• Sh2-48 is a Galactic HII region located at 3.8 kpc with an O9.5-type star identified at its center. As a part of the FOREST Unbiased Galactic plane Imaging survey using the Nobeyama 45-m telescope (FUGIN) project, we obtained the CO J=1-0 dataset for a large area of Sh2-48 at a spatial resolution of 21"(~0.4 pc), which we used to find a molecular cloud with a total molecular mass of ~3.8x10^4 Mo associated with Sh2-48. The molecular cloud has a systematic velocity shift within a velocity range ~42-47 km/s . On the lower velocity side the CO emission spatially corresponds with the bright 8 {\mu}m filament at the western rim of Sh2-48, while the CO emission at higher velocities is separated at the eastern and western sides of the 8{\mu}m filament. This velocity change forms V-shaped, east-west-oriented feature on the position-velocity diagram. We found that these lower and higher-velocity components are, unlike the infrared and radio continuum data, physically associated with Sh2-48. To interpret the observed V-shaped velocity distribution, we assessed a cloud-cloud collision scenario and found from a comparison between the observations and simulations that the velocity distribution is an expected outcome of a collision between a cylindrical cloud and a spherical cloud, with the cylindrical cloud corresponding to the lower-velocity component, and the two separated components in the higher-velocity part interpretable as the collision-broken remnants of the spherical cloud. Based on the consistency of the ~1.3Myr estimated formation timescale of the HII region with that of the collision, we concluded that the high-mass star formation in Sh2-48 was triggered by the collision.
  • Recent radio observations towards nearby galaxies started to map the whole disk and to identify giant molecular clouds (GMCs) even in the regions between galactic spiral structures. Observed variations of GMC mass functions in different galactic environment indicates that massive GMCs preferentially reside along galactic spiral structures whereas inter-arm regions have many small GMCs. Based on the phase transition dynamics from magnetized warm neutral medium to molecular clouds, Kobayashi et al. 2017 proposes a semi-analytical evolutionary description for GMC mass functions including cloud-cloud collision (CCC) process. Their results show that CCC is less dominant in shaping the mass function of GMCs compared with the accretion of dense HI gas driven by the propagation of supersonic shock waves. However, their formulation does not take into account the possible enhancement of star formation by CCC. Radio observations within the Milky Way indicate the importance of CCC for the formation of star clusters and massive stars. In this article, we reformulate the time evolution equation largely modified from Kobayashi et al. 2017 so that we additionally compute star formation subsequently taking place in CCC clouds. Our results suggest that, although CCC events between smaller clouds outnumber the ones between massive GMCs, CCC-driven star formation is mostly driven by massive GMCs > 10^5.5 Msun (where Msun is the solar mass). The resultant cumulative CCC-driven star formation may amount to a few 10 percent of the total star formation in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies.
  • We carried out synthetic observations of interstellar atomic hydrogen at 21cm wavelength by utilizing the magneto-hydrodynamical numerical simulations of the inhomogeneous turbulent interstellar medium (ISM) Inoue and Inutsuka (2012). The cold neutral medium (CNM) shows significantly clumpy distribution with a small volume filling factor of 3.5%, whereas the warm neutral medium (WNM) distinctly different smooth distribution with a large filling factor of 96.5%. In projection on the sky, the CNM exhibits highly filamentary distribution with a sub-pc width, whereas the WNM shows smooth extended distribution. In the HI optical depth the CNM is dominant and the contribution of the WNM is negligibly small. The CNM has an area covering factor of 30% in projection, while the WNM has a covering factor of 70%. This causes that the emission-absorption measurements toward radio continuum compact sources tend to sample the WNM with a probability of 70%, yielding smaller HI optical depth and smaller HI column density than those of the bulk HI gas. The emission-absorption measurements, which are significantly affected by the small-scale large fluctuations of the CNM properties, are not suitable to characterize the bulk HI gas. Larger-beam emission measurements which are able to fully sample the HI gas will provide a better tool for that purpose, if a reliable proxy for hydrogen column density, possibly dust optical depth and gamma rays, is available.
