• The stochastic gradient descent (SGD) algorithm has been widely used in statistical estimation for large-scale data due to its computational and memory efficiency. While most existing works focus on the convergence of the objective function or the error of the obtained solution, we investigate the problem of statistical inference of true model parameters based on SGD when the population loss function is strongly convex and satisfies certain smoothness conditions. Our main contributions are two-fold. First, in the fixed dimension setup, we propose two consistent estimators of the asymptotic covariance of the average iterate from SGD: (1) a plug-in estimator, and (2) a batch-means estimator, which is computationally more efficient and only uses the iterates from SGD. Both proposed estimators allow us to construct asymptotically exact confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. Second, for high-dimensional linear regression, using a variant of the SGD algorithm, we construct a debiased estimator of each regression coefficient that is asymptotically normal. This gives a one-pass algorithm for computing both the sparse regression coefficients and confidence intervals, which is computationally attractive and applicable to online data.
  • Grid supportive (GS) modes integrated within distributed energy resources (DERs) can improve the frequency response. However, synthesis of GS modes for guaranteed performance is challenging. Moreover, a tool is needed to handle sophisticated specifications from grid codes and protection relays. This paper proposes a model predictive control (MPC)-based mode synthesis methodology, which can accommodate the temporal logic specifications (TLSs). The TLSs allow richer descriptions of control specifications addressing both magnitude and time at the same time. The proposed controller will compute a series of Boolean control signals to synthesize the GS mode of DERs by solving the MPC problem under the normal condition, where the frequency response predicted by a reduced-order model satisfies the defined specifications. Once a sizable disturbance is detected, the pre-calculated signals are applied to the DERs. The proposed synthesis methodology is verified on the full nonlinear model in Simulink. A robust factor is imposed on the specifications to compensate the response mismatch between the reduce-order model and nonlinear model so that the nonlinear response satisfies the required TLS.
  • Chemical diversity of the gas in low-mass protostellar cores is widely recognized. In order to explore its origin, a survey of chemical composition toward 36 Class 0/I protostars in the Perseus molecular cloud complex, which are selected in an unbiased way under certain physical conditions, has been conducted with IRAM 30 m and NRO 45 m telescope. Multiple lines of C2H, c-C3H2 and CH3OH have been observed to characterize the chemical composition averaged over a 1000 au scale around the protostar. The derived beam-averaged column densities show significant chemical diversity among the sources, where the column density ratios of C2H/CH3OH are spread out by 2 orders of magnitude. From previous studies, the hot corino sources have abundant CH3OH but deficient C2H, their C2H/CH3OH column density ratios being relatively low. In contrast, the warm-carbon-chain chemistry (WCCC) sources are found to reveal the high C2H/CH3OH column density ratios. We find that the majority of the sources have intermediate characters between these two distinct chemistry types. A possible trend is seen between the C2H/CH3OH ratio and the distance of the source from the edge of a molecular cloud. The sources located near cloud edges or in isolated clouds tend to have a high C2H/CH3OH ratio. On the other hand, the sources having a low C2H/CH3OH ratio tend to be located in inner regions of the molecular cloud complex. This result gives an important clue to an understanding of the origin of the chemical diversity of protostellar cores in terms of environmental effects.
  • Frequency performance has been a crucial issue for islanded microgrids. On the one hand, most distributed energy resources (DER) are converter-interfaced and do not inherently respond to frequency variations. On the other hand, current inertia emulation approach cannot provide guaranteed response. In this paper, a model reference control based inertia emulation strategy is proposed for diesel-wind systems. Desired inertia can be precisely emulated through the proposed strategy. A typical frequency response model with parametric inertia is set to be the reference model. A measurement at a specific location delivers the information about the disturbance acting on the diesel-wind system to the reference model. The objective is for the speed of the diesel generator to track the reference so that the desired inertial response is realized. In addition, polytopic parameter uncertainty will be considered. The control strategy is configured in different ways according to different operating points. The parameters of the reference model are scheduled to ensure adequate frequency response under a pre-defined worst case. The controller is implemented in a nonlinear three-phase diesel-wind system fed microgrid using the Simulink software platform. The results show that exact synthetic inertia can be emulated and adequate frequency response is achieved.
  • We conduct a theoretical study of the formation of massive stars over a wide range of metallicities from 1e-5 to 1Zsun and evaluate the star formation efficiencies (SFEs) from prestellar cloud cores taking into account multiple feedback processes. Unlike for simple spherical accretion, in the case of disk accretion feedback processes do not set upper limits on stellar masses. At solar metallicity, launching of magneto-centrifugally-driven outflows is the dominant feedback process to set SFEs, while radiation pressure, which has been regarded to be pivotal, has only minor contribution even in the formation of over-100Msun stars. Photoevaporation becomes significant in over-20Msun star formation at low metallicities of <1e-2Zsun, where dust absorption of ionizing photons is inefficient. We conclude that if initial prestellar core properties are similar, then massive stars are rarer in extremely metal-poor environments of 1e-5 - 1e-3Zsun. Our results give new insight into the high-mass end of the initial mass function and its potential variation with galactic and cosmological environments.
