumma, D. Dorner, M. Doro, M. Dutra, D. Elsaesser, M. Fabrizio, A. FernandezBarral, V. Fioretti, L. Foffano, V. Formato, N. Fornengo, L. Foschini, A. Franceschini, A. Franckowiak, S. Funk, F. Fuschino, D. Gaggero, G. Galanti, F. Gargano, D. Gasparrini, R. Gehrz, P. Giammaria, N. Giglietto, P. Giommi, F. Giordano, M. Giroletti, G. Ghirlanda, N. Godinovic, C. Gouiffes, J. E. Grove, C. Hamadache, D. H. Hartmann, M. Hayashida, A. Hryczuk, P. Jean, T. Johnson, J. Jose, S. Kaufmann, B. Khelifi, J. Kiener, J. Knodlseder, M. Kole, J. Kopp, V. Kozhuharov, C. Labanti, S. Lalkovski, P. Laurent, O. Limousin, M. Linares, E. Lindfors, M. Lindner, J. Liu, S. Lombardi, F. Loparco, R. LopezCoto, M. Lopez Moya, B. Lott, P. Lubrano, D. Malyshev, N. Mankuzhiyil, K. Mannheim, M. J. Marcha, A. Marciano, B. Marcote, M. Mariotti, M. Marisaldi, S. McBreen, S. Mereghetti, A. Merle, R. Mignani, G. Minervini, A. Moiseev, A. Morselli, F. Moura, K. Nakazawa, L. Nava, D. Nieto, M. Orienti, M. Orio, E. Orlando, P. Orleanski, S. Paiano, R. Paoletti, A. Papitto, M. Pasquato, B. Patricelli, M. A. PerezGarcia, M. Persic, G. Piano, A. Pichel, M. Pimenta, C. Pittori, T. Porter, J. Poutanen, E. Prandini, N. Prantzos, N. Produit, S. Profumo, F. S. Queiroz, S. Raino, A. Raklev, M. Regis, I. Reichardt, Y. Rephaeli, J. Rico, W. Rodejohann, G. Rodriguez Fernandez, M. Roncadelli, L. Roso, A. Rovero, R. Ruffini, G. Sala, M. A. SanchezConde, A. Santangelo, P. Saz Parkinson, T. Sbarrato, A. Shearer, R. Shellard, K. Short, T. Siegert, C. Siqueira, P. Spinelli, A. Stamerra, S. Starrfield, A. Strong, I. Strumke, F. Tavecchio, R. Taverna, T. Terzic, D. J. Thompson, O. Tibolla, D. F. Torres, R. Turolla, A. Ulyanov, A. Ursi, A. Vacchi, J. Van den Abeele, G. Vankova Kirilovai, C. Venter, F. Verrecchia, P. Vincent, X. Wang, C. Weniger, X. Wu, G. Zaharijas, L. Zampieri, S. Zane, S. Zimmer, A. Zoglauer, the eASTROGAM collaboration
    e-ASTROGAM (enhanced ASTROGAM) is a breakthrough Observatory space mission, with a detector composed by a Silicon tracker, a calorimeter, and an anticoincidence system, dedicated to the study of the non-thermal Universe in the photon energy range from 0.3 MeV to 3 GeV - the lower energy limit can be pushed to energies as low as 150 keV for the tracker, and to 30 keV for calorimetric detection. The mission is based on an advanced space-proven detector technology, with unprecedented sensitivity, angular and energy resolution, combined with polarimetric capability. Thanks to its performance in the MeV-GeV domain, substantially improving its predecessors, e-ASTROGAM will open a new window on the non-thermal Universe, making pioneering observations of the most powerful Galactic and extragalactic sources, elucidating the nature of their relativistic outflows and their effects on the surroundings. With a line sensitivity in the MeV energy range one to two orders of magnitude better than previous generation instruments, e-ASTROGAM will determine the origin of key isotopes fundamental for the understanding of supernova explosion and the chemical evolution of our Galaxy. The mission will provide unique data of significant interest to a broad astronomical community, complementary to powerful observatories such as LIGO-Virgo-GEO600-KAGRA, SKA, ALMA, E-ELT, TMT, LSST, JWST, Athena, CTA, IceCube, KM3NeT, and LISA.
