• The calculation of the molecular column density from molecular spectral (rotational or ro-vibrational) transition measurements is one of the most basic quantities derived from molecular spectroscopy. Starting from first principles where we describe the basic physics behind the radiative and collisional excitation of molecules and the radiative transfer of their emission, we derive a general expression for the molecular column density. As the calculation of the molecular column density involves a knowledge of the molecular energy level degeneracies, rotational partition functions, dipole moment matrix elements, and line strengths, we include generalized derivations of these molecule-specific quantities. Given that approximations to the column density equation are often useful, we explore the optically thin, optically thick, and low-frequency limits to our derived general molecular column density relation. We also evaluate the limitations of the common assumption that the molecular excitation temperature is constant, and address the distinction between beam- and source-averaged column densities. We conclude our discussion of the molecular column density with worked examples for C$^{18}$O, C$^{17}$O, N$_2$H$^+$, NH$_3$, and H$_2$CO. Ancillary information on some subtleties involving line profile functions, conversion between integrated flux and brightness temperature, the calculation of the uncertainty associated with an integrated intensity measurement, the calculation of spectral line optical depth using hyperfine or isotopologue measurements, the calculation of the kinetic temperature from a symmetric molecule excitation temperature measurement, and relative hyperfine intensity calculations for NH$_3$ are presented in appendices. The intent of this document is to provide a reference for researchers studying astrophysical molecular spectroscopic measurements.
  • Compact substructure is expected to arise in a starless core as mass becomes concentrated in the central region likely to form a protostar. Additionally, multiple peaks may form if fragmentation occurs. We present ALMA Cycle 2 observations of 60 starless and protostellar cores in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud. We detect eight compact substructures which are >15 arcsec from the nearest Spitzer YSO. Only one of these has strong evidence for being truly starless after considering ancillary data, e.g., from Herschel and X-ray telescopes. An additional extended emission structure has tentative evidence for starlessness. The number of our detections is consistent with estimates from a combination of synthetic observations of numerical simulations and analytical arguments. This result suggests that a similar ALMA study in the Chamaeleon I cloud, which detected no compact substructure in starless cores, may be due to the peculiar evolutionary state of cores in that cloud.
  • Ammonia and its deuterated isotopologues probe physical conditions in dense molecular cloud cores. With the aim of testing the current understanding of the spin-state chemistry of these molecules, we observed spectral lines of NH3, NH2D, NHD2, ND3, and N2D+ towards a dense, starless core in Ophiuchus with the APEX, GBT, and IRAM 30-m telescopes. The observations were interpreted using a gas-grain chemistry model combined with radiative transfer calculations. The chemistry model distinguishes between the different nuclear spin states of light hydrogen molecules, ammonia, and their deuterated forms. High deuterium fractionation ratios with NH2D/NH3=0.4, NHD2/NH2D=0.2, and ND3/NHD2=0.06 were found in the core. The observed ortho/para ratios of NH2D and NHD2 are close to the corresponding nuclear spin statistical weights. The chemistry model can approximately reproduce the observed abundances, but predicts uniformly too low ortho/para-NH2D, and too large ortho/para-NHD2 ratios. The longevity of N2H+ and NH3 in dense gas, which is prerequisite to their strong deuteration, can be attributed to the chemical inertia of N2 on grain surfaces. The discrepancies between the chemistry model and the observations are likely to be caused by the fact that the model assumes complete scrambling in principal gas-phase deuteration reactions of ammonia, which means that all the nuclei are mixed in reactive collisions. If, instead, these reactions occur through proton hop/hydrogen abstraction processes, statistical spin ratios are to be expected. The present results suggest that while the deuteration of ammonia changes with physical conditions and time, the nuclear spin ratios of ammonia isotopologues do not probe the evolutionary stage of a cloud.
