• While recent advances in band theory and sample growth have expanded the series of extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR) semimetals in transition metal dipnictides $TmPn_2$ ($Tm$ = Ta, Nb; $Pn$ = P, As, Sb), the experimental study on their electronic structure and the origin of XMR is still absent. Here, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations and magnetotransport measurements, we performed a comprehensive investigation on MoAs$_2$, which is isostructural to the $TmPn_2$ family and also exhibits quadratic XMR. We resolve a clear band structure well agreeing with the predictions. Intriguingly, the unambiguously observed Fermi surfaces (FSs) are dominated by an open-orbit topology extending along both the [100] and [001] directions in the three-dimensional Brillouin zone. We further reveal the trivial topological nature of MoAs$_2$ by bulk parity analysis. Based on these results, we examine the proposed XMR mechanisms in other semimetals, and conclusively ascribe the origin of quadratic XMR in MoAs$_2$ to the carriers motion on the FSs with dominant open-orbit topology, innovating in the understanding of quadratic XMR in semimetals.
  • Topological Dirac and Weyl semimetals not only host quasiparticles analogous to the elementary fermionic particles in high-energy physics, but also have nontrivial band topology manifested by exotic Fermi arcs on the surface. Recent advances suggest new types of topological semimetals, in which spatial symmetries protect gapless electronic excitations without high-energy analogy. Here we observe triply-degenerate nodal points (TPs) near the Fermi level of WC, in which the low-energy quasiparticles are described as three-component fermions distinct from Dirac and Weyl fermions. We further observe the surface states whose constant energy contours are pairs of Fermi arcs connecting the surface projection of the TPs, proving the nontrivial topology of the newly identified semimetal state.
  • By employing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations, we performed a systematic investigation on the electronic structure of LaBi, which exhibits extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR), and is theoretically predicted to possess band anticrossing with nontrivial topological properties. Here, the observations of the Fermi-surface topology and band dispersions are similar to previous studies on LaSb [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 127204 (2016)], a topologically trivial XMR semimetal, except the existence of a band inversion along the $\Gamma$-$X$ direction, with one massless and one gapped Dirac-like surface state at the $X$ and $\Gamma$ points, respectively. The odd number of massless Dirac cones suggests that LaBi is analogous to the time-reversal $Z_2$ nontrivial topological insulator. These findings open up a new series for exploring novel topological states and investigating their evolution from the perspective of topological phase transition within the family of rare-earth monopnictides.
  • Condensed matter systems can host quasiparticle excitations that are analogues to elementary particles such as Majorana, Weyl, and Dirac fermions. Recent advances in band theory have expanded the classification of fermions in crystals, and revealed crystal symmetry-protected electron excitations that have no high-energy counterparts. Here, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we demonstrate the existence of a triply degenerate point in the electronic structure of MoP crystal, where the quasiparticle excitations are beyond the Majorana-Weyl-Dirac classification. Furthermore, we observe pairs of Weyl points in the bulk electronic structure coexisting with the 'new fermions', thus introducing a platform for studying the interplay between different types of fermions.
  • By combining angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and quantum oscillation measurements, we performed a comprehensive investigation on the electronic structure of LaSb, which exhibits near-quadratic extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR) without any sign of saturation at magnetic fields as high as 40 T. We clearly resolve one spherical and one intersecting-ellipsoidal hole Fermi surfaces (FSs) at the Brillouin zone (BZ) center $\Gamma$ and one ellipsoidal electron FS at the BZ boundary $X$. The hole and electron carriers calculated from the enclosed FS volumes are perfectly compensated, and the carrier compensation is unaffected by temperature. We further reveal that LaSb is topologically trivial but share many similarities with the Weyl semimetal TaAs family in the bulk electronic structure. Based on these results, we have examined the mechanisms that have been proposed so far to explain the near-quadratic XMR in semimetals.
  • Topological insulators (TIs) host novel states of quantum matter, distinguished from trivial insulators by the presence of nontrivial conducting boundary states connecting the valence and conduction bulk bands. Up to date, all the TIs discovered experimentally rely on the presence of either time reversal or symmorphic mirror symmetry to protect massless Dirac-like boundary states. Very recently, it has been theoretically proposed that several materials are a new type of TIs protected by nonsymmorphic symmetry, where glide-mirror can protect novel exotic surface fermions with hourglass-shaped dispersion. However, an experimental confirmation of such new nonsymmorphic TI (NSTI) is still missing. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we reveal that such hourglass topology exists on the (010) surface of crystalline KHgSb while the (001) surface has no boundary state, which is fully consistent with first-principles calculations. We thus experimentally demonstrate that KHgSb is a NSTI hosting hourglass fermions. By expanding the classification of topological insulators, this discovery opens a new direction in the research of nonsymmorphic topological properties of materials.
  • We report an angle-resolved photoemission investigation of optimally-doped Ca$_{0.33}$Na$_{0.67}$Fe$_2$As$_2$. The Fermi surface topology of this compound is similar to that of the well-studied Ba$_{0.6}$K$_{0.4}$Fe$_2$As$_2$ material, except for larger hole pockets resulting from a higher hole concentration per Fe atoms. We find that the quasi-nesting conditions are weakened in this compound as compared to Ba$_{0.6}$K$_{0.4}$Fe$_2$As$_2$. As with Ba$_{0.6}$K$_{0.4}$Fe$_2$As$_2$ though, we observe nearly isotropic superconducting gaps with Fermi surface-dependent magnitudes. A small variation in the gap size along the momentum direction perpendicular to the surface is found for one of the Fermi surfaces. Our superconducting gap results on all Fermi surface sheets fit simultaneously very well to a global gap function derived from a strong coupling approach, which contains only 2 global parameters.
