• We show that stability of planetary systems is intimately connected with their internal order. An arbitrary initial distribution of planets is susceptible to catastrophic events in which planets either collide or are ejected from the planetary system. These instabilities are a fundamental consequence of chaotic dynamics and of Arnold diffusion characteristic of many body gravitational interactions. To ensure stability over astronomical time scale of a {\it realistic} planetary system -- in which planets have masses comparable to those of planets in the solar system -- the motion must be quasi-periodic. A dynamical mechanism is proposed which naturally evolves a planetary system to a quasi-periodic state from an arbitrary initial condition. A planetary self-organization predicted by the theory is similar to the one found in our solar system. %
  • We present a theory that is able to account quantitatively for the surface and interfacial tensions of different electrolyte solutions. It is found that near the interface, ions can be separated into two classes: the kosmotropes and the chaotropes. While the kosmotropes remain hydrated near the interface and are repelled from it, the chaotropes loose their hydration sheath and become adsorbed to the surface. The anionic adsorption is strongly correlated with the Jones-Dole viscosity B-coefficient. Both hydration and polarizability must be taken into account to obtain a quantitative agreement with the experiments. To calculate the excess interfacial tension of the oil-electrolyte interface, the dispersion interactions must also be included. The theory can also be used to calculate the surface and the interfacial tensions of acid solutions, predicting a strong surface adsorption of hydronium ion.
  • We argue that the kosmotropes remain strongly hydrated in the vicinity of a hydrophobic surface, while the chaotropes lose their hydration shell and can become adsorbed to the interface. The mechanism of adsorption is still a subject of debate. We argue that there are two driving forces for anionic adsorption: the hydrophobic cavitational energy and the interfacial electrostatic surface potential of water. While the cavitational contribution to ionic adsorption is now well accepted, the role of the electrostatic surface potential is much less clear. The difficulty is that even the sign of this potential is a subject of debate, with the ab initio and the classical force field simulations predicting electrostatic surface potentials of opposite sign. In this paper, we will argue that the strong anionic adsorption found in the polarizable force field simulations is the result of the artificial electrostatic surface potential present in the classical water models. We will show that if the adsorption of anions were as large as predicted by the polarizable force field simulations, the excess surface tension of the NaI solution would be strongly negative, contrary to the experimental measurements. While the large polarizability of heavy halides is a fundamental property and must be included in realistic modeling of the electrolyte solutions, we argue that the point charge water models, studied so far, are incompatible with the polarizable ionic force fields when the translational symmetry is broken. The goal for the future should be the development of water models with very low electrostatic surface potential. We believe that such water models will be compatible with the polarizable force fields, which can then be used to study the interaction of ions with hydrophobic surfaces and proteins.
  • We study, using Monte Carlo simulations, the interaction between charged colloidal particles confined to the air-water interface. The dependence of force on ionic strength and counterion valence is explored. For 1:1 electrolyte, we find that the electrostatic interaction at the interface is very close to the one observed in the bulk. On the other hand, for salts with multivalent counterions, an interface produces an enhanced attraction between like charged colloids. Finally, we explore the effect of induced surface charge at the air-water interface on the interaction between colloidal particles.
  • We present theory and simulations which allow us to quantitatively calculate the amount of surface adsorption excess of charged nanoparticles onto a charged surface. The theory is very accurate for weakly charged nanoparticles and can be used at physiological concentrations of salt. We have also developed an efficient simulation algorithm which can be used for dilute suspensions of nanoparticles of any charge, even at very large salt concentrations. With the help of the new simulation method, we are able to efficiently calculate the adsorption isotherms of highly charged nanoparticles in suspensions containing multivalent ions, for which there are no accurate theoretical methods available.
  • We present a new approach to efficiently simulate electrolytes confined between infinite charged walls using a 3d Ewald summation method. The optimal performance is achieved by separating the electrostatic potential produced by the charged walls from the electrostatic potential of electrolyte. The electric field produced by 3d periodic images of the plates is constant, with the field produced by the transverse images of the charged plates canceling out. We show that under suitable renormalization, the non-neutral electrolyte confined between charged plates can be simulated using 3d Ewald summation with a correction that accounts for the conditional convergence of the resulting lattice sum. The new algorithm is at least an order of magnitude more rapid than the usual simulation methods for the slab geometry and can be further sped up by adopting Particle-Particle Particle-Mesh (P 3 M ) approach.
  • We explore, using the recently developed efficient Monte Carlo simulation method, the interaction of an anionic polyelectrolyte solution with a like-charged dielectric surface. In addition to polyions, the solution also contains salt with either monovalent, divalent, or trivalent counterions. In agreement with recent experimental observations, we find that multivalent counterions can lead to strong adsorption of polyions onto the surface. On the other hand, addition of a 1:1 electrolyte diminishes the adsorption induced by the multivalent counterions. Dielectric discontinuity at the interface is found to play only a marginal role in polyion adsorption.