  • We present a 3 mm spectral line and continuum survey of L1451 in the Perseus Molecular Cloud. These observations are from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy), which also imaged Barnard 1, NGC 1333, Serpens Main and Serpens South. L1451 is the survey region with the lowest level of star formation activity---it contains no confirmed protostars. HCO+, HCN, and N2H+ (J=1-0) are all detected throughout the region, with HCO+ the most spatially widespread, and molecular emission seen toward 90% of the area above N(H_2) column densities of 1.9x10^21 cm^-2. HCO+ has the broadest velocity dispersion, near 0.3 km/s on average, compared to ~0.15 km/s for the other molecules, thus representing a range from supersonic to subsonic gas motions. Our non-binary dendrogram analysis reveals that the dense gas traced by each molecule has similar hierarchical structure, and that gas surrounding the candidate first hydrostatic core (FHSC), L1451-mm, and other previously detected single-dish continuum clumps have similar hierarchical structure; this suggests that different sub-regions of L1451 are fragmenting on the pathway to forming young stars. We determined the three-dimensional morphology of the largest detectable dense gas structures to be relatively ellipsoidal compared to other CLASSy regions, which appeared more flattened at largest scales. A virial analysis shows the most centrally condensed dust structures are likely unstable against collapse. Additionally, we identify a new spherical, centrally condensed N2H+ feature that could be a new FHSC candidate. The overall results suggest L1451 is a young region starting to form its generation of stars within turbulent, hierarchical structures.
  • We use the distance probability density function (DPDF) formalism of Ellsworth-Bowers et al. (2013, 2015) to derive physical properties for the collection of 1,710 Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) version 2 sources with well-constrained distance estimates. To account for Malmquist bias, we estimate that the present sample of BGPS sources is 90% complete above 400 $M_\odot$ and 50% complete above 70 $M_\odot$. The mass distributions for the entire sample and astrophysically motivated subsets are generally fitted well by a lognormal function, with approximately power-law distributions at high mass. Power-law behavior emerges more clearly when the sample population is narrowed in heliocentric distance (power-law index $\alpha = 2.0\pm0.1$ for sources nearer than 6.5 kpc and $\alpha = 1.9\pm0.1$ for objects between 2 kpc and 10 kpc). The high-mass power-law indices are generally $1.85 \leq \alpha \leq 2.05$ for various subsamples of sources, intermediate between that of giant molecular clouds and the stellar initial mass function. The fit to the entire sample yields a high-mass power-law $\hat{\alpha} = 1.94_{-0.10}^{+0.34}$. Physical properties of BGPS sources are consistent with large molecular cloud clumps or small molecular clouds, but the fractal nature of the dense interstellar medium makes difficult the mapping of observational categories to the dominant physical processes driving the observed structure. The face-on map of the Galactic disk's mass surface density based on BGPS dense molecular cloud structures reveals the high-mass star-forming regions W43, W49, and W51 as prominent mass concentrations in the first quadrant. Furthermore, we present a 0.25-kpc resolution map of the dense gas mass fraction across the Galactic disk that peaks around 5%.
  • We present 107 maps of continuum emission at 350 microns from Galactic molecular clumps. Observed sources were mainly selected from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) catalog, with 3 additional maps covering star forming regions in the outer Galaxy. The higher resolution of the SHARC-II images (8.5" beam) compared with the 1.1 mm images from BGPS (33" beam) allowed us to identify a large population of smaller substructures within the clumps. A catalog is presented for the 1386 sources extracted from the 350 micron maps. The color temperature distribution of clumps based on the two wavelengths has a median of 13.3 K and mean of 16.3 +- 0.4 K, assuming an opacity law index of 1.7. For the structures with good determination of color temperatures, the mean ratio of gas temperature, determined from NH3 observations, to dust color temperature is 0.88 and the median ratio is 0.76. About half the clumps have more than two substructures and 22 clumps have more than 10. The fraction of the mass in dense substructures seen at 350 microns compared to the mass of their parental clump is ~0.19, and the surface densities of these substructures are, on average, 2.2 times those seen in the clumps identified at 1.1 mm. For a well-characterized sample, 88 structures (31%) exceed a surface density of 0.2 g cm^(-2), and 18 (6%) exceed 1.0 g cm^(-2), thresholds for massive star formation suggested by theorists.