  • The Orion Nebula Cluster toward the HII region M42 is the most outstanding young cluster at the smallest distance 410pc among the rich high-mass stellar clusters. By newly analyzing the archival molecular data of the 12CO(J=1-0) emission at 21" resolution, we identified at least three pairs of complementary distributions between two velocity components at 8km/s and 13km/s. We present a hypothesis that the two clouds collided with each other and triggered formation of the high-mass stars, mainly toward two regions including the nearly ten O stars, theta1 Ori and theta2 Ori, in M42 and the B star, NU Ori, in M43. The timescale of the collision is estimated to be ~0.1Myr by a ratio of the cloud size and velocity corrected for projection, which is consistent with the age of the youngest cluster members less than 0.1Myr. The majority of the low-mass cluster members were formed prior to the collision in the last one Myr. We discuss implications of the present hypothesis and the scenario of high-mass star formation by comparing with the other eight cases of triggered O star formation via cloud-cloud collision.
  • We compare the magnetic field orientation for the young giant molecular cloud Vela\,C inferred from 500-$\mu$m~polarization maps made with the BLASTPol balloon-borne polarimeter to the orientation of structures in the integrated line emission maps from Mopra observations. Averaging over the entire cloud we find that elongated structures in integrated line-intensity, or zeroth-moment maps, for low density tracers such as $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO~$J$\,$\rightarrow$\,1\,--\,0 are statistically more likely to align parallel to the magnetic field, while intermediate or high density tracers show (on average) a tendency for alignment perpendicular to the magnetic field. This observation agrees with previous studies of the change in relative orientation with column density in Vela\,C, and supports a model where the magnetic field is strong enough to have influenced the formation of dense gas structures within Vela\,C. The transition from parallel to no preferred/perpendicular orientation appears to happen between the densities traced by $^{13}$CO and by C$^{18}$O~$J$\,$\rightarrow$\,1\,--\,0. Using RADEX radiative transfer models to estimate the characteristic number density traced by each molecular line we find that the transition occurs at a molecular hydrogen number density of approximately\,$10^3$\,cm$^{-3}$. We also see that the Centre-Ridge (the highest column density and most active star-forming region within Vela\,C) appears to have a transition at a lower number density, suggesting that this may depend on the evolutionary state of the cloud.
  • We report ALMA Cycle 3 observations in CO isotopes toward a dense core, MC27/L1521F in Taurus, which is considered to be at an early stage of multiple star formation in a turbulent environment. Although most of the high-density parts of this core are considered to be as cold as $\sim$10 K, high-angular resolution ($\sim$20 au) observations in $^{12}$CO ($J$ = 3$-$2) revealed complex warm ($>$15$-$60 K) filamentary/clumpy structures with the sizes from a few tens of au to $\sim$1,000 au. The interferometric observations of $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O show that the densest part with arc-like morphologies associated with previously identified protostar and condensations are slightly redshifted from the systemic velocity of the core. We suggest that the warm CO clouds may be consequences of shock heating induced by interactions among the different density/velocity components originated from the turbulent motions in the core, although how such a fast turbulent flow survives in this very dense medium remains to be studied. The high-angular resolution CO observations are expected to be essential in detecting small-scale turbulent motions in dense cores and to investigate protostar formation therein.
  • We studied roles of the magnetic field on the gas dynamics in the Galactic bulge by a three-dimensional global magnetohydrodynamical simulation data, particularly focusing on vertical flows that are ubiquitously excited by magnetic activity. In local regions where the magnetic filed is stronger, it is frequently seen that fast down-flows slide along inclined magnetic field lines that are associated with buoyantly rising magnetic loops. The vertical velocity of these down-flows reaches ~ 100 km s$^{-1}$ near the foot-point of the loops by the gravitational acceleration toward the Galactic plane. The two footpoints of rising magnetic loops are generally located at different radial locations and the field lines are deformed by the differential rotation. The angular momentum is transported along the field lines, and the radial force balance breaks down. As a result, a fast downflow is often observed only at the one footpoint located at the inner radial position. The fast downflow compresses the gas to form a dense region near the footpoint, which will be important in star formation afterward. Furthermore, the horizontal components of the velocity are also fast near the foot-point because the down-flow is accelerated along the magnetic sliding slope. As a result, the high-velocity flow creates various characteristic features in a simulated position-velocity diagram, depending on the viewing angle.