  • We present results from {\gamma}-ray observations of the Coma cluster incorporating 6 years of Fermi-LAT data and the newly released {\emph{Pass 8}} event-level analysis. Our analysis of the region reveals low-significance residual structures within the virial radius of the cluster that are too faint for a detailed investigation with the current data. Using a likelihood approach that is free of assumptions on the spectral shape we derive upper limits on the {\gamma}-ray flux that is expected from energetic particle interactions in the cluster. We also consider a benchmark spatial and spectral template motivated by models in which the observed radio halo is mostly emission by secondary electrons. In this case, the median expected and observed upper limits for the flux above 100 MeV are $1.7\times10^{-9}\,\mathrm{ph\,cm^{-2}\,s^{-1}}$ and $5.2\times10^{-9}\,\mathrm{ph\,cm^{-2}\,s^{-1}}$ respectively (the latter corresponds to residual emission at the level of 1.8{\sigma}). These bounds are comparable to or higher than predicted levels of hadronic gamma-ray emission in cosmic-ray models with or without reacceleration of secondary electrons, although direct comparisons are sensitive to assumptions regarding the origin and propagation mode of cosmic rays and magnetic field properties. The minimal expected {\gamma}-ray flux from radio and star-forming galaxies within the Coma cluster is roughly an order of magnitude below the median sensitivity of our analysis.
  • Statistical measures of galaxy clusters are sensitive to neutrino masses in the sub-eV range. We explore the possibility of using cluster number counts from the ongoing PLANCK/SZ and future cosmic-variance-limited surveys to constrain neutrino masses from CMB data alone. The precision with which the total neutrino mass can be determined from SZ number counts is limited mostly by uncertainties in the cluster mass function and intracluster gas evolution; these are explicitly accounted for in our analysis. We find that projected results from the PLANCK/SZ survey can be used to determine the total neutrino mass with a (1\sigma) uncertainty of 0.06 eV, assuming it is in the range 0.1-0.3 eV, and the survey detection limit is set at the 5\sigma significance level. Our results constitute a significant improvement on the limits expected from PLANCK/CMB lensing measurements, 0.15 eV. Based on expected results from future cosmic-variance-limited (CVL) SZ survey we predict a 1\sigma uncertainty of 0.04 eV, a level comparable to that expected when CMB lensing extraction is carried out with the same experiment. A few percent uncertainty in the mass function parameters could result in up to a factor \sim 2-3 degradation of our PLANCK and CVL forecasts. Our analysis shows that cluster number counts provide a viable complementary cosmological probe to CMB lensing constraints on the total neutrino mass.
  • The growth of structure in the universe begins at the time of radiation-matter equality, which corresponds to energy scales of $\sim 0.4 eV$. All tracers of dark matter evolution are expected to be sensitive to neutrino masses on this and smaller scales. Here we explore the possibility of using cluster number counts and power spectrum obtained from ongoing SZ surveys to constrain neutrino masses. Specifically, we forecast the capability of ongoing measurements with the PLANCK satellite and the ground-based SPT experiment, as well as measurements with the proposed EPIC satellite, to set interesting bounds on neutrino masses from their respective SZ surveys. We also consider an ACT-like CMB experiment that covers only a few hundred ${\rm deg^{2}}$ also to explore the tradeoff between the survey area and sensitivity and what effect this may have on inferred neutrino masses. We find that for such an experiment a shallow survey is preferable over a deep and low-noise scanning scheme. We also find that projected results from the PLANCK SZ survey can, in principle, be used to determine the total neutrino mass with a ($1\sigma$) uncertainty of $0.28 eV$, if the detection limit of a cluster is set at the $5\sigma$ significance level. This is twice as large as the limits expected from PLANCK CMB lensing measurements. The corresponding limits from the SPT and EPIC surveys are $\sim 0.44 eV$ and $\sim 0.12 eV$, respectively. Mapping an area of 200 deg$^{2}$, ACT measurements are predicted to attain a $1\sigma$ uncertainty of 0.61 eV; expanding the observed area to 4,000 deg$^{2}$ will decrease the uncertainty to 0.36 eV.