  • We present deep NH$_3$ observations of the L1495-B218 filaments in the Taurus molecular cloud covering over a 3 degree angular range using the K-band focal plane array on the 100m Green Bank Telescope. The L1495-B218 filaments form an interconnected, nearby, large complex extending over 8 pc. We observed NH$_3$ (1,1) and (2,2) with a spectral resolution of 0.038 km/s and a spatial resolution of 31$"$. Most of the ammonia peaks coincide with intensity peaks in dust continuum maps at 350 $\mu$m and 500 $\mu$m. We deduced physical properties by fitting a model to the observed spectra. We find gas kinetic temperatures of 8 $-$ 15 K, velocity dispersions of 0.05 $-$ 0.25 km/s, and NH$_3$ column densities of 5$\times$10$^{12}$ $-$ 1$\times$10$^{14}$ cm$^{-2}$. The CSAR algorithm, which is a hybrid of seeded-watershed and binary dendrogram algorithms, identifies a total of 55 NH$_3$ structures including 39 leaves and 16 branches. The masses of the NH$_3$ sources range from 0.05 M$_\odot$ to 9.5 M$_\odot$. The masses of NH$_3$ leaves are mostly smaller than their corresponding virial mass estimated from their internal and gravitational energies, which suggests these leaves are gravitationally unbound structures. 9 out of 39 NH$_3$ leaves are gravitationally bound and 7 out of 9 gravitationally bound NH$_3$ leaves are associated with star formation. We also found that 12 out of 30 gravitationally unbound leaves are pressure-confined. Our data suggest that a dense core may form as a pressure-confined structure, evolve to a gravitationally bound core, and undergo collapse to form a protostar.
  • We present an expanded distance catalog for 1,710 molecular cloud structures identified in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) version 2, representing a nearly threefold increase over the previous BGPS distance catalog. We additionally present a new method for incorporating extant data sets into our Bayesian distance probability density function (DPDF) methodology. To augment the dense-gas tracers (e.g., HCO+(3-2), NH3(1,1)) used to derive line-of-sight velocities for kinematic distances, we utilize the Galactic Ring Survey 13CO(1-0) data to morphologically extract velocities for BGPS sources. The outline of a BGPS source is used to select a region of the GRS 13CO data, along with a reference region to subtract enveloping diffuse emission, to produce a line profile of 13CO matched to the BGPS source. For objects with a HCO+(3-2) velocity, \approx 95% of the new 13CO(1-0) velocities agree with that of the dense gas. A new prior DPDF for kinematic distance ambiguity (KDA) resolution, based on a validated formalism for associating molecular cloud structures with known objects from the literature, is presented. We demonstrate this prior using catalogs of masers with trigonometric parallaxes and HII regions with robust KDA resolutions. The distance catalog presented here contains well-constrained distance estimates for 20% of BGPS V2 sources, with typical distance uncertainties \lesssim 0.5 kpc. Approximately 75% of the well-constrained sources lie within 6 kpc of the Sun, concentrated in the Scutum-Centarus arm. Galactocentric positions of objects additionally trace out portions of the Sagittarius, Perseus, and Outer arms in the first and second Galactic quadrants, and we also find evidence for significant regions of interarm dense gas.
  • We present observations of N2H+(1-0), HCO+(1-0), and HCN(1-0) toward the Serpens Main molecular cloud from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy). We mapped 150 square arcminutes of Serpens Main with an angular resolution of 7 arcsecs. The gas emission is concentrated in two subclusters (the NW and SE subclusters). The SE subcluster has more prominent filamentary structures and more complicated kinematics compared to the NW subcluster. The majority of gas in the two subclusters has subsonic to sonic velocity dispersions. We applied a dendrogram technique with N2H+(1-0) to study the gas structures; the SE subcluster has a higher degree of hierarchy than the NW subcluster. Combining the dendrogram and line fitting analyses reveals two distinct relations: a flat relation between nonthermal velocity dispersion and size, and a positive correlation between variation in velocity centroids and size. The two relations imply a characteristic depth of 0.15 pc for the cloud. Furthermore, we have identified six filaments in the SE subcluster. These filaments have lengths of 0.2 pc and widths of 0.03 pc, which is smaller than a characteristic width of 0.1 pc suggested by Herschel observations. The filaments can be classified into two types based on their properties. The first type, located in the northeast of the SE subcluster, has larger velocity gradients, smaller masses, and nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios. The other type, located in the southwest of the SE subcluster, has the opposite properties. Several YSOs are formed along two filaments which have supercritical mass per unit length ratios, while filaments with nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios are not associated with YSOs, suggesting that stars are formed on gravitationally unstable filaments.