  • Understanding the mechanism of O star formation is one of the most important issues in current astrophysics. It is also an issue of keen interest how O stars affect their surroundings and trigger secondary star formation. An H\,\emissiontype{II} region RCW79 is one of the typical Spitzer bubbles alongside of RCW120. New observations of CO $J=$ 1--0 emission with Mopra and NANTEN2 revealed that molecular clouds are associated with RCW79 in four velocity components over a velocity range of 20 km s$^{-1}$. We hypothesize that two of the clouds collided with each other and the collision triggered the formation of 12 O stars inside of the bubble and the formation of 54 low mass young stellar objects along the bubble wall. The collision is supported by observational signatures of bridges connecting different velocity components in the colliding clouds. The whole collision process happened in a timescale of $\sim$1 Myr. RCW79 has a larger size by a factor of 30 in the projected area than RCW120 with a single O star, and the large size favored formation of the 12 O stars due to the larger accumulated gas in the collisional shock compression.
  • We carried out a molecular line study toward the three Spitzer bubbles S116, S117 and S118 which show active formation of high-mass stars. We found molecular gas consisting of two components with velocity difference of {$\sim 5$ \kms}. One of them, the small cloud, has typical velocity of {$-63$ \kms} \ and the other, the large cloud, has that of $-58$ \kms. The large cloud has a nearly circular intensity depression whose size is similar to the small cloud. We present an interpretation that the cavity was created by a collision between the two clouds and the collision compressed the gas into a dense layer elongated along the western rim of the small cloud. In this scenario, the O stars including those in the three Spitzer bubbles were formed in the interface layer compressed by the collision. By assuming that the relative motion of the clouds has a tilt of \timeform{45D} to the line of sight, we estimate that the collision continued over the last 1 Myr at relative velocity of $\sim$10 \kms. In the S116--117--118 system the \HII \ regions are located outside of the cavity. This morphology is ascribed to the density-bound distribution of the large cloud which made the \HII \ regions more easily expand toward the outer part of the large cloud than inside of the cavity. The present case proves that a cloud-cloud collision creates a cavity without an action of O star feedback, and suggests that the collision-compressed layer is highly filamentary.
  • Young HII regions are an important site to study O star formation based on distributions of ionized and molecular gas. We revealed that two molecular clouds at $\sim 48$ km s$^{-1}$ and $\sim 53$ km s$^{-1}$ are associated with the HII regions G018.149-00.283 in RCW 166 by using the JCMT CO High-Resolution Survey (COHRS) of the $^{12}$CO ($J$=3--2) emission. G018.149-00.283 comprises a bright ring at 8 $\mu$m and an extended HII region inside the ring. The $\sim 48$ km s$^{-1}$ cloud delineates the ring, and the $\sim 53$ km s$^{-1}$ cloud is located within the ring, indicating a complementary distribution between the two molecular components. We propose a hypothesis that high-mass stars within G018.149-00.283 were formed by triggering in cloud-cloud collision at a projected velocity separation of $\sim 5$ km s$^{-1}$. We argue that G018.149-00.283 is in an early evolutionary stage, $\sim 0.1$ Myr after the collision according to the scheme by [hab92] which will be followed by a bubble formation stage like RCW 120. We also suggested that nearby HII regions N21 and N22 are candidates for bubbles possibly formed by cloud-cloud collision. [ino13] showed that the interface gas becomes highly turbulent and realizes a high-mass accretion rate of $10^{-3}$ -- $10^{-4}$ $M_{\odot}$ $/$yr by magnetohydrodynamical numerical simulations, which offers an explanation of the O-star formation. A fairly high frequency of cloud-cloud collision in RCW 166 is probably due to the high cloud density in this part of the Scutum arm.