  • Measurement sensitivity in the energetic gamma-ray region has improved considerably, and is about to increase further in the near future, motivating a detailed calculation of high-energy (>100 MeV) and very-high-energy (VHE: >100 GeV) gamma-ray emission from the nearby starburst galaxy NGC253. Adopting the convection-diffusion model for energetic electron and proton propagation, and accounting for all the relevant hadronic and leptonic processes, we determine the steady-state energy distributions of these particles by a detailed numerical treatment. The electron distribution is directly normalized by the measured synchrotron radio emission from the central starburst region; a commonly expected theoretical relation is then used to normalize the proton spectrum in this region. Doing so fully specifies the electron spectrum throughout the galactic disk, and with an assumed spatial profile of the magnetic field, the predicted radio emission from the full disk matches well the observed spectrum, confirming the validity of our treatment. The resulting radiative yields of both particles are calculated; the integrated HE and VHE fluxes from the entire disk are predicted to be f(>100 MeV)~2x10^-8 cm^-2 s^-1 and f(>100 GeV)~4x10^-12 cm^-2 s^-1, respectively. We discuss the feasibility of measuring emission at these levels with the space-borne Fermi and the ground-based Cherenkov telescopes.
  • Mapping CMB polarization is an essential ingredient of current cosmological research. Particularly challenging is the measurement of an extremely weak B-mode polarization that can potentially yield unique insight on inflation. Achieving this objective requires very precise measurements of the secondary polarization components on both large and small angular scales. Scattering of the CMB in galaxy clusters induces several polarization effects whose measurements can probe cluster properties. Perhaps more important are levels of the statistical polarization signals from the population of clusters. Power spectra of five of these polarization components are calculated and compared with the primary polarization spectra. These spectra peak at multipoles $\ell \geq 3000$, and attain levels that are unlikely to appreciably contaminate the primordial polarization signals.
  • We describe a subgrid model for including galaxies into hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of galaxy cluster evolution. Each galaxy construct- or galcon- is modeled as a physically extended object within which star formation, galactic winds, and ram pressure stripping of gas are modeled analytically. Galcons are initialized at high redshift (z~3) after galaxy dark matter halos have formed but before the cluster has virialized. Each galcon moves self-consistently within the evolving cluster potential and injects mass, metals, and energy into intracluster (IC) gas through a well-resolved spherical interface layer. We have implemented galcons into the Enzo adaptive mesh refinement code and carried out a simulation of cluster formation in a LambdaCDM universe. With our approach, we are able to economically follow the impact of a large number of galaxies on IC gas. We compare the results of the galcon simulation with a second, more standard simulation where star formation and feedback are treated using a popular heuristic prescription. One advantage of the galcon approach is explicit control over the star formation history of cluster galaxies. Using a galactic SFR derived from the cosmic star formation density, we find the galcon simulation produces a lower stellar fraction, a larger gas core radius, a more isothermal temperature profile, and a flatter metallicity gradient than the standard simulation, in better agreement with observations.
  • We provide a quantitative assessment of the probability distribution function of the concentration parameter of galaxy clusters. We do so by using the probability distribution function of halo formation times, calculated by means of the excursion set formalism, and a formation redshift-concentration scaling derived from results of N-body simulations. Our results suggest that the observed high concentrations of several clusters are quite unlikely in the standard Lambda CDM cosmological model, but that due to various inherent uncertainties, the statistical range of the predicted distribution may be significantly wider than commonly acknowledged. In addition, the probability distribution function of the Einstein radius of A1689 is evaluated, confirming that the observed value of ~45" +/- 5" is very improbable in the currently favoured cosmological model. If, however, a variance of ~20% in the theoretically predicted value of the virial radius is assumed, than the discrepancy is much weaker. The measurement of similarly large Einstein radii in several other clusters would pose a difficulty to the standard model. If so, earlier formation of the large scale structure would be required, in accord with predictions of some quintessence models. We have indeed verified that in a viable early dark energy model large Einstein radii are predicted in as many as a few tens of high-mass clusters.
  • We present the work of an international team at the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern that worked together to review the current observational and theoretical status of the non-virialised X-ray emission components in clusters of galaxies. The subject is important for the study of large-scale hierarchical structure formation and to shed light on the "missing baryon" problem. The topics of the team work include thermal emission and absorption from the warm-hot intergalactic medium, non-thermal X-ray emission in clusters of galaxies, physical processes and chemical enrichment of this medium and clusters of galaxies, and the relationship between all these processes. One of the main goals of the team is to write and discuss a series of review papers on this subject. These reviews are intended as introductory text and reference for scientists wishing to work actively in this field. The team consists of sixteen experts in observations, theory and numerical simulations.