  • We present observations of near-infrared 2.12 micro-meter molecular hydrogen outflows emerging from 1.1 mm dust continuum clumps in the North America and Pelican Nebula (NAP) complex selected from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS). Hundreds of individual shocks powered by over 50 outflows from young stars are identified, indicating that the dusty molecular clumps surrounding the NGC 7000 / IC 5070 / W80 HII region are among the most active sites of on-going star formation in the Solar vicinity. A spectacular X-shaped outflow, MHO 3400, emerges from a young star system embedded in a dense clump more than a parsec from the ionization front associated with the Pelican Nebula (IC 5070). Suspected to be a binary, the source drives a pair of outflows with orientations differing by 80 degrees. Each flow exhibits S-shaped symmetry and multiple shocks indicating a pulsed and precessing jet. The `Gulf of Mexico' located south of the North America Nebula (NGC 7000), contains a dense cluster of molecular hydrogen objects (MHOs), Herbig-Haro (HH) objects, and over 300 YSOs, indicating a recent burst of star formation. The largest outflow detected thus far in the North America and Pelican Nebula complex, the 1.6 parsec long MHO 3417 flow, emerges from a 500 Solar mass BGPS clump and may be powered by a forming massive star. Several prominent outflows such as MHO 3427 appear to be powered by highly embedded YSOs only visible at a wavelength > 70 micro-meters. An `activity index' formed by dividing the number of shocks by the mass of the cloud containing their source stars is used to estimate the relative evolutionary states of Bolocam clumps. Outflows can be used as indicators of the evolutionary state of clumps detected in mm and sub-mm dust continuum surveys.
  • The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) is a 1.1 mm continuum survey of dense clumps of dust throughout the Galaxy covering 170 square degrees. We present spectroscopic observations using the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope of the dense gas tracers, HCO+ and N2H+ 3-2, for all 6194 sources in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey v1.0.1 catalog between 7.5 <= l <= 194 degrees. This is the largest targeted spectroscopic survey of dense molecular gas in the Milky Way to date. We find unique velocities for 3126 (50.5%) of the BGPS v1.0.1 sources observed. Strong N2H+ 3-2 emission (T_{mb} > 0.5 K) without HCO+ 3-2 emission does not occur in this catalog. We characterize the properties of the dense molecular gas emission toward the entire sample. HCO+ is very sub-thermally populated and the 3-2 transitions are optically thick toward most BGPS clumps. The median observed line width is 3.3 km/s consistent with supersonic turbulence within BGPS clumps. We find strong correlations between dense molecular gas integrated intensities and 1.1 mm peak flux and the gas kinetic temperature derived from previously published NH3 observations. These intensity correlations are driven by the sensitivity of the 3-2 transitions to excitation conditions rather than by variations in molecular column density or abundance. We identify a subset of 113 sources with stronger N2H+ than HCO+ integrated intensity, but we find no correlations between the N2H+ / HCO+ ratio and 1.1 mm continuum flux density, gas kinetic temperature, or line width. Self-absorbed profiles are rare (1.3%).
  • We present a new distance estimation method for dust-continuum-identified molecular cloud clumps. Recent (sub-)millimeter Galactic plane surveys have cataloged tens of thousands of these objects, but detailed study of their physical properties requires robust distance determinations. We derive Bayesian distance probability density functions (DPDFs) for 770 objects from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey in the longitude range 7.5 < l < 65. The DPDF formalism is based on kinematic distances, and uses external data sets to place prior distance probabilities to resolve the kinematic distance ambiguity (KDA) for objects in the inner Galaxy. We present priors related to the mid-infrared absorption of dust in dense molecular regions and the Galactic distribution of molecular gas. By assuming a numerical model of Galactic mid-infrared emission and simple radiative transfer, we match the morphology of millimeter thermal dust emission with mid-infrared absorption to compute a prior DPDF for distance discrimination. Selecting objects first from (sub-)millimeter source catalogs avoids a bias towards the darkest infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) and extends the range of heliocentric distance and contrast range probed by mid-infrared extinction. We derive well-constrained KDA resolutions for 618 molecular cloud clumps, with approximately 15% placed at or beyond the tangent distance. Objects sufficiently dark to be cataloged as IRDCs are generally placed at the near kinematic distance. Distance comparisons with Galactic Ring Survey KDA resolutions yield a 92% agreement, and a Galactic face-on view reveals sections of the Sagittarius and Scutum-Centaurus Arms. This KDA-resolution method for large catalogs of sources through the combination of (sub-)millimeter and mid-infrared observations of molecular cloud clumps is generally applicable to other dust-continuum Galactic plane surveys.