  • Formation mechanism of a supergiant H II region NGC 604 is discussed in terms of collision of H I clouds in M33. An analysis of the archival H I data obtained with the Very Large Array (VLA) reveals complex velocity distributions around NGC 604. The H I clouds are composed of two velocity components separated by ~ 20 km s^-1 for an extent of ~ 700 pc, beyond the size of the the H II region. Although the H I clouds are not easily separated in velocity with some mixed component represented by merged line profiles, the atomic gas mass amounts to 6 x 10^6 M_Sol and 9 x 10^6 M_Sol for each component. These characteristics of H I gas and the distributions of dense molecular gas in the overlapping regions of the two velocity components suggest that the formation of giant molecular clouds and the following massive cluster formation have been induced by the collision of H I clouds with different velocities. Referring to the existence of gas bridging feature connecting M33 with M31 reported by large-scale HI surveys, the disturbed atomic gas possibly represent the result of past tidal interaction between the two galaxies, which is analogous to the formation of the R136 cluster in the LMC.
  • A collision between two molecular clouds is one possible candidate for high-mass star formation. The HII region RCW 36, located in the Vela molecular ridge, contains a young star cluster with two O-type stars. We present new CO observations of RCW 36 with NANTEN2, Mopra, and ASTE using $^{12}$CO($J$ = 1-0, 2-1, 3-2) and $^{13}$CO($J$ = 2-1) line emissions. We have discovered two molecular clouds lying at the velocities $V_\mathrm{LSR} \sim$5.5 and 9 km s$^{-1}$. Both clouds are likely to be physically associated with the star cluster, as verified by the good spatial correspondence among the two clouds, infrared filaments, and the star cluster. We also found a high intensity ratio of $\sim$0.6-1.2 for CO $J$ = 3-2 / 1-0 toward both clouds, indicating that the gas temperature has been increased due to heating by the O-type stars. We propose that the O-type stars in RCW 36 were formed by a collision between the two clouds, with a relative velocity separation of 5 km s$^{-1}$. The complementary spatial distributions and the velocity separation of the two clouds are in good agreement with observational signatures expected for O-type star formation triggered by a cloud-cloud collision. We also found a displacement between the complementary spatial distributions of the two clouds, which we estimate to be 0.3 pc assuming the collision angle to be 45$^{\circ}$ relative to the line-of-sight. We estimate the collision timescale to be $\sim$10$^5$ yr. It is probable that the cluster age by Ellerbroek et al. (2013b) is dominated by the low-mass members which were not formed under the triggering by cloud-cloud collision, and that the O-type stars in the center of the cluster are explained by the collisional triggering independently from the low-mass star formation.
  • We report an observational study of the giant molecular cloud (GMC) associated with the Galactic infrared ring-like structure N35 and two nearby HII regions G024.392+00.072 (HII region A) and G024.510-00.060 (HII region B), using the new CO J=1-0 data obtained as a part of the FOREST Unbiased Galactic Plane Imaging survey with the Nobeyama 45-m telescope (FUGIN) project at a spatial resolution of 21". Our CO data revealed that the GMC having a total molecular mass of 2.1x10^6Msun has two velocity components over ~10-15km/s. Majority of molecular gas in the GMC is included in the lower velocity component (LVC) at ~110-114km/s, while the higher velocity components (HVCs) at ~118-126km/s consist of three smaller molecular clouds which are located near the three HII regions. The LVC and HVCs show spatially complementary distributions along the line-of-sight despite of large velocity separations of ~5-15km/s, and are connected in velocity by the CO emission with intermediate intensities. By comparing between the observations and simulations, we discuss a scenario that collisions of the three HVCs with LVC at velocities of ~10-15km/s can interpret these two observational signatures. The intermediate velocity features between the LVC and HVCs can be understood as broad bridge features, which indicate turbulent motion of gas at the interfaces of the collisions, while the spatially complementary distributions represent the cavities created in the LVC by the HVCs through the collisions. Our model indicates that the three HII regions were formed after the onset of the collisions, and it is therefore suggested that the high-mass star formation in the GMC was triggered by the collisions.
