• In this paper, we present the design and the expected performance of the classical Lyot coronagraph for the high contrast imaging modes of the wide-field imager MICADO. MICADO is a near-IR camera for the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT, previously E-ELT), with wide-field, spectroscopic and coronagraphic capabilities. MICADO is one of the first-light instruments selected by the ESO. Optimized to work with a multi-conjugate adaptive optics corrections provided by the MOARY module, it will also come with a SCAO correction with a high-level, on-axis correction, making use of the M4 adaptive mirror of the telescope. After presenting the context of the high contrast imaging modes in MICADO, we describe the selection process for the focal plane masks and Lyot stop. We will also show results obtained in realistic conditions, taking into account AO residuals, atmospheric refraction, noise sources and simulating observations in angular differential imaging (ADI) mode. Based on SPHERE on-sky results, we will discuss the achievable gain in contrast and angular separation provided by MICADO over the current instruments on 10-m class telescopes, in particular for imaging young giant planets at very short separations around nearby stars as well as planets on wider orbits around more distant stars in young stellar associations.
  • With the aim of paving the road for future accurate astrometry with MICADO at the European-ELT, we performed an astrometric study using two different but complementary approaches to investigate two critical components that contribute to the total astrometric accuracy. First, we tested the predicted improvement in the astrometric measurements with the use of an atmospheric dispersion corrector (ADC) by simulating realistic images of a crowded Galactic globular cluster. We found that the positional measurement accuracy should be improved by up to ~2 mas with the ADC, making this component fundamental for high-precision astrometry. Second, we analysed observations of a globular cluster taken with the only currently available Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics assisted camera, GeMS/GSAOI at Gemini South. Making use of previously measured proper motions of stars in the field of view, we were able to model the distortions affecting the stellar positions. We found that they can be as large as ~200 mas, and that our best model corrects them to an accuracy of ~1 mas. We conclude that future astrometric studies with MICADO requires both an ADC and an accurate modelling of distortions to the field of view, either through an a-priori calibration or an a-posteriori correction.
  • Aims. We have investigated neutral gas in the central cavity of the circumnuclear disk (CND) at the Galactic Center, where the ionized minispiral lies, to describe the H2 distribution and properties in this ionized environment. Methods. This study was carried out through a spectro-imaging data cube of the central cavity obtained with SPIFFI on the VLT. The observed field of view is 36"x 29" , with a spectral resolution R = 1 300 in the near-infrared. These observations cover several H2 lines. To preserve the spatial resolution and avoid edge effects, we applied a new line-fitting method that consists of a regularized 3D fitting. We also applied a more classical 1D fitting to compare the relative strength of the H2 lines. Results. We present high spatial and spectral resolution maps of the intensity, velocity, and width of five H2 lines and an extinction map derived from H2. Molecular gas is detected everywhere in the field. In particular, in addition to the known CND features, we detected an emission from the northern arm cloud and from the minicavity. The excitation diagrams allow us to estimate the temperature, mass, and density of these features. Conclusions. We interpret the CND emission as coming from a hot, thermalized, thin layer at the surface of the clouds. The observed H2 corresponds only to a small fraction of the total H2 mass. The emission remains fairly strong in the whole central cavity, but it is not thermalized. A strong deviation from thermal equilibrium is detected near the minicavity. We suggest that this emission is caused by constantly forming H2 that is destroyed again before it reaches ortho/para equilibrium.
  • This White Paper presents the scientific motivations for a multi-object spectrograph (MOS) on the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). The MOS case draws on all fields of contemporary astronomy, from extra-solar planets, to the study of the halo of the Milky Way and its satellites, and from resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies out to observations of the earliest 'first-light' structures in the partially-reionised Universe. The material presented here results from thorough discussions within the community over the past four years, building on the past competitive studies to agree a common strategy toward realising a MOS capability on the E-ELT. The cases have been distilled to a set of common requirements which will be used to define the MOSAIC instrument, entailing two observational modes ('high multiplex' and 'high definition'). When combined with the unprecedented sensitivity of the E-ELT, MOSAIC will be the world's leading MOS facility. In analysing the requirements we also identify a high-multiplex MOS for the longer-term plans for the E-ELT, with an even greater multiplex (>1000 targets) to enable studies of large-scale structures in the high-redshift Universe. Following the green light for the construction of the E-ELT the MOS community, structured through the MOSAIC consortium, is eager to realise a MOS on the E-ELT as soon as possible. We argue that several of the most compelling cases for ELT science, in highly competitive areas of modern astronomy, demand such a capability. For example, MOS observations in the early stages of E-ELT operations will be essential for follow-up of sources identified by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). In particular, multi-object adaptive optics and accurate sky subtraction with fibres have both recently been demonstrated on sky, making fast-track development of MOSAIC feasible.
