• Improving the precision of measurements is a significant scientific challenge. The challenge is twofold: first, overcoming noise that limits the precision given a fixed amount of a resource, N, and second, improving the scaling of precision over the standard quantum limit (SQL), 1/\sqrt{N}, and ultimately reaching a Heisenberg scaling (HS), 1/N. Here we present and experimentally implement a new scheme for precision measurements. Our scheme is based on a probe in a mixed state with a large uncertainty, combined with a post-selection of an additional pure system, such that the precision of the estimated coupling strength between the probe and the system is enhanced. We performed a measurement of a single photon's Kerr non-linearity with an HS, where an ultra-small Kerr phase of around 6 *10^{-8} rad was observed with an unprecedented precision of around 3.6* 10^{-10} rad. Moreover, our scheme utilizes an imaginary weak-value, the Kerr non-linearity results in a shift of the mean photon number of the probe, and hence, the scheme is robust to noise originating from the self-phase modulation.
  • Making a "which-way" measurement (WWM) to identify which slit a particle goes through in a double-slit apparatus will reduce the visibility of interference fringes. There has been a long-standing controversy over whether this can be attributed to an uncontrollable momentum transfer. To date, no experiment has characterised the momentum change in a way that relates quantitatively to the loss of visibility. Here, by reconstructing the Bohmian trajectories of single photons, we experimentally obtain the distribution of momentum change, which is observed to be not a momentum kick that occurs at the point of the WWM, but nonclassically accumulates during the propagation of the photons. We further confirm a quantitative relation between the loss of visibility consequent on a WWM and the total (late-time) momentum disturbance. Our results emphasize the role of the Bohmian momentum in giving an intuitive picture of wave-particle duality and complementarity.
  • We propose a superconducting (SC) theory that is valid at vanishing carrier concentration. The pairing interaction is mediated by ferroelectric (FE) modes close to a quantum critical point. For strongly dispersing modes, where forward scattering is the main pairing process, different momentum components of the gap function decouple and the self-consistent equation is solved analytically. At the critical regime of the FE modes, different frequency components are also decoupled. Each momentum, and frequency, component can become nonzero below a different temperature $T_c(\mathbf{k},\omega)$, but can be non-monotonic in temperature. We obtain simple expressions for the gap function and $T_c(\mathbf{k},\omega)$, which do not depend on the density of states at the Fermi surface, making them valid even when the conductance band is empty.
  • Interpretations of quantum mechanics (QM), or proposals for underlying theories, that attempt to present a definite realist picture, such as Bohmian mechanics, require strong non-local effects. Naively, these effects would violate causality and contradict special relativity. However if the theory agrees with QM the violation cannot be observed directly. Here, we demonstrate experimentally such an effect: we steer the velocity and trajectory of a Bohmian particle using a remote measurement. We use a pair of photons and entangle the spatial transverse position of one with the polarization of the other. The first photon is sent to a double-slit-like apparatus, where its trajectory is measured using the technique of Weak Measurements. The other photon is projected to a linear polarization state. The choice of polarization state, and the result, steer the first photon in the most intuitive sense of the word. The effect is indeed shown to be dramatic, while being easy to visualize. We discuss its strength and what are the conditions for it to occur.
  • A century after its conception, quantum mechanics still hold surprises that contradict many "common sense" notions. The contradiction is especially sharp in case one consider trajectories of truly quantum objects such as single photons. From a classical point of view, trajectories are well defined for particles, but not for waves. The wave-particle duality forces a breakdown of this dichotomy and quantum mechanics resolves this in a remarkable way: Trajectories can be well defined, but they are utterly different from classical trajectories. Here, we give an operational definition to the trajectory of a single photon by introducing a novel technique to mark its path using its spectral composition. The method demonstrates that the frequency degree of freedom can be used as a bona fide quantum measurement device (meter). The analysis of a number of setups, using our operational definition, leads to anomalous trajectories which are non-continuous and in some cases do not even connect the source of the photon to where it is detected. We carried out an experimental demonstration of these anomalous trajectories using a nested interferometer. We show that the Two-state vector formalism provides a simple explanation for the results.
