• While various observations measured ellipticities of galaxy clusters and alignments between orientations of the brightest cluster galaxies and their host clusters, there are only a handful of numerical simulations that implement realistic baryon physics to allow direct comparisons with those observations. Here we investigate ellipticities of galaxy clusters and alignments between various components of them and the central galaxies in the state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamical simulation Horizon-AGN, which contains dark matter, stellar, and gas components in a large simulation box of $(100 h^{-1}$ Mpc$)^3$ with high spatial resolution ($\sim1$ kpc). We estimate ellipticities of total matter, dark matter, stellar, gas surface mass density distributions, X-ray surface brightness, and the Compton $y$-parameter of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, as well as alignments between these components and the central galaxies for 120 projected images of galaxy clusters with masses $M_{200}>5\times10^{13}M_{\odot}$. Our results indicate that the distributions of these components are well aligned with the major-axes of the central galaxies, with the root mean square value of differences of their position angles of $\sim 20^\circ$, which vary little from inner to the outer regions. We also estimate alignments of these various components with total matter distributions, and find tighter alignments than those for central galaxies with the root mean square value of $\sim 15^\circ$. We compare our results with previous observations of ellipticities and position angle alignments and find reasonable agreements. The comprehensive analysis presented in this paper provides useful prior information for analyzing stacked lensing signals as well as designing future observations to study ellipticities and alignments of galaxy clusters.
  • We perform a systematic search for rings around 168 Kepler planet candidates with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios that are selected from all the short-cadence data. We fit ringed and ringless models to their lightcurves, and compare the fitting results to search for the signatures of planetary rings. First, we identify 29 tentative systems, for which the ringed models exhibit statistically significant improvement over the ringless models. The lightcurves of those systems are individually examined, but we are not able to identify any candidate that indicates evidence for rings. In turn, we find out several mechanisms of false-positives that would produce ring-like signals, and the null detection enables us to place upper limits on the size of rings. Furthermore, assuming the tidal alignment between axes of the planetary rings and orbits, we conclude that the occurrence rate of rings larger than twice the planetary radius is less than 15 percent. Even though the majority of our targets are short-period planets, our null detection provides statistical and quantitative constraints on largely uncertain theoretical models of origin, formation, and evolution of planetary rings.
  • Hiroaki Aihara, Robert Armstrong, Steven Bickerton, James Bosch, Jean Coupon, Hisanori Furusawa, Yusuke Hayashi, Hiroyuki Ikeda, Yukiko Kamata, Hiroshi Karoji, Satoshi Kawanomoto, Michitaro Koike, Yutaka Komiyama, Robert H. Lupton, Sogo Mineo, Hironao Miyatake, Satoshi Miyazaki, Tomoki Morokuma, Yoshiyuki Obuchi, Yukie Oishi, Yuki Okura, Paul A. Price, Tadafumi Takata, Manobu M. Tanaka, Masayuki Tanaka, Yoko Tanaka, Tomohisa Uchida, Fumihiro Uraguchi, Yousuke Utsumi, Shiang-Yu Wang, Yoshihiko Yamada, Hitomi Yamanoi, Naoki Yasuda, Nobuo Arimoto, Masashi Chiba, Francois Finet, Hiroki Fujimori, Seiji Fujimoto, Junko Furusawa, Tomotsugu Goto, Andy Goulding, James E. Gunn, Yuichi Harikane, Takashi Hattori, Masao Hayashi, Krzysztof G. Helminiak, Ryo Higuchi, Chiaki Hikage, Paul T.P. Ho, Bau-Ching Hsieh, Kuiyun Huang, Song Huang, Masatoshi Imanishi, Ikuru Iwata, Anton T. Jaelani, Hung-Yu Jian, Nobunari Kashikawa, Nobuhiko Katayama, Takashi Kojima, Akira Konno, Shintaro Koshida, Haruka Kusakabe, Alexie Leauthaud, C.-H. Lee, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Rachel Mandelbaum, Yoshiki Matsuoka, Elinor Medezinski, Shoken Miyama, Rieko Momose, Anupreeta More, Surhud More, Shiro Mukae, Ryoma Murata, Hitoshi Murayama, Tohru Nagao, Fumiaki Nakata, Hiroko Niikura, Atsushi J. Nishizawa, Masamune Oguri, Nobuhiro Okabe, Yoshiaki Ono, Masato Onodera, Masafusa Onoue, Masami Ouchi, Tae-Soo Pyo, Takatoshi Shibuya, Kazuhiro Shimasaku, Melanie Simet, Joshua Speagle, David N. Spergel, Michael A. Strauss, Yuma Sugahara, Naoshi Sugiyama, Yasushi Suto, Nao Suzuki, Philip J. Tait, Masahiro Takada, Tsuyoshi Terai, Yoshiki Toba, Edwin L. Turner, Hisakazu Uchiyama, Keiichi Umetsu, Yuji Urata, Tomonori Usuda, Sherry Yeh, Suraphong Yuma