  • We report the first extragalactic detection of the complex organic molecules (COMs) dimethyl ether (CH$_3$OCH$_3$) and methyl formate (CH$_3$OCHO) with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). These COMs together with their parent species methanol (CH$_3$OH), were detected toward two 1.3 mm continuum sources in the N 113 star-forming region in the low-metallicity Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Rotational temperatures ($T_{\rm rot}\sim130$ K) and total column densities ($N_{\rm rot}\sim10^{16}$ cm$^{-2}$) have been calculated for each source based on multiple transitions of CH$_3$OH. We present the ALMA molecular emission maps for COMs and measured abundances for all detected species. The physical and chemical properties of two sources with COMs detection, and the association with H$_2$O and OH maser emission indicate that they are hot cores. The fractional abundances of COMs scaled by a factor of 2.5 to account for the lower metallicity in the LMC are comparable to those found at the lower end of the range in Galactic hot cores. Our results have important implications for studies of organic chemistry at higher redshift.
  • We carried out new CO ($J=$1-0, 2-1 and 3-2) observations with NANTEN2 and ASTE in the region of the twin Galactic mini-starbursts NGC 6334 and NGC 6357. We detected two velocity molecular components of 12 km s$^{-1}$ velocity separation, which is continuous over 3 degrees along the plane. In NGC 6334 the two components show similar two-peaked intensity distributions toward the young HII regions and are linked by a bridge feature. In NGC 6357 we found spatially complementary distribution between the two velocity components as well as a bridge feature in velocity. Based on these results we hypothesize that the two clouds in the two regions collided with each other in the past few Myr and triggered formation of the starbursts over $\sim$ 100 pc. We suggest that the formation of the starbursts happened toward the collisional region of $\sim$ 10-pc extents with initial high molecular column densities. For NGC 6334 we present a scenario which includes spatial variation of the colliding epoch due to non-uniform cloud separation. The scenario possibly explains the apparent age difference among the young O stars in NGC 6334 raging from $10^4$ yrs to $10^6$ yrs; the latest collision happened within $10^5$ yrs toward the youngest stars in NGC 6334 I(N) and I which exhibit molecular outflows without HII regions. For NGC 6357 the O stars were formed a few Myrs ago, and the cloud dispersal by the O stars is significant. We conclude that cloud-cloud collision offers a possible explanation of the min-starburst over a 100-pc scale.
  • We made CO ($J$ = 1--0, 2--1, and 3--2) observations toward an H{\sc ii} region RCW~32 in the Vela Molecular Ridge. The CO gas distribution associated with the H{\sc ii} region was revealed for the first time at a high resolution of 22 arcsec. The results revealed three distinct velocity components which show correspondence with the optical dark lanes and/or H$\alpha$ distribution. Two of the components show complementary spatial distribution which suggests collisional interaction between them at a relative velocity of $\sim$4 km~s$^{-1}$. Based on these results, we present a hypothesis that cloud-cloud collision determined the cloud distribution and triggered formation of the exciting star ionizing RCW~32. The collision time scale is estimated from the cloud size and the velocity separation to be $\sim$2 Myrs and the collision terminated $\sim$1 Myr ago, which is consistent with an age of the exciting star and the associated cluster. By combing the previous works on the H{\sc ii} regions in the Vela Molecular Ridge, we argue that the majority, at least four, of the H{\sc ii} regions in the Ridge were formed by triggering of cloud-cloud collision.
