• Here we report the observation of pressure-induced melting of antiferromagnetic (AFM) order and emergence of a new quantum state in the honeycomb-lattice halide alpha-RuCl3, a candidate compound in the proximity of quantum spin liquid state. Our high-pressure heat capacity measurements demonstrate that the AFM order smoothly melts away at a critical pressure (Pc) of 0.7 GPa. Intriguingly, the AFM transition temperature displays an increase upon applying pressure below the Pc, in stark contrast to usual phase diagrams, for example in pressurized parent compounds of unconventional superconductors. Furthermore, in the high-pressure phase an unusual steady of magnetoresistance is observed. These observations suggest that the high-pressure phase is in an exotic gapped quantum state which is robust against pressure up to ~140 GPa.
  • We report the observation of extraordinarily robust zero-resistance superconductivity in the pressurized (TaNb)0.67(HfZrTi)0.33 high entropy alloy - a new kind of material with a body-centered cubic crystal structure made from five randomly distributed transition metal elements. The transition to superconductivity (TC) increases from an initial temperature of 7.7 K at ambient pressure to 10 K at ~ 60 GPa, and then slowly decreases to 9 K by 190.6 GPa, a pressure that falls within that of the outer core of the earth. We infer that the continuous existence of the zero-resistance superconductivity from one atmosphere up to such a high pressure requires a special combination of electronic and mechanical characteristics. This high entropy alloy superconductor thus may have a bright future for applications under extreme conditions, and also poses a challenge for understanding the underlying quantum physics.
  • We report the discovery of superconductivity in pressurized CeRhGe3, until now the only remaining non-superconducting member of the isostructural family of non-centrosymmetric heavy-fermion compounds CeTX3 (T = Co, Rh, Ir and X = Si, Ge). Superconductivity appears in CeRhGe3 at a pressure of 19.6 GPa and the transition temperature Tc reaches a maximum value of 1.3 K at 21.5 GPa. This finding provides an opportunity to establish systematic correlations between superconductivity and materials properties within this family. Though ambient-pressure unit-cell volumes and critical pressures for superconductivity vary substantially across the series, all family members reach a maximum Tcmax at a common critical cell volume Vcrit, and Tcmax at Vcrit increases with increasing spin-orbit coupling strength of the d-electrons. These correlations show that substantial Kondo hybridization and spin-orbit coupling favor superconductivity in this family, the latter reflecting the role of broken centro-symmetry.
  • In layered transition metal dichalcogenides (LTMDCs) that display both charge density waves (CDWs) and superconductivity, the superconducting state generally emerges directly on suppression of the CDW state. Here, however, we report a different observation for pressurized TaTe2, a non-superconducting CDW-bearing LTMDC at ambient pressure. We find that a superconducting state does not occur in TaTe2 after the full suppression of its CDW state, which we observe at about 3 GPa, but, rather, a non-superconducting semimetal state is observed. At a higher pressure, ~21 GPa, where both the semimetal state and the corresponding positive magnetoresistance effect are destroyed, superconductivity finally emerges and remains present up to ~50 GPa, the high pressure limit of our measurements. Our pressure-temperature phase diagram for TaTe2 demonstrates that the CDW and the superconducting phases in TaTe2 do not directly transform one to the other, but rather are separated by a semimetal state, - the first experimental case where the CDW and superconducting states are separated by an intermediate phase in LTMDC systems.
  • We report high pressure studies of the structural stability of Ru2Sn3, a new type of three dimensional topological insulator (3D-TI) with unique quasi-one dimensional Dirac electron states throughout the surface Brillouin zone of its one-atmosphere low temperature orthorhombic form. Our in-situ high-pressure synchrotron x-ray diffraction and electrical resistance measurements reveal that upon increasing pressure the tetragonal to orthorhombic shifts to higher temperature. We find that the stability of the orthorhombic phase that hosts the non-trivial topological ground state can be pushed up to room temperature by an applied pressure of ~ 20 GPa. This is in contrast to the commonly known 3D-TIs whose ground state is usually destroyed under pressure. Our results indicate that pressure provides a possible pathway for realizing a room-temperature topological insulating state in Ru2Sn3.