    The Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP) is a three-layered imaging survey aimed at addressing some of the most outstanding questions in astronomy today, including the nature of dark matter and dark energy. The survey has been awarded 300 nights of observing time at the Subaru Telescope and it started in March 2014. This paper presents the first public data release of HSC-SSP. This release includes data taken in the first 1.7 years of observations (61.5 nights) and each of the Wide, Deep, and UltraDeep layers covers about 108, 26, and 4 square degrees down to depths of i~26.4, ~26.5, and ~27.0 mag, respectively (5sigma for point sources). All the layers are observed in five broad bands (grizy), and the Deep and UltraDeep layers are observed in narrow bands as well. We achieve an impressive image quality of 0.6 arcsec in the i-band in the Wide layer. We show that we achieve 1-2 per cent PSF photometry (rms) both internally and externally (against Pan-STARRS1), and ~10 mas and 40 mas internal and external astrometric accuracy, respectively. Both the calibrated images and catalogs are made available to the community through dedicated user interfaces and database servers. In addition to the pipeline products, we also provide value-added products such as photometric redshifts and a collection of public spectroscopic redshifts. Detailed descriptions of all the data can be found online. The data release website is https://hsc-release.mtk.nao.ac.jp/.
  • Detection of a planetary ring of exoplanets remains as one of the most attractive but challenging goals in the field. We present a methodology of a systematic search for exoplanetary rings via transit photometry of long-period planets. The methodology relies on a precise integration scheme we develop to compute a transit light curve of a ringed planet. We apply the methodology to 89 long-period planet candidates from the Kepler data so as to estimate, and/or set upper limits on, the parameters of possible rings. While a majority of our samples do not have a sufficiently good signal-to-noise ratio for meaningful constraints on ring parameters, we find that six systems with a higher signal-to-noise ratio are inconsistent with the presence of a ring larger than 1.5 times the planetary radius assuming a grazing orbit and a tilted ring. Furthermore, we identify five preliminary candidate systems whose light curves exhibit ring-like features. After removing four false positives due to the contamination from nearby stars, we identify KIC 10403228 as a reasonable candidate for a ringed planet. A systematic parameter fit of its light curve with a ringed planet model indicates two possible solutions corresponding to a Saturn-like planet with a tilted ring. There also remain other two possible scenarios accounting for the data; a circumstellar disk and a hierarchical triple. Due to large uncertain factors, we cannot choose one specific model among the three.
  • We investigate the formation of close-in planets in near-coplanar eccentric hierarchical triple systems via the secular interaction between an inner planet and an outer perturber (Coplanar High-eccentricity Migration, CHEM). We generalize the previous work on the analytical condition for successful CHEM for point masses interacting only through gravity by taking into account the finite mass effect of the inner planet. We find that efficient CHEM requires that the systems should have m_1<<m_0 and m_1<<m_2. In addition to the gravity for point masses, we examine the importance of the short-range forces, and provide an analytical estimate of the migration time scale. We perform a series of numerical simulations in CHEM for systems consisting of a sun-like central star, giant gas inner planet and planetary outer perturber, including the short-range forces and stellar and planetary dissipative tides. We find that most of such systems end up with a tidal disruption, a small fraction of the systems produce prograde hot Jupiters (HJs), but no retrograde one. In addition, we extend CHEM to super-Earth mass range, and show that the formation of close-in super-Earths in prograde orbits is also possible. Finally, we carry out CHEM simulation for the observed hierarchical triple and counter-orbiting HJ systems. We find that CHEM can explain a part of the former systems, but it is generally very difficult to reproduce counter-orbiting HJ systems.