  • Recent observations of high energy (> 20 keV) X-ray emission in a few clusters of galaxies broaden our knowledge of physical phenomena in the intracluster space. This emission is likely to be nonthermal, probably resulting from Compton scattering of relativistic electrons by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. Direct evidence for the presence of relativistic electrons in some 50 clusters comes from measurements of extended radio emission in their central regions. We briefly review the main results from observations of extended regions of radio emission, and Faraday rotation measurements of background and cluster radio sources. The main focus of the review are searches for nonthermal X-ray emission conducted with past and currently operating satellites, which yielded appreciable evidence for nonthermal emission components in the spectra of a few clusters. This evidence is clearly not unequivocal, due to substantial observational and systematic uncertainties, in addition to virtually complete lack of spatial information. If indeed the emission has its origin in Compton scattering of relativistic electrons by the CMB, then the mean magnetic field strength and density of relativistic electrons in the cluster can be directly determined. Knowledge of these basic nonthermal quantities is valuable for the detailed description of processes in intracluster gas and for the origin of magnetic fields.
  • We review observations of extended regions of radio emission in clusters; these include diffuse emission in `relics', and the large central regions commonly referred to as `halos'. The spectral observations, as well as Faraday rotation measurements of background and cluster radio sources, provide the main evidence for large-scale intracluster magnetic fields and significant densities of relativistic electrons. Implications from these observations on acceleration mechanisms of these electrons are reviewed, including turbulent and shock acceleration, and also the origin of some of the electrons in collisions of relativistic protons by ambient protons in the (thermal) gas. Improved knowledge of non-thermal phenomena in clusters requires more extensive and detailed radio measurements; we briefly review prospects for future observations.
  • In this paper we review the possible radiation mechanisms for the observed non-thermal emission in clusters of galaxies, with a primary focus on the radio and hard X-ray emission. We show that the difficulty with the non-thermal, non-relativistic Bremsstrahlung model for the hard X-ray emission, first pointed out by Petrosian (2001) using a cold target approximation, is somewhat alleviated when one treats the problem more exactly by including the fact that the background plasma particle energies are on average a factor of 10 below the energy of the non-thermal particles. This increases the lifetime of the non-thermal particles, and as a result decreases the extreme energy requirement, but at most by a factor of three. We then review the synchrotron and so-called inverse Compton emission by relativistic electrons, which when compared with observations can constrain the value of the magnetic field and energy of relativistic electrons. This model requires a low value of the magnetic field which is far from the equipartition value. We briefly review the possibilities of gamma-ray emission and prospects for GLAST observations. We also present a toy model of the non-thermal electron spectra that are produced by the acceleration mechanisms discussed in an accompanying paper.
  • In the standard Lambda CDM cosmological model with a Gaussian primordial density fluctuation field, the relatively low value of the mass variance parameter (sigma_8=0.74{+0.05}{-0.06}, obtained from the WMAP 3-year data) results in a reduced likelihood that the measured level of CMB anisotropy on the scales of clusters is due to the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (S-Z) effect. To assess the feasibility of producing higher levels of S-Z power, we explore two alternative models which predict higher cluster abundance. In the first model the primordial density field has a chi^2_1 distribution, whereas in the second an early dark energy component gives rise to the desired higher cluster abundance. We carry out the necessary detailed calculations of the levels of S-Z power spectra, cluster number counts, and angular 2-point correlation function of clusters, and compare (in a self-consistent way) their predicted redshift distributions. Our results provide a sufficient basis upon which the viability of the three models may be tested by future high quality measurements.
  • Two little explored aspects of Compton scattering of the CMB in clusters are discussed: The statistical properties of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (S-Z) effect in the context of a non-Gaussian density fluctuation field, and the polarization patterns in a hydrodynamcially-simulated cluster. We have calculated and compared the power spectrum and cluster number counts predicted within the framework of two density fields that yield different cluster mass functions at high redshifts. This is done for the usual Press & Schechter mass function, which is based on a Gaussian density fluctuation field, and for a mass function based on a chi^2-distributed density field. We quantify the significant differences in the respective integrated S-Z observables in these two models. S-Z polarization levels and patterns strongly depend on the non-uniform distributions of intracluster gas and on peculiar and internal velocities. We have therefore calculated the patterns of two polarization components that are produced when the CMB is doubly scattered in a simulated cluster. These are found to be very different than the patterns calculated based on spherical clusters with uniform structure and simplified gas distribution.