  • In order to understand the collapse dynamics of observed low-mass starless cores, we revise the conventional stability condition of hydrostatic Bonnor-Ebert spheres to take internal motions into account. Because observed starless cores resemble Bonnor-Ebert density structures, the stability and dynamics of the starless cores are frequently analyzed by comparing to the conventional stability condition of a hydrostatic Bonnor-Ebert sphere. However, starless cores are not hydrostatic but have observed internal motions. In this study, we take gaseous spheres with a homologous internal velocity field and derive stability conditions of the spheres utilizing a virial analysis. We propose two limiting models of spontaneous gravitational collapse: the collapse of critical Bonnor-Ebert spheres and uniform density spheres. The collapse of these two limiting models are intended to provide the lower and the upper limits, respectively, of the infall speeds for a given density structure. The results of our study suggest that the stability condition sensitively depends on internal motions. A homologous inward motion with a transonic speed can reduce the critical size compared to the static Bonnor-Ebert sphere by more than a factor of two. As an application of the two limiting models of spontaneous gravitational collapse, we compare the density structures and infall speeds of the observed starless cores L63, L1544, L1689B, and L694-2 to the two limiting models. L1689B and L694-2 seem to have been perturbed to result in faster infall motions than for spontaneous gravitational collapse.
  • We present a systematic single-dish search for molecular outflows toward a sample of 9 candidate low-luminosity protostars and 30 candidate Very Low Luminosity Objects (VeLLOs; L_int < 0.1 L_sun). The sources are identified using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope catalogued by Dunham et al. toward nearby (D < 400 pc) star forming regions. Each object was observed in 12CO and 13CO J = 2-1 simultaneously using the sideband separating ALMA Band-6 prototype receiver on the Heinrich Hertz Telescope at 30 arcsecond resolution. Using 5-point grid maps we identify five new potential outflow candidates and make on-the-fly maps of the regions surrounding sources in the dense cores B59, L1148, L1228, and L1165. Of these new outflow candidates, only the map of B59 shows a candidate blue outflow lobe associated with a source in our survey. We also present larger and more sensitive maps of the previously detected L673-7 and the L1251-A IRS4 outflows and analyze their properties in comparison to other outflows from VeLLOs. The accretion luminosities derived from the outflow properties of the VeLLOs with detected CO outflows are higher than the observed internal luminosity of the protostars, indicating that these sources likely had higher accretion rates in the past. The known L1251-A IRS3 outflow is detected but not remapped. We do not detect clear, unconfused signatures of red and blue molecular wings toward the other 31 sources in the survey indicating that large-scale, distinct outflows are rare toward this sample of candidate protostars. Several potential outflows are confused with kinematic structure in the surrounding core and cloud. Interferometric imaging is needed to disentangle large-scale molecular cloud kinematics from these potentially weak protostellar outflows.
  • The millimeter-wave rotational transition line ($J_K = 1_0 - 0_0$) of deuterated methane CH$_3$D has tentatively been detected toward the low-mass Class 0 protostar IRAS 04368+2557 in L1527 with the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope. This is the first detection of CH$_3$D in interstellar clouds, if confirmed. The column density and fractional abundance of CH$_3$D are determined to be $(9.1\pm3.4) \times 10^{15}$ cm$^{-2}$ and $(3.0\pm1.1) \times 10^{-7}$, respectively, where we assume the rotational temperature of 25 K. The column density and fractional abundance of the gaseous CH$_4$ are estimated to be $(1.3-4.6) \times 10^{17}$ cm$^{-2}$ and $(4.3-15.2) \times 10^{-6}$, respectively, by adopting the molecular D/H ratios of 2--7% reported for various molecules in L1527. The fractional abundance of CH$_4$ is higher than or comparable to that found in high-mass star-forming cores by infrared observations. It is sufficiently high for triggering the efficient production of various carbon-chain molecules in a lukewarm region near the protostar, which supports the picture of the warm carbon-chain chemistry.
  • We present an analysis of the relation between the star formation rate (SFR) and mass of dense gas in Galactic clumps and nearby galaxies. Using the bolometric luminosity as a measure of SFR and the molecular line luminosity of HCO+ (3-2) as a measure of dense gas mass, we find that the relation between SFR and M_{dense} is approximately linear. This is similar to published results derived using HCN (1-0) as a dense gas tracer. HCO+ (3-2) and HCN (1-0) have similar conditions for excitation. Our work includes 16 Galactic clumps that are in both the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey and the Red MSX Survey, 27 water maser sources from the literature, and the aforementioned HCN (1-0) data. Our results agree qualitatively with predictions of recent theoretical models which state that the nature of the relation should depend on how the critical density of the tracer compares with the mean density of the gas.