  • We characterize the non-sphericity of galaxy clusters by the projected axis ratio of spatial distribution of star, dark matter, and X-ray surface brightness (XSB). We select 40 simulated groups and clusters of galaxies with mass larger than 5E13 Msun from the Horizon simulation that fully incorporates the relevant baryon physics, in particular, the AGN feedback. We find that the baryonic physics around the central region of galaxy clusters significantly affects the non-sphericity of dark matter distribution even beyond the central region, approximately up to the half of the virial radius. Therefore it is very difficult to predict the the probability density function (PDF) of the projected axis ratio of XSB from dark-matter only N-body simulations as attempted in previous studies. Indeed we find that the PDF derived from our simulated clusters exhibits much better agreement with that from the observed X-ray clusters. This indicates that our present methodology to estimate the non-sphericity directly from the Horizon simulation is useful and promising. Further improvements in both numerical modeling and observational data will establish the non-sphericity of clusters as a cosmological test complementary to more conventional statistics based on spherically averaged quantities.
  • We revisit the non-sphericity of cluster-mass scale halos from cosmological N-body simulation on the basis of triaxial modelling. In order to understand the difference between the simulation results and the conventional ellipsoidal collapse model (EC), we first consider the evolution of individual simulated halos. The major difference between EC and the simulation becomes appreciable after the turn-around epoch. Moreover, it is sensitive to the individual evolution history of each halo. Despite such strong dependence on individual halos, the resulting nonsphericity of halos exhibits weak but robust mass dependence in a statistical fashion; massive halos are more spherical up to the turn-around, but gradually become less spherical by z = 0. This is clearly inconsistent with the EC prediction; massive halos are usually more spherical. In addition, at z=0, inner regions of the halos are less spherical than outer regions, i.e., the density distribution inside the halos is highly inhomogeneous and therefore not self-similar. Since most of previous fitting formulae for the PDF of axis ratio of triaxial ellipsoids have been constructed under the self-similarity assumption, they are not accurate. Indeed, we compute the PDF of projected axis ratio a1/a2 directly from the simulation data without the self-similarity assumption, and find that it is very sensitive to the assumption. The latter needs to be carefully taken into account in direct comparison with observations, and therefore we provide an empirical fitting formula for the PDF of a1/a2. Our preliminary analysis suggests that the derived PDF of a1/a2 roughly agrees with the current weak-lensing observations. More importantly, the present results will be useful in future exploration of the non-sphericity of clusters in X-ray and optical observations.
  • Naoyuki Tamura, Naruhisa Takato, Atsushi Shimono, Yuki Moritani, Kiyoto Yabe, Yuki Ishizuka, Akitoshi Ueda, Yukiko Kamata, Hrand Aghazarian, Stephane Arnouts, Gabriel Barban, Robert H. Barkhouser, Renato C. Borges, David F. Braun, Michael A. Carr, Pierre-Yves Chabaud, Yin-Chang Chang, Hsin-Yo Chen, Masashi Chiba, Richard C. Y. Chou, You-Hua Chu, Judith G. Cohen, Rodrigo P. de Almeida, Antonio C. de Oliveira, Ligia S. de Oliveira, Richard G. Dekany, Kjetil Dohlen, Jesulino B. dos Santos, Leandro H. dos Santos, Richard S. Ellis, Maximilian Fabricius, Didier Ferrand, Decio Ferreira, Mirek Golebiowski, Jenny E. Greene, Johannes Gross, James E. Gunn, Randolph Hammond, Albert Harding, Murdock Hart, Timothy M. Heckman, Christopher M. Hirata, Paul Ho, Stephen C. Hope, Larry Hovland, Shu-Fu Hsu, Yen-Shan Hu, Ping-Jie Huang, Marc Jaquet, Yipeng Jing, Jennifer Karr, Masahiko Kimura, Matthew E. King, Eiichiro Komatsu, Vincent Le Brun, Olivier Le Fevre, Arnaud Le Fur, David Le Mignant, Hung-Hsu Ling, Craig P. Loomis, Robert H. Lupton, Fabrice Madec, Peter Mao, Lucas S. Marrara, Claudia Mendes de Oliveira, Yosuke Minowa, Chaz N. Morantz, Hitoshi Murayama, Graham J. Murray, Youichi Ohyama, Joseph Orndorff, Sandrine Pascal, Jefferson M. Pereira, Daniel J. Reiley, Martin Reinecke, Andreas Ritter, Mitsuko Roberts, Mark A. Schwochert, Michael D. Seiffert, Stephen A. Smee, Laerte Sodre Jr., David N. Spergel, Aaron J. Steinkraus, Michael A. Strauss, Christian Surace, Yasushi Suto, Nao Suzuki, John Swinbank, Philip J. Tait, Masahiro Takada, Tomonori Tamura, Yoko Tanaka, Laurence Tresse, Orlando Verducci Jr., Didier Vibert, Clement Vidal, Shiang-Yu Wang, Chih-Yi Wen, Chi-Hung Yan, Naoki Yasuda