  • The main statistical properties of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (S-Z) effect - the power spectrum, cluster number counts, and angular correlation function - are calculated and compared within the framework of two density fields which differ in their predictions of the cluster mass function at high redshifts. We do so for the usual Press and Schechter mass function, which is derived on the basis of a Gaussian density fluctuation field, and for a mass function based on a chi^2 distributed density field. These three S-Z observables are found to be very significantly dependent on the choice of the mass function. The different predictions of the Gaussian and non-Gaussian density fields are probed in detail by investigating the behaviour of the three S-Z observables in terms of cluster mass and redshift. The formation time distribution of clusters is also demonstrated to be sensitive to the underlying mass function. A semi-quantitative assessment is given of its impact on the concentration parameter and the temperature of intracluster gas.
  • Scattering of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) in clusters of galaxies polarizes the radiation. We explore several polarization components which have their origin in the kinematic quadrupole moments induced by the motion of the scattering electrons, either directed or random. Polarization levels and patterns are determined in a cluster simulated by the hydrodynamical Enzo code. We find that polarization signals can be as high as $\sim 1 \mu$K, a level that may be detectable by upcoming CMB experiments.
  • This brief, general review the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (S-Z) effect includes a description of the calculation of the total intensity change and polarization components, a discussion of the basic properties of the S-Z power spectrum and cluster number counts, and a summary of the main observational results.
  • X-ray background surveys indicate the likely presence of diffuse warm gas in the Local Super Cluster (LSC), in accord with expectations from hydrodynamical simulations. We assess several other manifestations of warm LSC gas; these include anisotropy in the spatial pattern of cluster Sunyaev-Zeldovich (S-Z) counts, its impact on the CMB temperature power spectrum at the lowest multipoles, and implications on measurements of the S-Z effect in and around the Virgo cluster.
  • Based on recent work on spectral decomposition of the emission of star-forming galaxies, we assess whether the integrated 2-10 keV emission from high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), L_{2-10}^{HMXB}, can be used as a reliable estimator of ongoing star formation rate (SFR). Using a sample of 46 local (z < 0.1) star forming galaxies, and spectral modeling of ASCA, BeppoSAX, and XMM-Newton data, we demonstrate the existence of a linear SFR-L_{2-10}^{HMXB} relation which holds over ~5 decades in X-ray luminosity and SFR. The total 2-10 keV luminosity is not a precise SFR indicator because at low SFR (i.e., in normal and moderately-starbursting galaxies) it is substantially affected by the emission of low-mass X-ray binaries, which do not trace the current SFR due to their long evolution lifetimes, while at very high SFR (i.e., for very luminous FIR-selected galaxies) it is frequently affected by the presence of strongly obscured AGNs. The availability of purely SB-powered galaxies - whose 2-10 keV emission is mainly due to HMXBs - allows us to properly calibrate the SFR-L_{2-10}^{HMXB} relation. The SFR-L_{2-10}^{HMXB} relation holds also for distant (z ~ 1) galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field North sample, for which we lack spectral information, but whose SFR can be estimated from deep radio data. If confirmed by more detailed observations, it may be possible to use the deduced relation to identify distant galaxies that are X-ray overluminous for their (independently estimated) SFR, and are therefore likely to hide strongly absorbed AGNs.
  • The strong dependence of the mass variance parameter, sigma_8, on the adopted cluster mass-temperature relation is explored. A recently compiled X-ray cluster catalog and various mass-temperature relations are used to derive the corresponding values of sigma_8. Calculations of the power spectrum of the CMB anisotropy induced by the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and cluster number counts are carried out in order to assess the need for a consistent choice of the mass-temperature scaling and the parameter sigma_8. We find that the consequences of inconsistent choice of the mass-temperature relation and sigma_8 could be quite substantial, including a considerable mis-estimation of the magnitude of the power spectrum and cluster number counts. Our results can partly explain the large scatter between published estimates of the power spectrum and number counts. We also show that the range of values of the power-law index in the scaling C_l ~ sigma_8^[6-7] deduced in previous studies is likely overestimated; we obtain a more moderate dependence, C_l ~ sigma_8^[4].
  • The Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect was previously measured in the Coma cluster by the Owens Valley Radio Observatory and Millimeter and IR Testa Grigia Observatory experiments and recently also with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe satellite. We assess the consistency of these results and their implications on the feasibility of high-frequency SZ work with ground-based telescopes. The unique data set from the combined measurements at six frequency bands is jointly analyzed, resulting in a best-fit value for the Thomson optical depth at the cluster center, tau_{0}=(5.35 \pm 0.67) 10^{-3}. The combined X-ray and SZ determined properties of the gas are used to determine the Hubble constant. For isothermal gas with a \beta density profile we derive H_0 = 84 \pm 26 km/(s\cdot Mpc); the (1\sigma) error includes only observational SZ and X-ray uncertainties.