  • High-mass star formation is an important step which controls galactic evolution. GM 24 is a heavily obscured star cluster including a single O9 star with more than $\sim$100 lower mass stars within a 0.3 pc radius toward $(l,b)\sim$ (350.$^{\circ}$5, 0.$^{\circ}$96), close to the Galactic min-starburst NGC 6334. We found two velocity components associated with the cluster by new observations of $^{12}$CO $J=$ 2-1 emission, whereas the cloud was previously considered to be single. We found the distribution of the two components of $5$ km s$^{-1}$ separation shows complementary distribution which fits well with each other, if a relative displacement of 3 pc is applied along the Galactic plane. A position-velocity diagram of the GM 24 cloud is explained by a model based on the numerical simulations of two colliding clouds, where an intermediate velocity component created by collision is taken into account. We estimate the collision time scale to be $\sim$Myr in projection of a relative motion titled to the line of sight by 45 degrees. The results lend further support for cloud-cloud collision as a major mechanism of high-mass star formation in the Carina-Sagittarius Arm.
  • We report a possibility that the high-mass star located in the HII region RCW 34 was formed by a triggering induced by a collision of molecular clouds. Molecular gas distributions of the $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO $J=$2-1, and $^{12}$CO $J=$3-2 lines toward RCW 34 were measured by using the NANTEN2 and ASTE telescopes. We found two clouds with the velocity ranges of 0-10 km s$^{-1}$ and 10-14 km s$^{-1}$. Whereas the former cloud as massive as ~2.7 x 10$^{4}$ Msun has a morphology similar to the ring-like structure observed in the infrared wavelengths, the latter cloud with the mass of ~10$^{3}$ Msun, which has not been recognized by previous observations, distributes just likely to cover the bubble enclosed by the other cloud. The high-mass star with the spectral types of O8.5V is located near the boundary of the two clouds. The line intensity ratio of $^{12}$CO $J=$3-2 / $J=$2-1 yields high values (~1.5) in the neighborhood of the high-mass star, suggesting that these clouds are associated with the massive star. We also confirmed that the obtained position-velocity diagram shows a similar distribution with that derived by a numerical simulation of the supersonic collision of two clouds. Using the relative velocity between the two clouds (~5 km s$^{-1}$), the collisional time scale is estimated to be $\sim$0.2 Myr with the assumption of the distance of 2.5 kpc. These results suggest that the high-mass star in RCW 34 was formed rapidly within a time scale of ~0.2 Myr via a triggering of cloud-cloud collision.
  • We observed molecular clouds in the W33 high-mass star-forming region associated with compact and extended HII regions using the NANTEN2 telescope as well as the Nobeyama 45-m telescope in the $J=$1-0 transitions of $^{12}$CO, $^{13}$CO, and C$^{18}$O as a part of the FOREST Unbiased Galactic plane Imaging survey with the Nobeyama 45-m telescope (FUGIN) legacy survey. We detected three velocity components at 35 km s$^{-1}$, 45 km s$^{-1}$, and 58 km s$^{-1}$. The 35 km s$^{-1}$ and 58 km s$^{-1}$ clouds are likely to be physically associated with W33 because of the enhanced $^{12}$CO $J=$ 3-2 to $J=$1-0 intensity ratio as $R_{\rm 3-2/1-0} > 1.0$ due to the ultraviolet irradiation by OB stars, and morphological correspondence between the distributions of molecular gas and the infrared and radio continuum emissions excited by high-mass stars. The two clouds show complementary distributions around W33. The velocity separation is too large to be gravitationally bound, and yet not explained by expanding motion by stellar feedback. Therefore, we discuss that a cloud-cloud collision scenario likely explains the high-mass star formation in W33.