    PFS (Prime Focus Spectrograph), a next generation facility instrument on the 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope, is a very wide-field, massively multiplexed, optical and near-infrared spectrograph. Exploiting the Subaru prime focus, 2394 reconfigurable fibers will be distributed over the 1.3 deg field of view. The spectrograph has been designed with 3 arms of blue, red, and near-infrared cameras to simultaneously observe spectra from 380nm to 1260nm in one exposure at a resolution of ~1.6-2.7A. An international collaboration is developing this instrument under the initiative of Kavli IPMU. The project is now going into the construction phase aiming at undertaking system integration in 2017-2018 and subsequently carrying out engineering operations in 2018-2019. This article gives an overview of the instrument, current project status and future paths forward.
  • Among a hundred transiting planets with a measured projected spin-orbit angle {\lambda}, several systems are suggested to be counter-orbiting. While they may be due to the projection effect, the mechanism to produce a counter-orbiting planet is not established. A promising scenario for the counter-orbiting planets is the extreme eccentricity evolution in near-coplanar hierarchical triple systems with eccentric inner and outer or- bits. We examine this scenario in detail by performing a series of systematic numerical simulations, and consider the possibility of forming hot Jupiters, especially counter- orbiting one under this mechanism with a distant sub-stellar perturber. We incorporate quadrupole and octupole secular gravitational interaction between the two orbits, and also short-range forces (correction for general relativity, star and inner planetary tide and rotational distortion) simultaneously. We find that most of systems are tidally disrupted and that a small fraction of survived planets turns out to be prograde. The formation of counter-orbiting hot Jupiters in this scenario is possible only in a very restricted parameter region, and thus very unlikely in practice.
  • Analysis of transit times in exoplanetary systems accurately provides an instantaneous orbital period, $P(t)$, of their member planets. A long-term monitoring of those transiting planetary systems puts limits on the variability of $P(t)$, which are translated into the constraints on the time variation of the gravitational constant $G$. We apply this analysis to $10$ transiting systems observed by the Kepler spacecraft, and find that $\Delta G/G\lesssim 5\times10^{-6}$ for 2009-2013, or $\dot{G}/G \lesssim 10^{-6}\,\mathrm{yr}^{-1}$ if $\dot{G}$ is constant. While the derived limit is weaker than those from other analyses, it is complementary to them and can be improved by analyzing numerous transiting systems that are continuously monitored.
  • We perform image stacking analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometric galaxies over the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) maps at 65{\mu}m, 90{\mu}m, and 140{\mu}m. The resulting image profiles are decomposed into the central galaxy component (single term) and the nearby galaxy component (clustering term), as a function of the r-band magnitude, m_r of the central galaxy. We find that the mean far-infrared (FIR) flux of a galaxy with magnitude m_r is well fitted with f^s_{90{\mu}m}=13*10^{0.306(18-m_r)}[mJy]. The FIR amplitude of the clustering term is consistent with that expected from the angular-correlation function of the SDSS galaxies, but galaxy morphology dependence needs to be taken into account for a more quantitative conclusion. We also fit the spectral energy distribution of stacked galaxies at 65{\mu}m, 90{\mu}m, and 140{\mu}m, and derive a mean dust temperature of ~30K. This is consistent with the typical dust temperature of galaxies that are FIR luminous and individually detected.