  • In the present work we investigate a gas-liquid transition in a two-component Gaussian core model, where particles of the same species repel and those of different species attract. Unlike a similar transition in a one-component system with particles having attractive interactions at long separations, and repulsive interactions at short separations, a transition in the two-component system is not driven solely by interactions, but by a specific feature of the interactions, the correlations. This leads to extremely low critical temperature, as correlations are dominant in the strong-coupling limit. By carrying out various approximations based on standard liquid-state methods, we show that a gas-liquid transition of the two-component system posses a challenging theoretical problem.
  • On a fine grained scale the Gibbs entropy of an isolated system remains constant throughout its dynamical evolution. This is a consequence of Liouville's theorem for Hamiltonian systems and appears to contradict the second law of thermodynamics. In reality, however, there is no problem since the thermodynamic entropy should be associated with the Boltzmann entropy, which for non-equilibrium systems is different from Gibbs entropy. The Boltzmann entropy accounts for the microstates which are not accessible from a given initial condition, but are compatible with a given macrostate. In a sense the Boltzmann entropy is a coarse grained version of the Gibbs entropy and will not decrease during the dynamical evolution of a macroscopic system. In this paper we will explore the entropy production for systems with long range interactions. Unlike for short range systems, in the thermodynamic limit, the probability density function for these systems decouples into a product of one particle distribution functions and the coarse grained entropy can be calculated explicitly. We find that the characteristic time for the entropy production scales with the number of particles as $N^\alpha$, with $\alpha > 0$, so that in the thermodynamic limit entropy production takes an infinite amount of time.
  • We study, using Density Functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations, aqueous electrolyte solutions between charged infinite planar surfaces, in a contact with a bulk salt reservoir. In agreement with recent experimental observations [Z. Luo et al., Nat. Comm. 6, 6358 (2015)], we find that the confined electrolyte lacks local charge neutrality. We show that a Density Functional Theory (DFT) based on a bulk- HNC expansion properly accounts for strong electrostatic correlations and allows us to accurately calculate the ionic density profiles between the charged surfaces, even for electrolytes containing trivalent counterions. The DFT allows us to explore the degree of local charge neutrality violation, as a function of plate separation and bulk electrolyte concentration, and to accurately calculate the interaction force between the charged surfaces.
  • We study a generalization of the XY model with an additional nematic-like term through extensive numerical simulations and finite-size techniques, both in two and three dimensions. While the original model favors local alignment, the extra term induces angles of $2\pi/q$ between neighboring spins. We focus here on the $q=8$ case (while presenting new results for other values of $q$ as well) whose phase diagram is much richer than the well known $q=2$ case. In particular, the model presents not only continuous, standard transitions between Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phases as in $q=2$, but also infinite order transitions involving intermediate, competition driven phases absent for $q=2$ and 3. Besides presenting multiple transitions, our results show that having vortices decoupling at a transition is not a suficient condition for it to be of BKT type.
  • It is well-known that the swelling behavior of ionic nanogels depends on their cross-link density, however it is unclear how different topologies should affect the response of the polyelectrolyte network. Here we perform Monte Carlo simulations to obtain the equilibrium properties of ionic nanogels as a function of salt concentration $C_s$ and the fraction $f$ of ionizable groups in a polyelectrolyte network formed by cross-links of functionality $z$. Our results indicate that the network with cross-links of low connectivity result in nanogel particles with higher swelling ratios. We also confirm a de-swelling effect of salt on nanogel particles.
  • We present a simulation method to study electrolyte solutions in a dielectric slab geometry using a modified 3D Ewald summation. The method is fast and easy to implement, allowing us to rapidly resum an infinite series of image charges. In the weak coupling limit, we also develop a mean-field theory which allows us to predict the ionic distribution between the dielectric charged plates. The agreement between both approaches, theoretical and simulational, is very good, validating both methods. Examples of ionic density profiles in the strong electrostatic coupling limit are also presented. Finally, we explore the confinement of charge asymmetric electrolytes between neutral surfaces.
  • We study, using Monte Carlo simulations, the interaction between infinite heterogeneously charged surfaces inside an electrolyte solution. The surfaces are overall neutral with quenched charged domains. An average over the quenched disorder is performed to obtain the net force. We find that the interaction between the surfaces is repulsive at short distances and is attractive for larger separations.
  • We explore ensemble inequivalence in long-range interacting systems by studying an XY model of classical spins with ferromagnetic and nematic coupling. We demonstrate the inequivalence by mapping the microcanonical phase diagram onto the canonical one, and also by doing the inverse mapping. We show that the equilibrium phase diagrams within the two ensembles strongly disagree within the regions of first-order transitions, exhibiting interesting features like temperature jumps. In particular, we discuss the coexistence and forbidden regions of different macroscopic states in both the phase diagrams.
  • The equilibrium properties of ionic microgels are investigated using a combination of the Poisson-Boltzmann and Flory theories. Swelling behavior, density profiles, and effective charges are all calculated in a self-consistent way. Special attention is given to the effects of salinity on these quantities. It is found that the equilibrium microgel size is strongly influenced by the amount of added salt. Increasing the salt concentration leads to a considerable reduction of the microgel volume, which therefore releases its internal material -- solvent molecules and dissociated ions -- into the solution. Finally, the question of charge renormalization of ionic microgels in the context of the cell model is briefly addressed.