  • The shell-type supernova remnant HESS J1731$-$347 emits TeV gamma-rays, and is a key object for the study of the cosmic ray acceleration potential of supernova remnants. We use 0.5-1 arcminute Mopra CO/CS(1-0) data in conjunction with HI data to calculate column densities towards the HESS J1731$-$347 region. We trace gas within at least four Galactic arms, typically tracing total (atomic+molecular) line-of-sight H column densities of 2-3$\times$10$^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$. Assuming standard X-factor values and that most of the HI/CO emission seen towards HESS J1731$-$347 is on the near-side of the Galaxy, X-ray absorption column densities are consistent with HI+CO-derived column densities foreground to, but not beyond, the Scutum-Crux Galactic arm, suggesting a kinematic distance of $\sim$3.2 kpc for HESS J1731$-$347. At this kinematic distance, we also find dense, infrared-dark gas traced by CS(1-0) emission coincident with the north of HESS J1731$-$347, the nearby HII region G353.43$-$0.37 and the nearby unidentified gamma-ray source HESS J1729$-$345. This dense gas lends weight to the idea that HESS J1729$-$345 and HESS J1731-347 are connected, perhaps via escaping cosmic-rays.
  • We present high-resolution (sub-parsec) observations of a giant molecular cloud in the nearest star-forming galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. ALMA Band 6 observations trace the bulk of the molecular gas in $^{12}$CO(2-1) and high column density regions in $^{13}$CO(2-1). Our target is a quiescent cloud (PGCC G282.98-32.40, which we refer to as the "Planck cold cloud" or PCC) in the southern outskirts of the galaxy where star-formation activity is very low and largely confined to one location. We decompose the cloud into structures using a dendrogram and apply an identical analysis to matched-resolution cubes of the 30 Doradus molecular cloud (located near intense star formation) for comparison. Structures in the PCC exhibit roughly 10 times lower surface density and 5 times lower velocity dispersion than comparably sized structures in 30 Dor, underscoring the non-universality of molecular cloud properties. In both clouds, structures with relatively higher surface density lie closer to simple virial equilibrium, whereas lower surface density structures tend to exhibit super-virial line widths. In the PCC, relatively high line widths are found in the vicinity of an infrared source whose properties are consistent with a luminous young stellar object. More generally, we find that the smallest resolved structures ("leaves") of the dendrogram span close to the full range of line widths observed across all scales. As a result, while the bulk of the kinetic energy is found on the largest scales, the small-scale energetics tend to be dominated by only a few structures, leading to substantial scatter in observed size-linewidth relationships.
  • We report ALMA observations in 0.87 mm continuum and $^{12}$CO ($J$ = 3--2) toward a very low-luminosity ($<$0.1 $L_{\odot}$) protostar, which is deeply embedded in one of the densest core, MC27/L1521F, in Taurus with an indication of multiple star formation in a highly dynamical environment. The beam size corresponds to $\sim$20 AU, and we have clearly detected blueshifted/redshifted gas in $^{12}$CO associated with the protostar. The spatial/velocity distributions of the gas show there is a rotating disk with a size scale of $\sim$10 AU, a disk mass of $\sim$10$^{-4}$ $M_{\odot}$ and a central stellar mass of $\sim$0.2 $M_{\odot}$. The observed disk seems to be detachedfrom the surrounding dense gas although it is still embedded at the center of the core whose density is $\sim$10$^{6}$ cm$^{-3}$. The current low outflow activity and the very-low luminosity indicate that the mass accretion rate onto the protostar is extremely low in spite of a very early stage of star formation. We may be witnessing the final stage of the formation of $\sim$0.2 $M_{\odot}$ protostar. However, we cannot explain the observed low-luminosity with the standard pre-main-sequence evolutionary track, unless we assume cold accretion with an extremely small initial radius of the protostar ($\sim$0.65 $R_\odot$). These facts may challenge our current understanding of the low-mass star formation, in particular, the mass accretion process onto the protostar and the circumstellar disk.