  • The top-hat spherical collapse model (TSC) is one of the most fundamental analytical frameworks to describe the non-linear growth of cosmic structure. TSC has motivated, and been widely applied in, various researches even in the current era of precision cosmology. While numerous studies exist to examine its validity against numerical simulations in a statistical fashion, there are few analyses to compare the TSC dynamics in an individual object-wise basis, which is what we attempt in the present paper. We extract 100 halos at z = 0 from a cosmological N-body simulation according to the conventional TSC criterion for the spherical over-density. Then we trace back their spherical counter-parts at earlier epochs. Just prior to the turn-around epoch of the halos, their dynamics is well approximated by TSC, but their turn-around epochs are systematically delayed and the virial radii are larger by ~ 20 percent on average relative to the TSC predictions. We find that this systematic deviation is mainly ascribed to the non-uniformity/inhomogeneity of dark matter density profiles and the non-zero velocity dispersions, both of which are neglected in TSC. In particular, the inside-out-collapse and shell-crossing of dark matter halos play an important role in generating the significant velocity dispersion. The implications of the present result are briefly discussed.
  • We reanalyse the time-variable lightcurves of the transiting planetary system PTFO 8-8695, in which a planet of 3 to 4 Jupiter mass orbits around a rapidly rotating pre-main-sequence star. Both the planetary orbital period of 0.448 days and the stellar spin period less than 0.671 days are unusually short, which makes PTFO 8-8695 an ideal system to check the model of gravity darkening and nodal precession. While the previous analysis of PTFO 8-8695 assumed that the stellar spin and planetary orbital periods are the same, we extend the analysis by discarding the spin-orbit synchronous condition, and find three different classes of solutions roughly corresponding to the nodal precession periods of 199$\pm$16, 475$\pm$21, and 827$\pm$53 days that reproduce the transit lightcurves observed in 2009 and 2010. We compare the predicted lightcurves of the three solutions against the photometry data of a few percent accuracy obtained at Koyama Astronomical Observatory in 2014 and 2015, and find that the solution with the precession period of 199$\pm$16 days is preferred even though preliminary. Future prospect and implications to other transiting systems are briefly discussed.
  • We propose a novel method to constrain the spatial extent of dust around galaxies through the measurement of dust temperature. Our method combines the dust emission of galaxies from far-infrared (FIR) image stacking analysis and the quasar reddening due to the dust absorption around galaxies. As a specific application of our method, we use the stacked FIR emission profiles of SDSS photometric galaxies over the IRAS 100$\mu$m map, and the recent measurement of the SDSS galaxy-quasar cross-correlation. If we adopt a single-temperature dust model, the resulting temperature is around 18K, which is consistent with a typical dust temperature for a central part of galaxies. If we assume an additional dust component with much lower temperature, the current data imply the temperature of the galactic dust needs to be higher, 20K to 30K. Since the model of the density and temperature distribution of dust adopted in the current paper is very simple, we cannot draw any strong conclusion at this point. Nevertheless our novel method with the elaborated theoretical model and multi-band measurement of dust will offer an interesting constraint on the statistical nature of galactic dust.
  • The most widely used Galactic extinction map (Schlegel, Finkbeiner, & Davis 1998, SFD) is constructed assuming that the observed FIR fluxes entirely come from the Galactic dust. According to the earlier suggestion by Yahata et al. (2007), we consider how far-infrared (FIR) emission of galaxies affects the SFD map. We first compute the surface number density of SDSS DR7 galaxies as a function of the $r$-band extinction, $A_{r,\rm SFD}$. We confirm that the surface densities of those galaxies positively correlate with $A_{r,\rm SFD}$ for $A_{r,\rm SFD}<0.1$, as first discovered by Yahata et al. (2007) for SDSS DR4 galaxies. Next we construct an analytic model to compute the surface density of galaxies taking account of the contamination of their FIR emission. We adopt a log-normal probability distribution for the ratio of $100\mu {\rm m}$ and $r$-band luminosities of each galaxy, $y \equiv (\nu L)_{100\mu {\rm m}}/(\nu L)_r$. Then we search for the mean and r.m.s values of $y$ that fit the observed anomaly using the analytic model. The required values to reproduce the anomaly are roughly consistent with those measured from the stacking analysis of SDSS galaxies (Kashiwagi, Yahata, & Suto 2013). Due to the limitation of our statistical modeling, we are not yet able to remove the FIR contamination of galaxies from the extinction map. Nevertheless the agreement with the model prediction suggests that the FIR emission of galaxies is mainly responsible for the observed anomaly. While the corresponding systematic error in the Galactic extinction map is 0.1 to 1mmag, it is directly correlated with galaxy clustering, and thus needs to be carefully examined in precision cosmology.