  • One of the most strikingly universal features of the high temperature superconductors is that the superconducting phase emerges in the close proximity of the antiferromagnetic phase, and the interplay between these two phases poses a long standing challenge. It is commonly believed that,as the antiferromagnetic transition temperature is continuously suppressed to zero, there appears a quantum critical point, around which the existence of antiferromagnetic fluctuation is responsible for the development of the superconductivity. In contrast to this scenario, we report the discovery of a bi-critical point identified at 2.88 GPa and 26.02 K in the pressurized high quality single crystal Ca0.73La0.27FeAs2 by complementary in situ high pressure measurements. At the critical pressure, we find that the antiferromagnetism suddenly disappears and superconductivity simultaneously emerges at almost the same temperature, and that the external magnetic field suppresses the superconducting transition temperature but hardly affects the antiferromagnetic transition temperature.
  • The influence of carrier type on superconductivity has been an important issue for understanding both conventional and unconventional superconductors [1-7]. For elements that superconduct, it is known that hole-carriers govern the superconductivity for transition and main group metals [8-10]. The role of hole-carriers in elements that are not normally conducting but can be converted to superconductors, however, remains unclear due to the lack of experimental data. Here we report the first in-situ high pressure Hall effect measurements on single crystal black phosphorus, measured up to ~ 50 GPa, and find a correlation between the Hall coefficient and the superconducting transition temperature (TC). Our results reveal that hole-carriers play a vital role in developing superconductivity and enhancing TC. Importantly, we also find a Lifshitz transition in the high-pressure cubic phase at ~17.2GPa, which uncovers the origin of a puzzling valley in the superconducting TC-pressure phase diagram. These results offer insight into the role of hole-carriers in developing superconductivity in simple semiconducting solids under pressure.
  • Non-centrosymmetric superconductors, whose crystal structure is absent of inversion symmetry, have recently received special attentions due to the expectation of unconventional pairings and exotic physics associated with such pairings. The newly discovered superconductors A2Cr3As3 (A=K, Rb), featured by the quasi-one dimensional structure with conducting CrAs chains, belongs to such kind of superconductor. In this study, we are the first to report the finding that the superconductivity of A2Cr3As3 (A=K, Rb) has a positive correlation with the extent of non-centrosymmetry. Our in-situ high pressure ac susceptibility and synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements reveal that the larger bond angle of As-Cr-As in the CrAs chains can be taken as a key factor controlling superconductivity. While the smaller bond angle and the distance between the CrAs chains also affect the superconductivity due to their structural connections with the angle. We find that the larger value of the difference between the larger and samller angles, which is associated with the extent of the non-centrosymmetry of the lattice structure, is in favor of superconductivity. These results are expected to shed a new light on the underlying mechanism of the superconductivity in these Q1D superconductors and also to provide new perspective in understanding other non-centrosymmetric superconductors.
  • SmB6 is a promising candidate material that promises to elucidate the connection between strong correlations and topological electronic states, which is a major challenge in condensed matter physics. The electron correlations are responsible for the development of multiple gaps in SmB6, whose elucidation is sorely needed. Here we do so by studying the evolutions of the gaps and other corresponding behaviors under pressure. Our measurements of the valence, Hall effect and electrical resistivity clearly identify the gap which is associated with the bulk Kondo hybridization and, moreover, uncover a pressure-induced quantum phase transition from the putative topological Kondo insulating state to a Fermi-liquid state at ~4 GPa. We provide the evidences for the transition by a jump of inverse Hall coefficient, a diverging tendency of the electron-electron scattering coefficient and, thereby, a destruction of the Kondo entanglement in the ground state. These effects take place in a mixed-valence background. Our results raise the new prospect for studying topological electronic states in quantum critical materials settings.
  • In-situ hydrostatic and uniaxial high pressure studies were performed on recently discovered CrAs-based qausi-one-dimensional superconductors A2Cr3As3 (A=K and Rb). The established Pressure-Temperature phase diagram in this study clearly demonstrates that either hydrostatic pressure or uniaxial pressure globally suppresses the superconducting transition temperature (Tc), and the latter is more effective than the former. Interestingly, in the same hydrostatic pressure environment, the suppressing rate of Tc in Rb2Cr3As3 is nearly twice as that of K2Cr3As3. Significantly, the reduced Tc in these superconductors can fully recover to its ambient-pressure value after the applied pressure is entirely released. Our results suggest that the bonding distance and angle between Cr-Cr in the Cr3As3 chains are the key factor in determining Tc and that the optimal lattice for superconductivity is hosted in the pristine K2Cr3As3.