  • We discuss the possible connection between superconductivity (SC) and quantum critical points (QCP) for any QCP that is tunable by isotopic mass substitution. We find a distinct contribution to the isotope exponent, due to the proximity to a QCP, which can be used as an experimental signature for the relation between SC and QCP. The relation is demonstrated in a scenario where the SC pairing is due to modes related to a structural instability. Within this model the isotope exponent is derived in terms of microscopic parameters.
  • We investigate the origin of superconductivity in doped SrTiO$_3$ (STO) using a combination of density functional and strong coupling theories within the framework of quantum criticality. Our density functional calculations of the ferroelectric soft mode frequency as a function of doping reveal a crossover from quantum paraelectric to ferroelectric behavior at a doping level coincident with the experimentally observed top of the superconducting dome. Based on this finding, we explore a model in which the superconductivity in STO is enabled by its proximity to the ferroelectric quantum critical point and the soft mode fluctuations provide the pairing interaction on introduction of carriers. Within our model, the low doping limit of the superconducting dome is explained by the emergence of the Fermi surface, and the high doping limit by departure from the quantum critical regime. We predict that the highest critical temperature will increase and shift to lower carrier doping with increasing $^{18}$O isotope substitution, a scenario that is experimentally verifiable.
  • A new type of hidden order in many body systems is explored. This order appears in states which are analogues to charge density waves, or spin density waves, but involve anomalous particle-hole correlations that are odd in relative time and frequency. These states are shown to be inherently different from the usual states of density waves. We discuss two methods to experimentally observe the new type of pairing where a clear distinction between odd and even correlations can be detected: (i) by measuring the density-density correlation, both in time and space and (ii) via the conductivity which, according to the Kubo formula, is given by the current-current correlation. An order parameter for these states is defined and calculated for a simple model, illuminating the physical nature of this order.
  • We study local temperature fluctuations in a 2+1 dimensional CFT on the sphere, dual to a black hole in asymptotically AdS spacetime. The fluctuation spectrum is governed by the lowest-lying hydrodynamic modes of the system whose frequency and damping rate determine whether temperature fluctuations are thermal or quantum. We calculate numerically the corresponding quasinormal frequencies and match the result with the hydrodynamics of the dual CFT at large temperature. As a by-product of our analysis we determine the appropriate boundary conditions for calculating low-lying quasinormal modes for a four-dimensional Reissner-Nordstr\"om black hole in global AdS.
  • Weak measurements with imaginary weak values are reexamined in light of recent experimental results. The shift of the meter, due to the imaginary part of the weak value, is derived via the probability of postselection, which allows considering the meter as a distribution of a classical variable. The derivation results in a simple relation between the change in the distribution and its variance. By applying this relation to several experimental results, in which the meter involved the time and frequency domains, it is shown to be especially suitable for scenarios of that kind. The practical and conceptual implications of a measurement method, which is based on this relation, are discussed.
  • The advantages of weak measurements, and especially measurements of imaginary weak values, for precision enhancement, are discussed. A situation is considered in which the initial state of the measurement device varies randomly on each run, and is shown to be in fact beneficial when imaginary weak values are used. The result is supported by numerical calculation and also provides an explanation for the reduction of technical noise in some recent experimental results. A connection to quantum metrology formalism is made.
  • By assuming that the weak value is real, Ferrie and Combes render their result inapplicable to weak measurement experiments which are aimed at enhancing precision.
  • We report results of a high precision phase estimation based on a weak measurements scheme using commercial light-emitting diode. The method is based on a measurement of the imaginary part of the weak value of a polarization operator. The imaginary part of the weak value appeared due to the measurement interaction itself. The sensitivity of our method is equivalent to resolving light pulses of order of attosecond and it is robust against chromatic dispersion.
  • The concept of a modular value of an observable of a pre- and post-selected quantum system is introduced. It is similar in form and in some cases has a close connection to the weak value of an observable, but instead of describing an effective interaction when the coupling is weak, it describes a coupling of any strength but only to qubit meters. The generalization of the concept for a coupling of a composite system to a multi-qubit meter provides an explanation of some current experiments.