  • The angle between the stellar spin and the planetary orbit axes (spin-orbit angle) is supposed to carry valuable information on the initial condition of the planet formation and the subsequent migration history. Indeed current observations of the Rossiter- McLaughlin effect have revealed a wide range of spin-orbit misalignments for transiting exoplanets. We examine in detail the tidal evolution of a simple system comprising a Sun-like star and a hot Jupiter adopting the equilibrium tide and the inertial wave dissipation effects simultaneously. We find that the combined tidal model works as a very efficient realignment mechanism; it predicts three distinct states of the spin-orbit angle (i.e., parallel, polar, and anti-parallel orbits) for a while, but the latter two states eventually approach the parallel spin-orbit configuration. The intermediate spin-orbit angles as measured in recent observations are difficult to be achieved. Therefore the current model cannot reproduce the observed broad distribution of the spin-orbit angles, at least in its simple form. This indicates that the observed diversity of the spin-orbit angles may emerge from more complicated interactions with outer planets and/or may be the consequence of the primordial misalignment between the proto-planetary disk and the stellar spin, which requires future detailed studies.
  • The KOI-94 system is a closely-packed, multi-transiting planetary system discovered by the Kepler space telescope. It is known as the first system that exhibited a rare event called a "planet-planet eclipse (PPE)," in which two planets partially overlap with each other in their double-transit phase. In this paper, we constrain the parameters of the KOI-94 system with an analysis of the transit timing variations (TTVs). Such constraints are independent of the radial velocity (RV) analysis recently performed by Weiss and coworkers, and valuable in examining the reliability of the parameter estimate using TTVs. We numerically fit the observed TTVs of KOI-94c, KOI-94d, and KOI-94e for their masses, eccentricities, and longitudes of periastrons, and obtain the best-fit parameters including $m_{\rm c} = 9.4_{-2.1}^{+2.4} M_{\oplus}$, $m_{\rm d} = 52.1_{-7.1}^{+6.9} M_{\oplus}$, $m_{\rm e} = 13.0_{-2.1}^{+2.5} M_{\oplus}$, and $e \lesssim 0.1$ for all the three planets. While these values are mostly in agreement with the RV result, the mass of KOI-94d estimated from the TTV is significantly smaller than the RV value $m_{\rm d} = 106 \pm 11 M_{\oplus}$. In addition, we find that the TTV of the outermost planet KOI-94e is not well reproduced in the current modeling. We also present analytic modeling of the PPE and derive a simple formula to reconstruct the mutual inclination of the two planets from the observed height, central time, and duration of the brightening caused by the PPE. Based on this model, the implication of the results of TTV analysis for the time of the next PPE is discussed.
  • The Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is a massively-multiplexed fiber-fed optical and near-infrared 3-arm spectrograph (N_fiber=2400, 380<lambda<1260nm, 1.3 degree diameter FoV), offering unique opportunities in survey astronomy. Here we summarize the science case feasible for a survey of Subaru 300 nights. We describe plans to constrain the nature of dark energy via a survey of emission line galaxies spanning a comoving volume of 9.3 (Gpc/h)^3 in the redshift range 0.8<z<2.4. In each of 6 redshift bins, the cosmological distances will be measured to 3% precision via BAO, and redshift-space distortions will be used to constrain structure growth to 6% precision. In the GA program, radial velocities and chemical abundances of stars in the Milky Way and M31 will be used to infer the past assembly histories of spiral galaxies and the structure of their dark matter halos. Data will be secured for 10^6 stars in the Galactic thick-disk, halo and tidal streams as faint as V~22, including stars with V < 20 to complement the goals of the Gaia mission. A medium-resolution mode with R = 5000 to be implemented in the red arm will allow the measurement of multiple alpha-element abundances and more precise velocities for Galactic stars, elucidating the detailed chemo-dynamical structure and evolution of each of the main stellar components of the Milky Way Galaxy and of its dwarf spheroidal galaxies. For the extragalactic program, our simulations suggest the wide avelength range will be powerful in probing the galaxy population and its clustering over a wide redshift range. We propose to conduct a color-selected survey of 1<z<2 galaxies and AGN over 16 deg^2 to J~23.4, yielding a fair sample of galaxies with stellar masses above ~10^{10}Ms at z~2. A two-tiered survey of higher redshift LBGs and LAEs will quantify the properties of early systems close to the reionization epoch.