  • We analyze the HCO+ 3-2 and H13CO+ 3-2 line profiles of 27 high-mass star-forming regions to identify asymmetries that are suggestive of mass inflow. Three quantitative measures of line asymmetry are used to indicate whether a line profile is blue, red or neither - the ratio of the temperature of the blue and red peaks, the line skew and the dimensionless parameter delta_v. We find nine HCO+ 3-2 line profiles with a significant blue asymmetry and four with significant red asymmetric profiles. Comparing our HCO+ 3-2 results to HCN 3-2 observations from Wu et al. (2003, 2010), we find that eight of the blue and three of red have profiles with the same asymmetry in HCN. The eight sources with blue asymmetries in both tracers are considered strong candidates for inflow. Quantitative measures of the asymmetry (e.g. delta_v) tend to be larger for HCN. This, combined with possible HCO+ abundance enhancements in outflows, suggests that HCN may be a better tracer of inflow. Understanding the behavior of common molecular tracers like HCO+ in clumps of different masses is important for properly analyzing the line profiles seen in a sample of sources representing a broad range of clump masses. Such studies will soon be possible with the large number of sources with possible self-absorption seen in spectroscopic follow-up observations of clumps identified in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey.
  • We present the results of observations of 1882 sources in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) at 1.1 mm with the 10m Heinrich Hertz Telescope simultaneously in HCO+ J=3-2 and N2H+ J=3-2. We detect 77% of these sources in HCO^+ and 51% in N2H+ at greater than 3$\sigma$. We find a strong correlation between the integrated intensity of both dense gas tracers and the 1.1 mm dust emission of BGPS sources. We determine kinematic distances for 529 sources (440 in the first quadrant breaking the distance ambiguity and 89 in the second quadrant) We derive the size, mass, and average density for this subset of clumps. The median size of BGPS clumps is 0.75 pc with a median mass of 330 M$_{\odot}$ (assuming T_{Dust}=20 K). The median HCO+ linewidth is 2.9 km s$^{-1}$ indicating that BGPS clumps are dominated by supersonic turbulence or unresolved kinematic motions. We find no evidence for a size-linewidth relationship for BGPS clumps. We analyze the effects of the assumed dust temperature on the derived clump properties with a Monte Carlo simulation and we find that changing the temperature distribution will change the median source properties (mass, volume-averaged number density, surface density) by factors of a few. The observed differential mass distribution has a power-law slope that is intermediate between that observed for diffuse CO clouds and the stellar IMF. BGPS clumps represent a wide range of objects (from dense cores to more diffuse clumps) and are typically characterized by larger sizes and lower densities than previously published surveys of high-mass star-forming regions. This collection of objects is a less-biased sample of star-forming regions in the Milky Way that likely span a wide range of evolutionary states.
  • We present here findings for C18O depletion in eight starless cores in Taurus: TMC-2, L1498, L1512, L1489, L1517B, L1521E, L1495A-S, and L1544. We compare observations of the C18O J=2-1 transition taken with the ALMA prototype receiver on the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope to results of radiative transfer modeling using RATRAN. We use temperature and density profiles calculated from dust continuum radiative transfer models to model the C18O emission. We present modeling of three cores, TMC-2, L1489, and L1495A-S, which have not been modeled before and compare our results for the five cores with published models. We find that all of the cores but one, L1521E, are substantially depleted. We also find that varying the temperature profiles of these model cores has a discernable effect, and varying the central density has an even larger effect. We find no trends with depletion radius or depletion fraction with the density or temperature of these cores, suggesting that the physical structure alone is insufficient to fully constrain evolutionary state. We are able to place tighter constraints on the radius at which C18O is depleted than the absolute fraction of depletion. As the timeline of chemical depletion depends sensitively on the fraction of depletion, this difficulty in constraining depletion fraction makes comparison with other timescales, such as the free-fall timescale, very difficult. Keywords: Stars:Formation -- ISM:abundances-- ISM:clouds -- Individual Objects: TMC-2, L1498, L1512, L1489, L1517B, L1521E, L1495A-S, L1544
  • We present new observations of the CB130 region, composed of three separate cores. Using the \textit{Spitzer Space Telescope} we detected a Class 0 and a Class II object in one of these, CB130-1. The observed photometric data from \textit{Spitzer} and ground-based telescopes are used to establish the physical parameters of the Class 0 object. SED fitting with a radiative transfer model shows that the luminosity of the Class 0 object is 0.14 $-$ 0.16 L$_{\odot}$, which is a low luminosity for a protostellar object. In order to constrain the chemical characteristics of the core having the low luminosity object, we compare our molecular line observations to models of lines including abundance variations. We tested both ad hoc step function abundance models and a series of self-consistent chemical evolution models. In the chemical evolution models, we consider a continuous accretion model and an episodic accretion model to explore how variable luminosity affects the chemistry. The step function abundance models can match observed lines reasonably well. The best fitting chemical evolution model requires episodic accretion and the formation of CO$_2$ ice from CO ice during the low luminosity periods. This process removes C from the gas phase, providing a much improved fit to the observed gas-phase molecular lines and the CO$_2$ ice absorption feature. Based on the chemical model result, the low luminosity of CB130-1 is explained better as a quiescent stage between episodic accretion bursts rather than being at the first hydrostatic core stage.