  • Topological insulators (TIs) containing 4f electrons have recently attracted intensive interests due to the possible interplay of their non-trivial topological properties and strong electronic correlations. YbB6 and SmB6 are the prototypical systems with such unusual properties, which may be tuned by external pressure to give rise to new emergent phenomena. Here, we report the first observation, through in-situ high pressure resistance, Hall, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption measurements, of two pressure-induced quantum phase transitions (QPTs) in YbB6. Our data revealthat the two insulating phases are separated by a metallic phase due to the pressure-driven valence change of Yb f-orbitals. In combination with previous studies, our results suggest that the two insulating states may be topologically different in nature and originate from the d-p and d-f hybridization, respectively. The tunable topological properties of YbB6 revealed in this study may shed light on the intriguing correlation between the topology and the 4f electrons from the perspective of pressure dependent studies.
  • We report the first observation of a pressure-induced breakdown of the 3D-DSM state in Cd3As2, evidenced by a series of in-situ high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and single crystal transport measurements. We find that Cd3As2 undergoes a structural phase transition from a metallic tetragonal (T) phase in space group I41/acd to a semiconducting monoclinic (M) phase in space group P21/c at critical pressure 2.57 GPa, above this pressure, an activation energy gap appears, accompanied by distinct switches in Hall resistivity slope and electron mobility. These changes of crystal symmetry and corresponding transport properties manifest the breakdown of the 3D-DSM state in pressurized Cd3As2.
  • The recent discovery of large and non-saturating magnetoresistance (LMR) in WTe2 provides a unique playground to find new phenomena and significant perspective for potential applications. Here we report the first observation of superconductivity near the proximity of suppressed LMR state in pressurized WTe2 through high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction, electrical resistance, magnetoresistance, and ac magnetic susceptibility measurements. It is found that the positive magnetoresistance effect can be turned off at a critical pressure of 10.5 GPa without crystal structure change and superconductivity emerges simultaneously. The maximum superconducting transition temperature can be reached to 6.5 K at ~15 GPa and it decreases down to 2.6 K at ~25 GPa. In-situ high pressure Hall coefficient measurements at 10 K demonstrate that elevating pressure decreases hole carrier's population but increases electron carrier's population. Significantly, at the critical pressure, we observed a sign change in the Hall coefficient, indicating a possible Lifshitz-type quantum phase transition in WTe2.
  • A unique platform for investigating the correlation between the antiferromagnetic (AFM) and superconducting (SC) states in high temperature superconductors is created by the discovery of alkaline iron selenide superconductors which are composed of an AFM insulating phase and a SC phase separated spatially. Our previous studies showed that pressure can fully suppress the superconductivity of ambient-pressure superconducting phase (SC-I) and AFM order simultaneously, then induce another superconducting phase (SC-II) at higher pressure. Consequently, the connection between the two superconducting phases becomes an intriguing issue. In this study, on the basis of observing pressure-induced reemergence of superconductivity in Rb0.8Fe2-ySe2-xTex (x=0, 0.19 and 0.28) superconductors, we find that the superconductivity of the SC-I and SC-II phases as well as the AFM ordered state can be synchronously tuned by Te doping and disappear together at the doping level of x=0.4. We propose that the two superconducting phases are connected by the AFM phase, in other words, the state of long-ranged AFM order plays a role in giving rise to superconductivity of the SC-I phase, while the fluctuation state of the suppressed AFM phase drives the emergence of SC-II phase. These results comprehensively demonstrate the versatile roles of AFM states in stabilizing and developing superconductivity in the alkaline iron selenide superconductors.
  • Here, we report that K-doped BaMn2Bi2 shows no experimental evidence of superconductivity down to 1.5 K under pressures up to 35.6 GPa, however, a tetragonal to an orthorhombic phase transition is observed at pressure of 20 GPa. Theoretical calculations for the tetragonal and orthorhombic phases, on basis of our high-pressure XRD data, find that the AFM order is robust in both of the phases in pressurized Ba0.61K0.39Mn2Bi2. Our experimental and theoretical results suggest that the K-doped BaMn2Bi2 belongs to a strong Hunds AFM metal with a hybridization of localized spin electrons and itinerant electrons, and that its robust AFM order essentially prevents the emergence of superconductivity.