• Background: The high momentum distribution of atoms in two spin-state ultra-cold atomic gases with strong short-range interactions between atoms with different spins, which can be described using Tan's contact, are dominated by short range pairs of different fermions and decreases as $k^{-4}$. In atomic nuclei the momentum distribution of nucleons above the Fermi momentum ($k>k_F \approx 250$ Mev/c) is also dominated by short rangecorrelated different-fermion (neutron-proton) pairs. Purpose: Compare high-momentum unlike-fermion momentum distributions in atomic and nuclear systems. Methods: We show that, for $k>k_F$ MeV/c, nuclear momentum distributions are proportional to that of the deuteron. We then examine the deuteron momentum distributions derived from a wide variety of modern nucleon-nucleon potentials that are consistent with $NN$-scattering data. Results: The high momentum tail of the deuteron momentum distribution, and hence of the nuclear momentum distributions appears to decrease as $k^{-4}$. This behavior is shown to arise from the effects of the tensor part of the nucleon-nucleon potential. In addition, when the dimensionless interaction strength for the atomic system is chosen to be similar to that of atomic nuclei, the probability for finding a short range different-fermion pair in both systems is the same. Conclusions: Although nuclei do not satisfy all of the conditions for Tan's contact, the observed similarity of the magnitude and $k^{-4}$ shape of nuclear and atomic momentum distributions is remarkable because these systems differ by about $20$ orders of magnitude in density. This similarity may lead to a greater understanding of nuclei and the density dependence of nuclear systems.
  • The ideal (i.e. noninteracting), homogeneous Fermi gas, with its characteristic sharp Fermi surface in the momentum distribution, is a fundamental concept relevant to the behavior of many systems. With trapped Fermi gases of ultracold atoms, one can realize and probe a nearly ideal Fermi gas, however these systems have a nonuniform density due to the confining potential. We show that the effect of the density variation, which typically washes out any semblance of a Fermi surface step in the momentum distribution, can be mitigated by selectively probing atoms near the center of a trapped gas. With this approach, we have directly measured a Fermi surface in momentum space for a nearly ideal gas, where the average density and temperature of the probed portion of the gas can be determined from the location and sharpness of the Fermi surface.
  • Two-photon processes that involve different sub-levels of the ground state of an atom, are highly sensitive to depopulation and decoherence within the ground state. For example, the spectral width of electromagnetically induced transparency resonances in $\Lambda-$type system, are strongly affected by the ground state depopulation and decoherence rates. We present a direct measurement of decay rates between hyperfine and Zeeman sub-levels in the ground state of $^{87}$Rb vapor. Similar to the relaxation-in-the-dark technique, pumping lasers are used to pre-align the atomic vapor in a well defined quantum state. The free propagation of the atomic state is monitored using a Ramsey-like method. Coherence times in the range 1-10 ms were measured for room temperature atomic vapor. In the range of the experimental parameters used in this study, the dominant process inducing Zeeman decoherence is the spin-exchange collisions between rubidium atoms.