  • Infrared extinction maps and submillimeter dust continuum maps are powerful probes of the density structure in the envelope of star-forming cores. We make a direct comparison between infrared and submillimeter dust continuum observations of the low-mass Class 0 core, B335, to constrain the ratio of submillimeter to infrared opacity (\kaprat) and the submillimeter opacity power-law index ($\kappa \propto \lambda^{-\beta}$). Using the average value of theoretical dust opacity models at 2.2 \micron, we constrain the dust opacity at 850 and 450 \micron . Using new dust continuum models based upon the broken power-law density structure derived from interferometric observations of B335 and the infall model derived from molecular line observations of B335, we find that the opacity ratios are $\frac{\kappa_{850}}{\kappa_{2.2}} = (3.21 - 4.80)^{+0.44}_{-0.30} \times 10^{-4}$ and $\frac{\kappa_{450}}{\kappa_{2.2}} = (12.8 - 24.8)^{+2.4}_{-1.3} \times 10^{-4}$ with a submillimeter opacity power-law index of $\beta_{smm} = (2.18 - 2.58)^{+0.30}_{-0.30}$. The range of quoted values are determined from the uncertainty in the physical model for B335. For an average 2.2 \micron\ opacity of $3800 \pm 700$ cm$^2$g$^{-1}$, we find a dust opacity at 850 and 450 \micron\ of $\kappa_{850} = (1.18 - 1.77)^{+0.36}_{-0.24}$ and $\kappa_{450} = (4.72 - 9.13)^{+1.9}_{-0.98}$ cm$^2$g$^{-1}$ of dust. These opacities are from $(0.65 - 0.97) \kappa^{\rm{OH}5}_{850}$ of the widely used theoretical opacities of Ossenkopf and Henning for coagulated ice grains with thin mantles at 850\micron.
  • We present observations of six Class 0 protostars at 3.3 mm (90 GHz) using the 64-pixel MUSTANG bolometer camera on the 100-m Green Bank Telescope. The 3.3 mm photometry is analyzed along with shorter wavelength observations to derive spectral indices (S_nu ~ nu^alpha) of the measured emission. We utilize previously published dust continuum radiative transfer models to estimate the characteristic dust temperature within the central beam of our observations. We present constraints on the millimeter dust opacity index, beta, between 0.862 mm, 1.25 mm, and 3.3 mm. Beta_mm typically ranges from 1.0 to 2.4 for Class 0 sources. The relative contributions from disk emission and envelope emission are estimated at 3.3 mm. L483 is found to have negligible disk emission at 3.3 mm while L1527 is dominated by disk emission within the central beam. The beta_mm^disk <= 0.8 - 1.4 for L1527 indicates that grain growth is likely occurring in the disk. The photometry presented in this paper may be combined with future interferometric observations of Class 0 envelopes and disks.
