• Let $G$ be a graph and let $I = I(G)$ be its edge ideal. When $G$ is unicyclic, we give a decomposition of symbolic powers of $I$ in terms of its ordinary powers. This allows us to explicitly compute the Waldschmidt constant, the resurgence number, and the symbolic defect for $I$. When $G$ is an odd cycle, we explicitly compute the regularity of $I^{(s)}$ for all $s \in \mathbb{N}$. In doing so, we also give a natural lower bound for the regularity function $\text{reg } I^{(s)}$, for $s \in \mathbb{N}$, for an arbitrary graph $G$.
  • The experimental test of Bell's inequality is mainly focused on Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) form, which provides a quantitative bound, while little attention has been pained on the violation of Wigner inequality (WI). Based on the spin coherent state quantum probability statistics we in the present paper extend the WI and its violation to arbitrary two-spin entangled states with antiparallel and parallel spin-polarizations. The local part of density operator gives rise to the WI while the violation is a direct result of non-local interference between two components of the entangled states. The Wigner measuring outcome correlation denoted by $W$ is always less than or at most equal to zero for the local realist model ($% W_{lc_{{}}}\leq 0$) regardless of the specific initial state. On the other hand the violation of\ WI is characterized by any positive value of $W$, which possesses a maximum violation bound $W_{\max }$ $=1/2$. We conclude that the WI is equally convenient for the experimental test of violation by the quantum entanglement.
  • The future of main memory appears to lie in the direction of new technologies that provide strong capacity-to-performance ratios, but have write operations that are much more expensive than reads in terms of latency, bandwidth, and energy. Motivated by this trend, we propose sequential and parallel algorithms to solve graph connectivity problems using significantly fewer writes than conventional algorithms. Our primary algorithmic tool is the construction of an $o(n)$-sized "implicit decomposition" of a bounded-degree graph $G$ on $n$ nodes, which combined with read-only access to $G$ enables fast answers to connectivity and biconnectivity queries on $G$. The construction breaks the linear-write "barrier", resulting in costs that are asymptotically lower than conventional algorithms while adding only a modest cost to querying time. For general non-sparse graphs on $m$ edges, we also provide the first $o(m)$ writes and $O(m)$ operations parallel algorithms for connectivity and biconnectivity. These algorithms provide insight into how applications can efficiently process computations on large graphs in systems with read-write asymmetry.
  • In this paper we describe an algorithm that embeds a graph metric $(V,d_G)$ on an undirected weighted graph $G=(V,E)$ into a distribution of tree metrics $(T,D_T)$ such that for every pair $u,v\in V$, $d_G(u,v)\leq d_T(u,v)$ and ${\bf{E}}_{T}[d_T(u,v)]\leq O(\log n)\cdot d_G(u,v)$. Such embeddings have proved highly useful in designing fast approximation algorithms, as many hard problems on graphs are easy to solve on tree instances. For a graph with $n$ vertices and $m$ edges, our algorithm runs in $O(m\log n)$ time with high probability, which improves the previous upper bound of $O(m\log^3 n)$ shown by Mendel et al.\,in 2009. The key component of our algorithm is a new approximate single-source shortest-path algorithm, which implements the priority queue with a new data structure, the "bucket-tree structure". The algorithm has three properties: it only requires linear time in the number of edges in the input graph; the computed distances have a distance preserving property; and when computing the shortest-paths to the $k$-nearest vertices from the source, it only requires to visit these vertices and their edge lists. These properties are essential to guarantee the correctness and the stated time bound. Using this shortest-path algorithm, we show how to generate an intermediate structure, the approximate dominance sequences of the input graph, in $O(m \log n)$ time, and further propose a simple yet efficient algorithm to converted this sequence to a tree embedding in $O(n\log n)$ time, both with high probability. Combining the three subroutines gives the stated time bound of the algorithm. Then we show that this efficient construction can facilitate some applications. We proved that FRT trees (the generated tree embedding) are Ramsey partitions with asymptotically tight bound, so the construction of a series of distance oracles can be accelerated.
  • In several emerging technologies for computer memory (main memory), the cost of reading is significantly cheaper than the cost of writing. Such asymmetry in memory costs poses a fundamentally different model from the RAM for algorithm design. In this paper we study lower and upper bounds for various problems under such asymmetric read and write costs. We consider both the case in which all but $O(1)$ memory has asymmetric cost, and the case of a small cache of symmetric memory. We model both cases using the $(M,\omega)$-ARAM, in which there is a small (symmetric) memory of size $M$ and a large unbounded (asymmetric) memory, both random access, and where reading from the large memory has unit cost, but writing has cost $\omega\gg 1$. For FFT and sorting networks we show a lower bound cost of $\Omega(\omega n\log_{\omega M} n)$, which indicates that it is not possible to achieve asymptotic improvements with cheaper reads when $\omega$ is bounded by a polynomial in $M$. Also, there is an asymptotic gap (of $\min(\omega,\log n)/\log(\omega M)$) between the cost of sorting networks and comparison sorting in the model. This contrasts with the RAM, and most other models. We also show a lower bound for computations on an $n\times n$ diamond DAG of $\Omega(\omega n^2/M)$ cost, which indicates no asymptotic improvement is achievable with fast reads. However, we show that for the edit distance problem (and related problems), which would seem to be a diamond DAG, there exists an algorithm with only $O(\omega n^2/(M\min(\omega^{1/3},M^{1/2})))$ cost. To achieve this we make use of a "path sketch" technique that is forbidden in a strict DAG computation. Finally, we show several interesting upper bounds for shortest path problems, minimum spanning trees, and other problems. A common theme in many of the upper bounds is to have redundant computation to tradeoff between reads and writes.
