• Circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) studies the interaction of artificial atoms, open transmission lines and electromagnetic resonators fabricated from superconducting electronics. While the theory of an artificial atom coupled to one mode of a resonator is well studied, considering multiple modes leads to divergences which are not well understood. Here, we introduce a first-principles model of a multimode resonator coupled to a Josephson junction atom. Studying the model in the absence of any cutoff, in which the coupling rate to mode number $n$ scales as $\sqrt{n}$ for $n$ up to $\infty$, we find that quantities such as the Lamb shift do not diverge due to a natural rescaling of the bare atomic parameters that arises directly from the circuit analysis. Introducing a cutoff in the coupling from a non-zero capacitance of the Josephson junction, we provide a physical interpretation of the decoupling of higher modes in the context of circuit analysis. In addition to explaining the convergence of the quantum Rabi model with no cutoff, our work also provides a useful framework for analyzing the ultra-strong coupling regime of multimode circuit QED.
  • We investigate superconducting interference device (SQUID) with two asymmetric Josephson junctions coupled to a mechanical resonator embedded in the loop of the SQUID. We quantize this system in the case when the frequency of the mechanical resonator is much lower than the cavity frequency of the SQUID and in the case when they are comparable. In the first case, the radiation pressure and cross-Kerr type interactions arise and are modified by asymmetry. Cross-Kerr type coupling is the leading term at the extremum points where radiation pressure is zero. In the second case, the main interaction is single-photon beam splitter, which exists only at finite asymmetry. Another interaction in this regime is of cross-Kerr type, which exists at all asymmetries, but generally much weaker than the beam splitter interaction. Increasing magnetic field can substantially enhance optomechanical couplings strength with the potential for the radiation pressure coupling to reach the single-photon strong coupling regime, even the ultrastrong coupling regime, in which the single-photon coupling rate exceeds the mechanical frequency.
  • The two-dimensional superconductor formed at the interface between the complex oxides, lanthanum aluminate (LAO) and strontium titanate (STO) has several intriguing properties that set it apart from conventional superconductors. Most notably, an electric field can be used to tune its critical temperature (T$_c$), revealing a dome-shaped phase diagram reminiscent of high T$_c$ superconductors. So far, experiments with oxide interfaces have measured quantities which probe only the magnitude of the superconducting order parameter and are not sensitive to its phase. Here, we perform phase-sensitive measurements by realizing the first superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) at the LAO/STO interface. Furthermore, we develop a new paradigm for the creation of superconducting circuit elements, where local gates enable in-situ creation and control of Josephson junctions. These gate-defined SQUIDs are unique in that the entire device is made from a single superconductor with purely electrostatic interfaces between the superconducting reservoir and the weak link. We complement our experiments with numerical simulations and show that the low superfluid density of this interfacial superconductor results in a large, gate-controllable kinetic inductance of the SQUID. Our observation of robust quantum interference opens up a new pathway to understand the nature of superconductivity at oxide interfaces.
  • With an increasing coupling between light and mechanics, nonlinearities begin to play an important role in optomechanics. We solve the quantum dynamics of an optomechanical system in the multi-photon strong coupling regime retaining nonlinear terms. This is achieved by performing a Schrieffer-Wolff transformation on the Hamiltonian including driving terms. The approach is valid away from the red- and blue-sideband drive. We show that the mechanical resonator displays self-sustained oscillations in regimes where the linearized model predicts instabilities, and that the amplitude of these oscillations is limited by the nonlinear terms. Related oscillations of the photon number are present due to frequency mixing of the shifted mechanical and cavity frequencies. This leads to additional peaks in the cavity's power spectral density. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to create phonon states with sub-Poissonian statistics when the system is red-detuned. This result is valid even with strong driving and with initial coherent states.
  • Measurements with variable system-detector interaction strength, ranging from weak to strong, have been recently reported in a number of electronic nanosystems. In several such instances many-body effects play a significant role. Here we consider the weak--to--strong crossover for a setup consisting of an electronic Mach-Zehnder interferometer, where a second interferometer is employed as a detector. In the context of a conditional which-path protocol, we define a generalized conditional value (GCV), and determine its full crossover between the regimes of weak and strong (projective) measurement. We find that the GCV has an oscillatory dependence on the system-detector interaction strength. These oscillations are a genuine many-body effect, and can be experimentally observed through the voltage dependence of cross current correlations.