  • We examine the validity of the hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE) assumption for galaxy clusters using one of the highest-resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. We define and evaluate several effective mass terms corresponding to the Euler equations of the gas dynamics, and quantify the degree of the validity of HSE in terms of the mass estimate. We find that the mass estimated under the HSE assumption (the HSE mass) deviates from the true mass by up to ~ 30 %. This level of departure from HSE is consistent with the previous claims, but our physical interpretation is rather different. We demonstrate that the inertial term in the Euler equations makes a negligible contribution to the total mass, and the overall gravity of the cluster is balanced by the thermal gas pressure gradient and the gas acceleration term. Indeed the deviation from the HSE mass is well explained by the acceleration term at almost all radii. We also clarify the confusion of previous work due to the inappropriate application of the Jeans equations in considering the validity of HSE from the gas dynamics extracted from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations.
  • We study the variability of major atmospheric absorption features in the disk-integrated spectra of the Earth with future application to Earth-analogs in mind, concentrating on the diurnal timescale. We first analyze observations of the Earth provided by the EPOXI mission, and find 5-20% fractional variation of the absorption depths of H2O and O2 bands, two molecules that have major signatures in the observed range. From a correlation analysis with the cloud map data from the Earth Observing Satellite (EOS), we find that their variation pattern is primarily due to the uneven cloud cover distribution. In order to account for the observed variation quantitatively, we consider a simple opaque cloud model, which assumes that the clouds totally block the spectral influence of the atmosphere below the cloud layer, equivalent to assuming that the incident light is completely scattered at the cloud top level. The model is reasonably successful, and reproduces the EPOXI data from the pixel-level EOS cloud/water vapor data. A difference in the diurnal variability patterns of H2O and O2 bands is ascribed to the differing vertical and horizontal distribution of those molecular species in the atmosphere. On the Earth, the inhomogeneous distribution of atmospheric water vapor is due to the existence of its exchange with liquid and solid phases of H2O on the planet's surface on a timescale short compared to atmospheric mixing times. If such differences in variability patterns were detected in spectra of Earth-analogs, it would provide the information on the inhomogeneous composition of their atmospheres.
  • We have performed stacking image analyses of galaxies over the Galactic extinction map constructed by Schlegel, Finkbeiner & Davis (1998). We select ~10^7 galaxies in total from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 photometric catalog. We detect clear signatures of the enhancement of the extinction in r-band, $\Delta A_r$, around galaxies, indicating that the extinction map is contaminated by their FIR (far infrared) emission. The average amplitude of the contamination per galaxy is well fitted to $\Delta A_r(m_r) = 0.64 \times 10^{0.17(18-m_r)}$ [mmag]. While this value is very small, it is directly associated with galaxies and may have a systematic effect on galaxy statistics. Indeed this correlated contamination leads to a relatively large anomaly of galaxy surface number densities against the SFD extinction A_SFD discovered by Yahata et al. (2007). We model the radial profiles of stacked galaxy images, and find that the FIR signal around each galaxy does not originate from the central galaxy alone, but is dominated by the contributions of nearby galaxies via galaxy angular clustering. The separation of the single galaxy and the clustering terms enables us to infer the statistical relation of the FIR and r-band fluxes of galaxies and also to probe the flux-weighted cross-correlation of galaxies, down to the magnitudes that are difficult to probe directly for individual objects. We repeat the same stacking analysis for SDSS DR6 photometric quasars and discovered the similar signatures but with weaker amplitudes. The implications of the present results for galaxy and quasar statistics and for correction to the Galactic extinction map are briefly discussed.