  • In this paper, we proposed a new approximate heuristic search algorithm: Cascading A*, which is a two-phrase algorithm combining A* and IDA* by a new concept "envelope ball". The new algorithm CA* is efficient, able to generate approximate solution and any-time solution, and parallel friendly.
  • The single-source shortest path problem (SSSP) with nonnegative edge weights is a notoriously difficult problem to solve efficiently in parallel---it is one of the graph problems said to suffer from the transitive-closure bottleneck. In practice, the $\Delta$-stepping algorithm of Meyer and Sanders (J. Algorithms, 2003) often works efficiently but has no known theoretical bounds on general graphs. The algorithm takes a sequence of steps, each increasing the radius by a user-specified value $\Delta$. Each step settles the vertices in its annulus but can take $\Theta(n)$ substeps, each requiring $\Theta(m)$ work ($n$ vertices and $m$ edges). In this paper, we describe Radius-Stepping, an algorithm with the best-known tradeoff between work and depth bounds for SSSP with nearly-linear ($\otilde(m)$) work. The algorithm is a $\Delta$-stepping-like algorithm but uses a variable instead of fixed-size increase in radii, allowing us to prove a bound on the number of steps. In particular, by using what we define as a vertex $k$-radius, each step takes at most $k+2$ substeps. Furthermore, we define a $(k, \rho)$-graph property and show that if an undirected graph has this property, then the number of steps can be bounded by $O(\frac{n}{\rho} \log \rho L)$, for a total of $O(\frac{kn}{\rho} \log \rho L)$ substeps, each parallel. We describe how to preprocess a graph to have this property. Altogether, Radius-Stepping takes $O((m+n\log n)\log \frac{n}{\rho})$ work and $O(\frac{n}{\rho}\log n \log (\rho{}L))$ depth per source after preprocessing. The preprocessing step can be done in $O(m\log n + n\rho^2)$ work and $O(\rho^2)$ depth or in $O(m\log n + n\rho^2\log n)$ work and $O(\rho\log \rho)$ depth, and adds no more than $O(n\rho)$ edges.
  • Emerging memory technologies have a significant gap between the cost, both in time and in energy, of writing to memory versus reading from memory. In this paper we present models and algorithms that account for this difference, with a focus on write-efficient sorting algorithms. First, we consider the PRAM model with asymmetric write cost, and show that sorting can be performed in $O\left(n\right)$ writes, $O\left(n \log n\right)$ reads, and logarithmic depth (parallel time). Next, we consider a variant of the External Memory (EM) model that charges $\omega > 1$ for writing a block of size $B$ to the secondary memory, and present variants of three EM sorting algorithms (multi-way mergesort, sample sort, and heapsort using buffer trees) that asymptotically reduce the number of writes over the original algorithms, and perform roughly $\omega$ block reads for every block write. Finally, we define a variant of the Ideal-Cache model with asymmetric write costs, and present write-efficient, cache-oblivious parallel algorithms for sorting, FFTs, and matrix multiplication. Adapting prior bounds for work-stealing and parallel-depth-first schedulers to the asymmetric setting, these yield parallel cache complexity bounds for machines with private caches or with a shared cache, respectively.
  • In this paper, we study the problem of moving $n$ sensors on a line to form a barrier coverage of a specified segment of the line such that the maximum moving distance of the sensors is minimized. Previously, it was an open question whether this problem on sensors with arbitrary sensing ranges is solvable in polynomial time. We settle this open question positively by giving an $O(n^2 \log n)$ time algorithm. For the special case when all sensors have the same-size sensing range, the previously best solution takes $O(n^2)$ time. We present an $O(n \log n)$ time algorithm for this case; further, if all sensors are initially located on the coverage segment, our algorithm takes $O(n)$ time. Also, we extend our techniques to the cycle version of the problem where the barrier coverage is for a simple cycle and the sensors are allowed to move only along the cycle. For sensors with the same-size sensing range, we solve the cycle version in $O(n)$ time, improving the previously best $O(n^2)$ time solution.
  • The Peaceman-Rachford splitting method is very efficient for minimizing sum of two functions each depends on its variable, and the constraint is a linear equality. However, its convergence was not guaranteed without extra requirements. Very recently, He et al. (SIAM J. Optim. 24: 1011 - 1040, 2014) proved the convergence of a strictly contractive Peaceman-Rachford splitting method by employing a suitable underdetermined relaxation factor. In this paper, we further extend the so-called strictly contractive Peaceman-Rachford splitting method by using two different relaxation factors, and to make the method more flexible, we introduce semi-proximal terms to the subproblems. We characterize the relation of these two factors, and show that one factor is always underdetermined while the other one is allowed to be larger than 1. Such a flexible conditions makes it possible to cover the Glowinski's ADMM whith larger stepsize. We show that the proposed modified strictly contractive Peaceman-Rachford splitting method is convergent and also prove $O(1/t)$ convergence rate in ergodic and nonergodic sense, respectively. The numerical tests on an extensive collection of problems demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method.
  • We study quantum chaos in a non-KAM system, i.e. a kicked particle in a one-dimensional infinite square potential well. Within the perturbative regime the classical phase space displays stochastic web structures, and the diffusion coefficient D in the regime increases with the perturbative strength K giving a scaling $D \propto K^{2.5}$, and in the large K regime D goes as K^2. Quantum mechanically, we observe that the level spacing statistics of the quasi eigenenergies changes from Poisson to Wigner distribution as the kick strength increases. The quasi eigenstates show power-law localization in the small K region, which become extended one at large K. Possible experimental realization of this model is also discussed.