  • We argue that contrary to recent suggestions, non-extensive statistical mechanics has no relevance for inhomogeneous systems of particles interacting by short-range potentials. We show that these systems are perfectly well described by the usual Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical mechanics.
  • Three dimensional self-gravitating systems do not evolve to thermodynamic equilibrium, but become trapped in nonequilibrium quasistationary states. In this Letter we present a theory which allows us to a priori predict the particle distribution in a final quasistationary state to which a self-gravitating system will evolve from an initial condition which is isotropic in particle velocities and satisfies a virial constraint 2K=-U, where K is the total kinetic energy and U is the potential energy of the system.
  • We study the density distribution of repulsive Yukawa particles confined by an external potential. In the weak coupling limit, we show that the mean-field theory is able to accurately account for the particle distribution. In the strong coupling limit, the correlations between the particles become important and the mean-field theory fails. For strongly correlated systems, we construct a density functional theory which provides an excellent description of the particle distribution, without any adjustable parameters.
  • We develop a simulation method which allows us to calculate the critical micelle concentrations for ionic surfactants in the presence of different salts. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data. The simulations are performed on a simple cubic lattice. The anionic interactions with the alkyl chains are taken into account based on the previously developed theory of the interfacial tensions of hydrophobic interfaces: the kosmotropic anions do not interact with the hydrocarbon tails of ionic surfactants, while chaotropic anions interact with the alkyl chains through a dispersion potential proportional to the anionic polarizability.
  • We study, using extensive Monte Carlos simulations, the behavior of cationic polyelectrolytes near hydrophobic surfaces in solutions containing Hofmeister salts. The Hofmeister anions are divided into kosmotropes and chaotropes. Near a hydrophobic surface, the chaotropes lose their solvation sheath and become partially adsorbed to the interface, while the kosmotropes remain strongly hydrated and are repelled from the interface. If the polyelectrolyte solution contains chaotropic anions, a significant adsorption of polyions to the surface is also observed. On the other hand, the kosmotropic anions have only a small influence on the polyion adsorption. These findings can have important implications for exploring the antibacterial properties of cationic polyelectrolytes.
  • We present extensive numerical simulations of a generalized XY model with nematic-like terms recently proposed by Poderoso {\it et al} [PRL 106(2011)067202]. Using finite size scaling and focusing on the $q=3$ case, we locate the transitions between the paramagnetic (P), the nematic-like (N) and the ferromagnetic (F) phases. The results are compared with the recently derived lower bounds for the P-N and P-F transitions. While the P-N transition is found to be very close to the lower bound, the P-F transition occurs significantly above the bound. Finally, the transition between the nematic-like and the ferromagnetic phases is found to belong to the 3-states Potts universality class.
  • Systems with long-range interactions, such as self-gravitating clusters and magnetically confined plasmas, do not relax to the usual Boltzmann-Gibbs thermodynamic equilibrium, but become trapped in quasi-stationary states (QSS) the life time of which diverges with the number of particles. The QSS are characterized by the lack of ergodicity which can result in a symmetry broken QSS starting from a spherically symmetric particle distribution. We will present a theory which allows us to quantitatively predict the instability threshold for spontaneous symmetry breaking for a class of d-dimensional self-gravitating systems.
  • We study a model of interacting vortices in a type II superconductor. In the weak coupling limit, we constructed a mean-field theory which allows us to accurately calculate the vortex density distribution inside a confining potential. In the strong coupling limit, the correlations between the particles become important and the mean-field theory fails. Contrary to recent suggestions, this does not imply failure of the Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical mechanics, as we clearly demonstrate by comparing the results of Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations.
  • Systems with long-range (LR) forces, for which the interaction potential decays with the interparticle distance with an exponent smaller than the dimensionality of the embedding space, remain an outstanding challenge to statistical physics. The internal energy of such systems lacks extensivity and additivity. Although the extensivity can be restored by scaling the interaction potential with the number of particles, the non-additivity still remains. Lack of additivity leads to inequivalence of statistical ensembles. Before relaxing to thermodynamic equilibrium, isolated systems with LR forces become trapped in out-of-equilibrium quasi-stationary state (qSS), the lifetime of which diverges with the number of particles. Therefore, in thermodynamic limit LR systems will not relax to equilibrium. The qSSs are attained through the process of collisionless relaxation. Density oscillations lead to particle-wave interactions and excitation of parametric resonances. The resonant particles escape from the main cluster to form a tenuous halo. Simultaneously, this cools down the core of the distribution and dampens out the oscillations. When all the oscillations die out the ergodicity is broken and a qSS is born. In this report, we will review a theory which allows us to quantitatively predict the particle distribution in the qSS. The theory is applied to various LR interacting systems, ranging from plasmas to self-gravitating clusters and kinetic spin models.