  • We report a joint analysis of the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect with Subaru and the Kepler photometry for Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) 94 system. The system comprises four transiting planet candidates with orbital periods of 22.3 (KOI-94.01), 10.4 (KOI-94.02), 54.3 (KOI-94.03), and 3.7 (KOI-94.04) days from the Kepler photometry. We performed the radial velocity (RV) measurement of the system with the Subaru 8.2 m telescope on August 10, 2012 (UT), covering a complete transit of KOI-94.01 for $\sim 6.7$ hours. The resulting RV variation due to the RM effect spectroscopically confirms that KOI-94.01 is indeed the transiting planet, and implies that its orbital axis is well aligned with the stellar spin axis; the projected spin-orbit angle $\lambda$ is estimated as $-6_{-11}^{+13}$ deg. This is the first measurement of the RM effect for a multiple transiting system. Remarkably, the archived Kepler lightcurve around BJD=2455211.5 (date in UT January 14/15, 2010) indicates a "ouble transit" event of KOI-94.01 and KOI-94.03, in which the two planets transit the stellar disk simultaneously. Moreover, the two planets partially overlap each other, and exhibit a "planet-planet eclipse" around the transit center. This provides a rare opportunity to put tight constraints on the configuration of the two transiting planets by joint analysis with our Subaru RM measurement. Indeed, we find that the projected mutual inclination of KOI-94.01 and KOI-94.03 is estimated to be $\delta = -1.15 \pm 0.55$ deg. Implications for the migration model of multiple planet systems are also discussed.
  • We present an investigation of spin-orbit angles for planetary system candidates reported by Kepler. By combining the rotational period $P_s$ inferred from the flux variation due to starspots and the projected rotational velocity $V\sin I_s$ and stellar radius obtained by a high resolution spectroscopy, we attempt to estimate the inclination $I_s$ of the stellar spin axis with respect to the line-of-sight. For transiting planetary systems, in which planetary orbits are edge-on seen from us, the stellar inclination $I_s$ can be a useful indicator of a spin-orbit alignment/misalignment. We newly conducted spectroscopic observations with Subaru/HDS for 15 KOI systems, whose lightcurves show periodic flux variations. After detailed analyses of their lightcurves and spectra, it turned out that some of them are binaries, or the flux variations are too coherent to be caused by starspots, probably representing ellipsoidal variations, and consequently we could constrain stellar inclinations $I_s$ for eight systems. Among them, KOI-262 and 280 are in good agreement with $I_s=90^\circ$ suggesting a spin-orbit alignment, while at least one system, KOI-261, shows a possible spin-orbit misalignment. We also obtain a small $I_s$ for KOI-1463, but the transiting companion seems to be a star rather than a planet. The results for KOI-257, 269, 367, and 974 are ambiguous, and can be explained with either misalignments or moderate differential rotation. Since our method can be applied to any system having starspots regardless of the planet size, future observations will allow for the expansion of the parameter space in which the spin-orbit relations are investigated.
  • We report on observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect for the XO-3 exoplanetary system. The RM effect for the system was previously measured by two different groups, but their results were statistically inconsistent. To obtain a decisive result we observed two full transits of XO-3b with the Subaru 8.2-m telescope. By modeling these data with a new and more accurate analytic formula for the RM effect, we find the projected spin-orbit angle to be \lambda=37.3 deg \pm 3.0 deg, in good agreement with the previous finding by Winn et al. (2009). In addition, an offset of ~22 m/s was observed between the two transit datasets. This offset could be a signal of a third body in the XO-3 system, a possibility that should be checked with future observations. We also attempt to search for a possible signature of the stellar differential rotation in the RM data for the first time, and put weak upper limits on the differential rotation parameters.
  • We present an improved formula for the anomalous radial velocity of the star during planetary transits due to the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect. The improvement comes from a more realistic description of the stellar absorption line profiles, taking into account stellar rotation, macroturbulence, thermal broadening, pressure broadening, and instrumental broadening. Although the formula is derived for the case in which radial velocities are measured by cross-correlation, we show through numerical simulations that the formula accurately describes the cases where the radial velocities are measured with the iodine absorption-cell technique. The formula relies on prior knowledge of the parameters describing macroturbulence, instrumental broadening and other broadening mechanisms, but even 30% errors in those parameters do not significantly change the results in typical circumstances. We show that the new analytic formula agrees with previous ones that had been computed on a case-by-case basis via numerical simulations. Finally, as one application of the new formula, we reassess the impact of the differential rotation on the RM velocity anomaly. We show that differential rotation of a rapidly rotating star may have a significant impact on future RM observations.