  • We experimentally investigate the nonlinear response of a multilayer graphene resonator using a superconducting microwave cavity to detect its motion. The radiation pressure force is used to drive the mechanical resonator in an optomechanically induced transparency configuration. By varying the amplitudes of drive and probe tones, the mechanical resonator can be brought into a nonlinear limit. Using the calibration of the optomechanical coupling, we quantify the mechanical Duffing nonlinearity. By increasing the drive force, we observe a decrease in the mechanical dissipation rate at large amplitudes, suggesting a negative nonlinear damping mechanism in the graphene resonator. Increasing the optomechanical backaction, we observe a nonlinear regime not described by a Duffing response that includes new instabilities of the mechanical response.
  • We investigate theoretically in detail the non-linear effects in the response of an optical/microwave cavity coupled to a Duffing mechanical resonator. The cavity is driven by a laser at a red or blue mechanical subband, and a probe laser measures the reflection close to the cavity resonance. Under these conditions, we find that the cavity exhibits optomechanically induced reflection (OMIR) or absorption (OMIA) and investigate the optomechanical response in the limit of non-linear driving of the mechanics. Similar to linear mechanical drive, an overcoupled cavity the red-sideband drive may lead to both OMIA and OMIR depending on the strength of the drive, whereas the blue-sideband drive only leads to OMIR. The dynamics of the phase of the mechanical resonator leads to the difference between the shapes of the response of the cavity and the amplitude response of the driven Duffing oscillator, for example, at weak red-sideband drive the OMIA dip has no inflection point. We also verify that mechanical non-linearities beyond Duffing model have little effect on the size of the OMIA dip though they affect the width of the dip.
  • We study the dynamics of Josephson Parametric Amplifier (JPA) coupled to a mechanical oscillator, as realised with a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) with an embedded movable arm. We analyse this system in the regime when the frequency of the mechanical oscillator is comparable in magnitude with the plasma oscillation of the SQUID. When the nano-mechanical resonator is driven, it strongly affects the dynamics of the JPA. We show that this coupling can considerably modify the dynamics of JPA and induce its multistability rather than common bistability. This analysis is relevant if one considers a JPA for detection of mechanical motion.
  • Non-resonant circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation can exert torques on magnetization by the Inverse Faraday Effect (IFE). Here we discuss the enhancement of IFE by spin-orbit interactions (SOI). We illustrate the principle by studying a simple generic model system, i.e. the quasi-1D ring in the presence of linear/cubic Rashba and Dresselhaus interactions. We combine the classical IFE in electron plasmas that is known to cause persistent currents in the plane perpendicular to the direction of the propagation of light with the concept of current and spin-orbit-induced spin transfer torques. We calculate light-induced spin polarization that in ferromagnets might give rise to magnetization switching.
  • We investigate the behaviour of two non-linearly coupled flexural modes of a doubly-clamped suspended beam (nanomechanical resonator). One of the modes is externally driven. We demonstrate that classically, the behavior of the non-driven mode is reminiscent of that of a parametrically driven linear oscillator: It exhibits a threshold behavior, with the amplitude of this mode below the threshold being exactly zero. Quantum-mechanically, we were able to access the dynamics of this mode below the classical parametric threshold. We show that whereas the mean displacement of this mode is still zero, the mean squared displacement is finite and at the threshold corresponds to the occupation number of 1/2. This finite displacement of the non-driven mode can serve as an experimentally verifiable quantum signature of quantum motion.
  • The stochastic evolution of quantum systems during measurement is arguably the most enigmatic feature of quantum mechanics. Measuring a quantum system typically steers it towards a classical state, destroying any initial quantum superposition and any entanglement with other quantum systems. Remarkably, the measurement of a shared property between non-interacting quantum systems can generate entanglement starting from an uncorrelated state. Of special interest in quantum computing is the parity measurement, which projects a register of quantum bits (qubits) to a state with an even or odd total number of excitations. Crucially, a parity meter must discern the two parities with high fidelity while preserving coherence between same-parity states. Despite numerous proposals for atomic, semiconducting, and superconducting qubits, realizing a parity meter creating entanglement for both even and odd measurement results has remained an outstanding challenge. We realize a time-resolved, continuous parity measurement of two superconducting qubits using the cavity in a 3D circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) architecture and phase-sensitive parametric amplification. Using postselection, we produce entanglement by parity measurement reaching 77% concurrence. Incorporating the parity meter in a feedback-control loop, we transform the entanglement generation from probabilistic to fully deterministic, achieving 66% fidelity to a target Bell state on demand. These realizations of a parity meter and a feedback-enabled deterministic measurement protocol provide key ingredients for active quantum error correction in the solid state.