  • NGC 2359 is an HII region located in the outer Galaxy that contains the isolated Wolf-Rayet (WR) star HD 56925. We present millimeter/submillimeter observations of $^{12}$CO($J$ = 1-0, 3-2) line emission toward the entire nebula. We identified that there are three molecular clouds at VLSR $\sim$37, $\sim$54, and $\sim$67 km s$^{-1}$, and three HI clouds: two of them are at VLSR $\sim$54 km s$^{-1}$ and the other is at $\sim$63 km s$^{-1}$. These clouds except for the CO cloud at 67 km s$^{-1}$ are limb-brightened in the radio continuum, suggesting part of each cloud has been ionized. We newly found an expanding gas motion of CO/HI, whose center and expansion velocities are $\sim$51 and $\sim$4.5 km s$^{-1}$, respectively. This is consistent with large line widths of the CO and HI clouds at 54 km s$^{-1}$. The kinematic temperature of CO clouds at 37 and 54 km s$^{-1}$ are derived to be 17 and 61 K, respectively, whereas that of the CO cloud at 67 km s$^{-1}$ is only 6 K, indicating that the former two clouds have been heated by strong UV radiation. We concluded that the 37 and 54 km s$^{-1}$ CO clouds and three HI clouds are associated with NGC 2359, even if these clouds have different velocities. Although the velocity difference including the expanding motion are typical signatures of the stellar feedback from the exciting star, our analysis revealed that the observed large momentum for the 37 km s$^{-1}$ CO cloud cannot be explained only by the total wind momentum of the WR star and its progenitor. We therefore propose an alternative scenario that the isolated high-mass progenitor of HD 56925 was formed by a collision between the CO clouds at 37 and 54 km s$^{-1}$. If we apply the collision scenario, NGC 2359 corresponds to the final phase of the cloud-cloud collision.
  • Recent observations suggest that intensive molecular cloud collision can trigger massive star/cluster formation. The most important physical process caused by the collision is a shock compression. In this paper, the influence of a shock wave on the evolution of a molecular cloud is studied numerically by using isothermal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with the effect of self-gravity. Adaptive-mesh-refinement and sink particle techniques are used to follow long-time evolution of the shocked cloud. We find that the shock compression of turbulent inhomogeneous molecular cloud creates massive filaments, which lie perpendicularly to the background magnetic field as we have pointed out in a previous paper. The massive filament shows global collapse along the filament, which feeds a sink particle located at the collapse center. We observe high accretion rate dot{M}_acc > 10^{-4} M_sun/yr that is high enough to allow the formation of even O-type stars. The most massive sink particle achieves M>50 M_sun in a few times 10^5 yr after the onset of the filament collapse.
  • We have performed Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations in $^{12}$CO($J=2-1$), $^{13}$CO($J=2-1$), C$^{18}$O($J=2-1$), $^{12}$CO($J=3-2$), $^{13}$CO($J=3-2$), and CS($J=7-6$) lines toward the active star-forming region N83C in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), whose metallicity is $\sim$ 1/5 of the Milky Way (MW). The ALMA observations first reveal sub-pc scale molecular structures in $^{12}$CO($J=2-1$) and $^{13}$CO($J=2-1$) emission. We found strong CO peaks associated with young stellar objects (YSOs) identified by the $Spitzer$ Space Telescope, and also found that overall molecular gas is distributed along the edge of the neighboring HII region. We derived a gas density of $\sim 10^4$ cm$^{-3}$ in molecular clouds associated with YSOs based on the virial mass estimated from $^{12}$CO($J=2-1$) emission. This high gas density is presumably due to the effect of the HII region under the low-metallicity (accordingly small-dust content) environment in the SMC; far-UV radiation from the HII region can easily penetrate and photo-dissociate the outer layer of $^{12}$CO molecules in the molecular clouds, and thus only the innermost parts of the molecular clouds are observed even in $^{12}$CO emission. We obtained the CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor $X_{\rm CO}$ of $7.5 \times 10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$ (K km s$^{-1}$)$^{-1}$ in N83C based on virial masses and CO luminosities, which is four times larger than that in the MW, 2 $\times 10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$ (K km s$^{-1}$)$^{-1}$. We also discuss the difference in the nature between two high-mass YSOs, each of which is associated with a molecular clump with a mass of about a few $\times 10^3 M_{\odot}$.