  • We performed a combined angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy study of the electronic structure of electron-doped Ca$_{0.83}$La$_{0.17}$Fe$_2$As$_2$. A surface reconstruction associated with the dimerization of As atoms is observed directly in the real space, as well as the consequent band folding in the momentum space. Besides this band folding effect, the Fermi surface topology of this material is similar to that reported previously for BaFe$_{1.85}$Co$_{0.15}$As$_2$, with $\Gamma$-centred hole pockets quasi-nested to M-centred electron pockets by the antiferromagnetic wave vector. Although no superconducting gap is observed by ARPES possibly due to low superconducting volume fraction, a gap-like density of states depression of $7.7\pm 2.9$ meV is determined by scanning tunneling microscopy.
  • We performed a high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study on superconducting (SC) Tl$_{0.63}$K$_{0.37}$Fe$_{1.78}$Se$_2$ ($T_c=29$ K) in the whole Brillouin zone (BZ). In addition to a nearly isotropic $\sim$ 8.2 meV 2-dimensional (2D) SC gap ($2\Delta/k_BT_c\sim7$) on quasi-2D electron Fermi surfaces (FSs) located around M$(\pi,0,0)$-A$(\pi,0,\pi)$, we observe a $\sim 6.2$ meV isotropic SC gap ($2\Delta/k_BT_c\sim5$) on the Z-centered electron FS that rules out any d-wave pairing symmetry and rather favors an s-wave symmetry. All isotropic SC gap amplitudes can be fit by a single gap function derived from a local strong coupling approach suggesting an enhancement of the next-next neighbor exchange interaction in the ferrochalcogenide superconductors.
  • The superconducting gap is the fundamental parameter that characterizes the superconducting state, and its symmetry is a direct consequence of the mechanism responsible for Cooper pairing. Here we discuss about angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements of the superconducting gap in the Fe-based high-temperature superconductors. We show that the superconducting gap is Fermi surface dependent and nodeless with small anisotropy, or more precisely, a function of momentum. We show that while this observation is inconsistent with weak coupling approaches for superconductivity in these materials, it is well supported by strong coupling models and global superconducting gaps. We also suggest that the strong anisotropies measured by other probes sensitive to the residual density of states are not related to the pairing interaction itself, but rather emerge naturally from the smaller lifetime of the superconducting Cooper pairs that is a direct consequence of the momentum dependent interband scattering inherent to these materials.
  • In order to determine the orbital characters on the various Fermi surface pockets of the Fe-based superconductors Ba$_{0.6}$K$_{0.4}$Fe$_{2}$As$_{2}$ and FeSe$_{0.45}$Te$_{0.55}$, we introduce a method to calculate photoemission matrix elements. We compare our simulations to experimental data obtained with various experimental configurations of beam orientation and light polarization. We show that the photoemission intensity patterns revealed from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements of Fermi surface mappings and energy-momentum plots along high-symmetry lines exhibit asymmetries carrying precious information on the nature of the states probed, information that is destroyed after the data symmetrization process often performed in the analysis of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data. Our simulations are consistent with Fermi surfaces originating mainly from the $d_{xy}$, $d_{xz}$ and $d_{yz}$ orbitals in these materials.
  • We report a systematic angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study on Ba(Fe$_{1-x}$Ru$_x$)$_2$As$_2$ for a wide range of Ru concentrations (0.15 $\leq$ \emph{x} $\leq$ 0.74). We observed a crossover from two-dimension to three-dimension for some of the hole-like Fermi surfaces with Ru substitution and a large reduction in the mass renormalization close to optimal doping. These results suggest that isovalent Ru substitution has remarkable effects on the low-energy electron excitations, which are important for the evolution of superconductivity and antiferromagnetism in this system.
  • The iron-pnictide superconductors have a layered structureformed by stacks of FeAs planes from which the superconductivity originates. Given the multiband and quasi three-dimensional \cite{3D_SC} (3D) electronic structure of these high-temperature superconductors, knowledge of the quasi-3D superconducting (SC) gap is essential for understanding the superconducting mechanism. By using the \KZ-capability of angle-resolved photoemission, we completely determined the SC gap on all five Fermi surfaces (FSs) in three dimensions on \BKFAOP samples. We found a marked \KZ dispersion of the SC gap, which can derive only from interlayer pairing. Remarkably, the SC energy gaps can be described by a single 3D gap function with two energy scales characterizing the strengths of intralayer $\Delta_1$ and interlayer $\Delta_2$ pairing. The anisotropy ratio $\Delta_2/\Delta_1$, determined from the gap function, is close to the c-axis anisotropy ratio of the magnetic exchange coupling $J_c/J_{ab}$ in the parent compound \cite{NeutronParent}. The ubiquitous gap function for all the 3D FSs reveals that pairing is short-ranged and strongly constrain the possible pairing force in the pnictides. A suitable candidate could arise from short-range antiferromagnetic fluctuations.