  • GRAVITY is a second generation instrument for the VLT Interferometer, designed to enhance the near-infrared astrometric and spectro-imaging capabilities of VLTI. Combining beams from four telescopes, GRAVITY will provide an astrometric precision of order 10 micro-arcseconds, imaging resolution of 4 milli-arcseconds, and low and medium resolution spectro-interferometry, pushing its performance far beyond current infrared interfero- metric capabilities. To maximise the performance of GRAVITY, adaptive optics correction will be implemented at each of the VLT Unit Telescopes to correct for the effects of atmospheric turbulence. To achieve this, the GRAVITY project includes a development programme for four new wavefront sensors (WFS) and NIR-optimized real time control system. These devices will enable closed-loop adaptive correction at the four Unit Telescopes in the range 1.4-2.4 {\mu}m. This is crucially important for an efficient adaptive optics implementation in regions where optically bright references sources are scarce, such as the Galactic Centre. We present here the design of the GRAVITY wavefront sensors and give an overview of the expected adaptive optics performance under typical observing conditions. Benefiting from newly developed SELEX/ESO SAPHIRA electron avalanche photodiode (eAPD) detectors providing fast readout with low noise in the near-infrared, the AO systems are expected to achieve residual wavefront errors of \leq400 nm at an operating frequency of 500 Hz.
  • The very large telescope (VLT) interferometer (VLTI) in its current operating state is equipped with high-order adaptive optics (MACAO) working in the visible spectrum. A low-order near-infrared wavefront sensor (IRIS) is available to measure non-common path tilt aberrations downstream the high-order deformable mirror. For the next generation of VLTI instrumentation, in particular for the designated GRAVITY instrument, we have examined various designs of a four channel high-order near-infrared wavefront sensor. Particular objectives of our study were the specification of the near-infrared detector in combination with a standard wavefront sensing system. In this paper we present the preliminary design of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor operating in the near-infrared wavelength range, which is capable of measuring the wavefronts of four telescopes simultaneously. We further present results of our design study, which aimed at providing a first instrumental concept for GRAVITY.
  • Adaptive optics (AO) allows one to derive the point spread function (PSF) simultaneously to the science image, which is a major advantage in post-processing tasks such as astrometry/photometry or deconvolution. Based on the algorithm of \citet{veran97}, PSF reconstruction has been developed for four different AO systems so far: PUEO, ALFA, Lick-AO and Altair. A similar effort is undertaken for NAOS/VLT in a collaboration between the group PHASE (Onera and Observatoire de Paris/LESIA) and ESO. In this paper, we first introduce two new algorithms that prevent the use of the so-called "$U\_{ij}$ functions" to: (1) avoid the storage of a large amount of data (for both new algorithms), (2) shorten the PSF reconstruction computation time (for one of the two) and (3) provide an estimation of the PSF variability (for the other one). We then identify and explain issues in the exploitation of real-time Shack-Hartmann (SH) data for PSF reconstruction, emphasising the large impact of thresholding in the accuracy of the phase residual estimation. Finally, we present the data provided by the NAOS real-time computer (RTC) to reconstruct PSF ({\em (1)} the data presently available, {\em (2)} two NAOS software modifications that would provide new data to increase the accuracy of the PSF reconstruction and {\em (3)} the tests of these modifications) and the PSF reconstruction algorithms we are developing for NAOS on that basis.
  • We have collected in 2004 adaptive optics corrected L' images of the Galactic Center region with NAOS-CONICA at VLT. A strong variability was observed as well as a correlation between the photocenter positions and fluxes of the L'-band counterpart of Sgr A*. It is interpreted as the combined emission of a point-like flaring source at the position of Sgr A*/IR itself and an extended dust structure, 75 mas south west of Sgr A*/IR, which we name Sgr A*-f. We examine the different possible mechanisms to explain this dual Sgr A* L' emission and conclude it is likely a flaring emission associated to energetic events in the close environment of the black hole plus a quiescent emission resulting from the collision of Sgr A*-f by a jet from Sgr A*.
  • Near-infrared observations of line emission from excited H2 and in the continuum are reported in the direction of the Orion molecular cloud OMC1, using the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope UT4, equipped with the NAOS adaptive optics system and the CONICA infrared array camera. Spatial resolution has been achieved at close to the diffraction limit of the telescope (0.08" - 0.12") and images show a wealth of morphological detail. Structure is not fractal but shows two preferred scale sizes of 2.4" (1100 AU) and 1.2" (540 AU), where the larger scale may be associated with star formation.
  • We present K, L and M diffraction-limited images of NGC 1068 obtained with NAOS+CONICA at VLT/YEPUN over a 3.5" field around the central engine. Hot dust (Tcol = 550-650 K) is found in three different regions : (a) in the true nucleus, seen as a slightly NS elongated, core of extremely hot dust, "resolved" in K and L with respective diameters of ~5 pc and 8.5 pc ; (b) along the NS direction, as a "spiral arm" and a southern tongue ; (c) as a set of parallel elongated nodules ("wave-like") bracketting the jet. Several structures observed on radio maps, mid-IR or HST UV-visible maps are seen, so that a precise registration can be done from UV to 6 cm. These results do support the current interpretion that source (a) corresponds to emission from dust near sublimation temperature delimiting the walls of the cavity in the central obscuring torus. Structure (b) is thought to be a mixture of hot dust and active star forming regions along a micro spiral structure that could trace the tidal mechanism bringing matter to the central engine. Structure c)which was not known, exhibits too high a temperature for "classical'' grains ; it is most probably the signature of transiently heated very small dust grains (VSG) : "nano-diamonds", which are resistant and can form in strong UV field or in shocks, are very attractive candidates. The "waves'' can be condensations triggered by jet induced shocks, as predicted by recent models. First estimates, based on a simple VSG model and on a detailed radiative transfer model, do agree with those interpretations, both qualitatively and quantitatively.