  • We have deduced the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature in the Coma cluster (A1656, $z=0.0231$), and in A2163 ($z=0.203$) from spectral measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect over four passbands at radio and microwave frequencies. The resulting temperatures at these redshifts are $T_{Coma} = 2.789^{+0.080}_{-0.065}$ K and $T_{A2163} = 3.377^{+0.101}_{-0.102}$ K, respectively. These values confirm the expected relation $T(z)=T_{0}(1+z)$, where $T_{0}= 2.725 \pm 0.002$ K is the value measured by the COBE/FIRAS experiment. Alternative scaling relations that are conjectured in non-standard cosmologies can be constrained by the data; for example, if $T(z) = T_{0}(1+z)^{1-a}$ or $T(z)=T_{0}[1+(1+d)z]$, then $a=-0.16^{+0.34}_{-0.32}$ and $d = 0.17 \pm 0.36$ (at 95% confidence). We briefly discuss future prospects for more precise SZ measurements of $T(z)$ at higher redshifts.
  • We report the first detailed X-ray and optical observations of the medium-distant cluster A33 obtained with the Beppo-SAX satellite and with the UH 2.2m and Keck II telescopes at Mauna Kea. The information deduced from X-ray and optical imaging and spectroscopic data allowed us to identify the X-ray source 1SAXJ0027.2-1930 as the X-ray counterpart of the A33 cluster. The faint, $F_{2-10 keV} \approx 2.4 \times 10^{-13} \ergscm2$, X-ray source 1SAXJ0027.2-1930, $\sim 2$ arcmin away from the optical position of the cluster as given in the Abell catalogue, is identified with the central region of A33. Based on six cluster galaxy redshifts, we determine the redshift of A33, $z=0.2409$; this is lower than the value derived by Leir and Van Den Bergh (1977). The source X-ray luminosity, $L_{2-10 keV} = 7.7 \times 10^{43} \ergs$, and intracluster gas temperature, $T = 2.9$ keV, make this cluster interesting for cosmological studies of the cluster $L_X-T$ relation at intermediate redshifts. Two other X-ray sources in the A33 field are identified. An AGN at z$=$0.2274, and an M-type star, whose emission are blended to form an extended X-ray emission $\sim 4$ arcmin north of the A33 cluster. A third possibly point-like X-ray source detected $\sim 3$ arcmin north-west of A33 lies close to a spiral galaxy at z$=$0.2863 and to an elliptical galaxy at the same redshift as the cluster.
  • New BeppoSAX observations of the nearby prototypical starburst galaxies NGC 253 and M82 are presented. A companion paper (Cappi et al. 1998;astro-ph/9809325) shows that the hard (2-10 keV) spectrum of both galaxies, extracted from the source central regions, is best described by a thermal emission model with kT ~ 6-9 keV and abundances ~ 0.1-0.3 solar. The spatial analysis yields clear evidence that this emission is extended in NGC 253, and possibly also in M82. This quite clearly rules out a LLAGN as the main responsible for their hard X-ray emission. Significant contribution from point-sources (i.e. X-ray binaries (XRBs) and Supernovae Remnants (SNRs)) cannot be excluded; neither can we at present reliably estimate the level of Compton emission. However, we argue that such contributions shouldn't affect our main conclusion, i.e., that the BeppoSAX results show, altogether, compelling evidence for the existence of a very hot, metal-poor interstellar plasma in both galaxies.
  • Preliminary results obtained from BeppoSAX observation of the starburst galaxy NGC253 are presented. X-ray emission from the object is clearly extended but most of the emission is concentrated on the optical nucleus. Preliminary analysis of the LECS and MECS data obtained using the central 4' region indicates that the continuum is well fitted by two thermal components at 0.9 keV and 7 keV. Fe K line at 6.7 keV is detected for the first time in this galaxy; the line has an equivalent width of ~300eV. The line energy and the shape of the 2-10 keV continuum strongly support thermal origin of the hard X-ray emission of NGC253. From the measurement of the Fe K line the abundances can be unambiguously constrained to ~0.25 the solar value. Other lines clearly detected are Si, S and Fe XVIII/Ne, in agreement with ASCA results.