  • We study the transport of electrons through a single-mode quantum ring with electric field induced Rashba spin-orbit interaction that is subjected to an in-plane magnetic field and weakly coupled to electron reservoirs. Modelling a ring array by ensemble averaging over a Gaussian distribution of energy level positions, we predict slow conductance oscillations as a function of the Rashba interaction and electron density due to spin-orbit interaction-induced beating of the spacings between the levels crossed by the Fermi energy. Our results agree with experiments by Nitta c.s., thereby providing an interpretation that differs from the ordinary Aharonov-Casher effect in a single ring.
  • We study the dynamics of tripartite entanglement in a system of two strongly driven qubits individually coupled to a dissipative cavity. We aim at explanation of the previously noted entanglement revival between two qubits in this system. We show that the periods of entanglement loss correspond to the strong tripartite entanglement between the qubits and the cavity and the recovery has to do with an inverse process. We demonstrate that the overall process of qubit-qubit entanglement loss is due to the second order coupling to the external continuum which explains the exp[-g^2 t/2+g^2 k t^3/6+\cdot] for of the entanglement loss reported previously.
  • We theoretically consider a Josephson junction formed by a ferromagnetic spacer with a strong spin-orbit interaction or a magnetic spin valve, i.e., a bilayer with one static and one free layer. Electron spin transport facilitates a nonlinear dynamical coupling between the magnetic moment and charge current, which consists of normal and superfluid components. By phenomenologically adding reactive and dissipative interactions (guided by structural and Onsager symmetries), we construct magnetic torques and charge pumping, whose microscopic origins are also discussed. A stability analysis of our coupled nonlinear systems generates a rich phase diagram with fixed points, limit cycles, and quasiperiodic states. Our findings reduce to the known phase diagrams for current-biased nonmagnetic Josephson junctions, on the one hand, and spin-torque driven magnetic films, on the other, in the absence of coupling between the magnetic and superconducting order parameters.
  • Recently, a lasing effect has been observed in a superconducting nano-circuit where a Cooper pair box, acting as an artificial three-level atom, was coupled to a resonator. Motivated by this experiment, we analyze the quantum dynamics of a three-level atom coupled to a quantum-mechanical resonator in the presence of a driving on the cavity within the framework of the Lindblad master equation. As a result, we have access to the dynamics of the atomic level populations and the photon number in the cavity as well as to the output spectrum. The results of our quantum approach agree with the experimental findings. The presence of a fluctuator in the circuit is also analyzed. Finally, we compare our results with those obtained within a semiclassical approximation.
  • We have measured the backaction of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) position detector on an integrated 1 MHz flexural resonator. The frequency and quality factor of the micromechanical resonator can be tuned with bias current and applied magnetic flux. The backaction is caused by the Lorentz force due to the change in circulating current when the resonator displaces. The experimental features are reproduced by numerical calculations using the resistively and capacitively shunted junction (RCSJ) model.
  • We investigate electric current in a single-electron tunnelling device weakly coupled to an ac-driven underdamped harmonic nanomechanical oscillator. In the linear regime, the current can respond to the external frequency in a resonant as well as in an anti-resonant fashion. The main resonance is accompanied by an additional resonance at a half of the external frequency.
  • We study the dynamics and decoherence of a system of two strongly driven qubits in a dissipative cavity. The two qubits have no direct interaction and are individually off-resonantly coupled to a single mode of quantized radiation. We derive analytical solutions to the Lindblad-type master equation and study the evolution of the entanglement of this system. We show that with non-zero detuning between the quantum and classical fields, the initial decay of the entanglement is followed by its revival periodic in time. We show that different Bell states follow evolutions with different rates.