  • The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) data for a six square degree region of the Galactic plane containing the Galactic center is analyzed and compared to infrared and radio continuum data. The BGPS 1.1 mm emission consists of clumps interconnected by a network of fainter filaments surrounding cavities, a few of which are filled with diffuse near-IR emission indicating the presence of warm dust or with radio continuum characteristic of HII regions or supernova remnants. New 350 {\mu}m images of the environments of the two brightest regions, Sgr A and B, are presented. Sgr B2 is the brightest mm-emitting clump in the Central Molecular Zone and may be forming the closest analog to a super star cluster in the Galaxy. The Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) contains the highest concentration of mm and sub-mm emitting dense clumps in the Galaxy. Most 1.1 mm features at positive longitudes are seen in silhouette against the 3.6 to 24 {\mu}m background observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope. However, only a few clumps at negative longitudes are seen in absorption, confirming the hypothesis that positive longitude clumps in the CMZ tend to be on the near-side of the Galactic center, consistent with the suspected orientation of the central bar in our Galaxy. Some 1.1 mm cloud surfaces are seen in emission at 8 {\mu}m, presumably due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A ~0.2\degree (~30 pc) diameter cavity and infrared bubble between l \approx 0.0\degree and 0.2\degree surrounds the Arches and Quintuplet clusters and Sgr A. The bubble contains several clumpy dust filaments that point toward Sgr A\ast; its potential role in their formation is explored. [abstract truncated]
  • We examine the physical properties and evolutionary stages of a sample of 17 clumps within 8 Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) by combining existing infrared, millimeter, and radio data with new Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) 1.1 mm data, VLA radio continuum data, and HHT dense gas (HCO+ and N2H+) spectroscopic data. We combine literature studies of star formation tracers and dust temperatures within IRDCs with our search for ultra-compact (UC) HII regions to discuss a possible evolutionary sequence for IRDC clumps. In addition, we perform an analysis of mass tracers in IRDCs and find that 8 micron extinction masses and 1.1 mm Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) masses are complementary mass tracers in IRDCs except for the most active clumps (notably those containing UCHII regions), for which both mass tracers suffer biases. We find that the measured virial masses in IRDC clumps are uniformly higher than the measured dust continuum masses on the scale of ~1 pc. We use 13CO, HCO+, and N2H+ to study the molecular gas properties of IRDCs and do not see any evidence of chemical differentiation between hot and cold clumps on the scale of ~1 pc. However, both HCO+ and N2H+ are brighter in active clumps, due to an increase in temperature and/or density. We report the identification of four UCHII regions embedded within IRDC clumps and find that UCHII regions are associated with bright (>1 Jy) 24 micron point sources, and that the brightest UCHII regions are associated with "diffuse red clumps" (an extended enhancement at 8 micron). The broad stages of the discussed evolutionary sequence (from a quiescent clump to an embedded HII region) are supported by literature dust temperature estimates; however, no sequential nature can be inferred between the individual star formation tracers.
  • We present the 1.1 millimeter Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) observations of the Gemini OB1 molecular cloud complex, and targeted ammonia observations of the BGPS sources. When paired with molecular spectroscopy of a dense gas tracer, millimeter observations yield physical properties such as masses, radii, mean densities, kinetic temperatures and line widths. We detect 34 distinct BGPS sources above 5-sigma=0.37 Jy/beam with corresponding 5-sigma detections in the ammonia (1,1) transition. Eight of the objects show water maser emission (20%). We find a mean millimeter source FWHM of 1.12 pc, and a mean kinetic temperature of 20 K for the sample of 34 BGPS sources. The observed ammonia line widths are dominated by non-thermal motions, typically found to be a few times the thermal sound speed expected for the derived kinetic temperature. We calculate the mass for each source from the millimeter flux assuming the sources are isothermal and find a mean isothermal mass within a 120" aperture of 230 +/- 180 solar masses. We find a total mass of 8,400 solar masses for all BGPS sources in the Gemini OB1 molecular cloud, representing 6.5% of the cloud mass. By comparing the millimeter isothermal mass to the virial mass within a radius equal to the mm source size calculated from the ammonia line widths, we find a mean virial parameter (M_vir/M_iso) of 1.0 +/- 0.9 for the sample. We find mean values for the distributions of column densities of 10^22 cm^-2 for H_2, and 3.0x10^14 cm^-2 for ammonia, giving a mean ammonia abundance of 3.0x10^-8 relative to H_2. We find volume-averaged densities on the order of 10^3-10^4 cm^-3. The sizes and densities suggest that in the Gem OB1 region the BGPS is detecting the clumps from which stellar clusters form, rather than smaller, higher density cores where single stars or small multiple systems form.