  • We investigate the conductivity of graphene sheet deformed over a gate. The effect of the deformation on the conductivity is twofold: The lattice distortion can be represented as pseudovector potential in the Dirac equation formalism, whereas the gate causes inhomogeneous density redistribution. We use the elasticity theory to find the profile of the graphene sheet and then evaluate the conductivity by means of the transfer matrix approach. We find that the two effects provide functionally different contributions to the conductivity. For small deformations and not too high residual stress the correction due to the charge redistribution dominates and leads to the enhancement of the conductivity. For stronger deformations, the effect of the lattice distortion becomes more important and eventually leads to the suppression of the conductivity. We consider homogeneous as well as local deformation. We also suggest that the effect of the charge redistribution can be best measured in a setup containing two gates, one fixing the overall charge density and another one deforming graphene locally.
  • We study electronic transport in graphene nanoribbons with rough edges. We first consider a model of weak disorder that corresponds to an armchair ribbon whose width randomly changes by a single unit cell size. We find that in this case, the low-temperature conductivity is governed by an effective one-dimensional hopping between segments of distinct band structure. We then provide numerical evidence and qualitative arguments that similar behavior also occurs in the limit of strong uncorrelated boundary disorder.
  • We investigate strong mechanical feedback for the single-electron tunneling device coupled to an underdamped harmonic oscillator in the high-frequency case, when the mechanical energy of the oscillator exceeds the tunnel rate, and for weak coupling. In the strong feedback regime, the mechanical oscillations oscillated by the telegraph signal from the SET in their turn modify the electric current. In contrast to the earlier results for the low frequencies, the current noise in not enhanced above the Poisson value.
  • We study the Josephson current through a ballistic normal metal layer of thickness $D$ on which two superconducting electrodes are deposited within a distance $L$ of each other. In the presence of an ({\it in-layer}) magnetic field we find that the oscillations of the critical current $I_c(\Phi)$ with the magnetic flux $\Phi$ are significantly different from an ordinary magnetic interference pattern. Depending on the ratio $L/D$ and temperature, $I_c(\Phi)$-oscillations can have a period smaller than flux quantum $\Phi_0$, nonzero minima and damping rate much smaller than $1/\Phi$. Similar anomalous magnetic interference pattern was recently observed experimentally.
  • We analyze theoretically the electronic properties of Aharonov-Bohm rings made of graphene. We show that the combined effect of the ring confinement and applied magnetic flux offers a controllable way to lift the orbital degeneracy originating from the two valleys, even in the absence of intervalley scattering. The phenomenon has observable consequences on the persistent current circulating around the closed graphene ring, as well as on the ring conductance. We explicitly confirm this prediction analytically for a circular ring with a smooth boundary modelled by a space-dependent mass term in the Dirac equation. This model describes rings with zero or weak intervalley scattering so that the valley isospin is a good quantum number. The tunable breaking of the valley degeneracy by the flux allows for the controlled manipulation of valley isospins. We compare our analytical model to another type of ring with strong intervalley scattering. For the latter case, we study a ring of hexagonal form with lattice-terminated zigzag edges numerically. We find for the hexagonal ring that the orbital degeneracy can still be controlled via the flux, similar to the ring with the mass confinement.
  • We study a new type of one-dimensional chiral states that can be created in bilayer graphene (BLG) by electrostatic lateral confinement. These states appear on the domain walls separating insulating regions experiencing the opposite gating polarity. While the states are similar to conventional solitonic zero-modes, their properties are defined by the unusual chiral BLG quasiparticles, from which they derive. The number of zero-mode branches is fixed by the topological vacuum charge of the insulating BLG state. We discuss how these chiral states can manifest experimentally, and emphasize their relevance for valleytronics.
  • Conductance of zigzag interfaces between graphene sheet and normal metal is investigated in the tight-binding approximation. Boundary conditions, valid for a variety of scattering problems, are constructed and applied to the normal metal -- graphene -- normal metal (NGN) junctions. At the Dirac point, the conductance is determined solely by the evanescent modes and is inversely proportional to the length of the junction. It is also independent on the interface resistance. Away from the Dirac point, the propagating modes' contribution dominates. We also observe that even in the junctions with high interface resistance, for certain modes, ideal transmission is possible via Fabry-Perot like resonances.