  • The shot-noise unit (SNU) is a crucial factor for the practical security of a continuous-variable quantum key distribution system. In the most widely used experimental scheme, the SNU should be calibrated first and acts as a constant during key distribution. However, the practical SNU could be controlled by the eavesdropper, which will differ from the calibrated one. It could open loopholes for the eavesdropper to intercept the secret key. In this paper, we report a quantum hacking method to control the practical SNU by using the limited compensation rate in the polarization compensation phase. Since the compensation is only based on of the polarization measurement results of part of local oscillator pulses, the other unmeasured pulses will leave a loophole for eavesdroppers to control the practical SUN. The simulation and experiment results indicate that the practical SNU can be controlled by the eavesdropper. Thus, the eavesdropper can use the fact that, the practical SNU is no longer equals to the calibrated one to control the excess noise and final key rate.
  • Inadequate frequency response can arise due to a high penetration of wind turbine generators (WTGs) and requires a frequency support function to be integrated in the WTG. The appropriate design for these controllers to ensure adequate response has not been investigated thoroughly. In this paper, a safety supervisory control (SSC) is proposed to synthesize the supportive modes in WTGs to guarantee performance. The concept, region of safety (ROS), is stated for safe switching synthesis. An optimization formula is proposed to calculate the largest ROS. By assuming a polynomial structure, the problem can be solved by a sum of squares program. A feasible result will generate a polynomial, the zero sublevel set of which represents the ROS and is employed as the safety supervisor. A decentralized communication architecture is proposed for small-scale systems. Moreover, a scheduling loop is suggested so that the supervisor updates its boundary with respect to the renewable penetration level to be robust with respect to variations in system inertia. The proposed controller is first verified on a single-machine three-phase nonlinear microgrid, and then implemented on the IEEE 39-bus system. Both results indicate that the proposed framework and control configuration can guarantee adequate response without excessive conservativeness.
  • Generation portfolio can be significantly altered due to the deployment of distributed energy resources (DER) in distribution networks and the concept of microgrid. Generally, distribution networks can operate in a more resilient and economic fashion through proper coordination of DER. However, due to the partially uncontrollable and stochastic nature of some DER, the variance of net load of distribution systems increases, which raises the operational cost and complicates operation for transmission companies. This motivates peak shaving and valley filling using energy storage units deployed in distribution systems. This paper aims at theoretical formulation of optimal load variance minimization, where the infinity norm of net load is minimized. Then, the problem is reformulated equivalently as a linear program. A case study is performed with capacity-limited battery energy storage model and the simplified power flow model of a radial distribution network. The influence of capacity limit and deployment location are studied.
  • Converter-interfaced power sources (CIPS) are hybrid control systems as they may switch between multiple operating modes. Due to increasing penetration, the hybrid behavior of CIPS, such as, wind turbine generators (WTG), may have significant impact on power system dynamics. In this paper, the frequency dynamics under inertia emulation and primary support from WTG is studied. A mode switching for WTG to ensure adequate frequency response is proposed. The switching instants are determined by our proposed concept of a region of safety (ROS), which is the initial set of safe trajectories. The barrier certificate methodology is employed to derive a new algorithm to obtain and enlarge the ROS for the given desired safe limits and the worst-case disturbance scenarios. Then critical switching instants and a safe recovery procedure are found. In addition, the emulated inertia and load-damping effect is derived in the time frame of inertia and primary frequency response, respectively. The theoretical results under critical cases are consistent with simulations and can be used as guidance for practical control design.
  • In this paper, a model reference control based inertia emulation strategy is proposed. Desired inertia can be precisely emulated through this control strategy so that guaranteed performance is ensured. A typical frequency response model with parametrical inertia is set to be the reference model. A measurement at a specific location delivers the information of disturbance acting on the diesel-wind system to the reference model. The objective is for the speed of the diesel-wind system to track the reference model. Since active power variation is dominantly governed by mechanical dynamics and modes, only mechanical dynamics and states, i.e., a swing-engine-governor system plus a reduced-order wind turbine generator, are involved in the feedback control design. The controller is implemented in a three-phase diesel-wind system feed microgrid. The results show exact synthetic inertia is emulated, leading to guaranteed performance and safety bounds.
  • As a fundamental phenomenon in nature, randomness has a wide range of applications in the fields of science and engineering. Among different types of random number generators (RNG), quantum random number generator (QRNG) is a kind of promising RNG as it can provide provable true random numbers based on the inherent randomness of fundamental quantum processes. Nevertheless, the randomness from a QRNG can be diminished (or even destroyed) if the devices (especially the entropy source devices) are not perfect or ill-characterized. To eliminate the practical security loopholes from the source, source-independent QRNGs, which allow the source to have arbitrary and unknown dimensions, have been introduced and become one of the most important semi-device-independent QRNGs. Herein a method that enables ultra-fast unpredictable quantum random number generation from quadrature fluctuations of quantum optical field without any assumptions on the input states is proposed. Particularly, to estimate a lower bound on the extractable randomness that is independent from side information held by an eavesdropper, a new security analysis framework is established based on the extremality of Gaussian states, which can be easily extended to design and analyze new semi-device-independent continuous variable QRNG protocols. Moreover, the practical imperfections of the QRNG including the effects of excess noise, finite sampling range, finite resolution and asymmetric conjugate quadratures are taken into account and quantitatively analyzed. Finally, the proposed method is experimentally demonstrated to obtain high secure random number generation rates of 15.07 Gbits/s in off-line configuration and can potentially achieve 6 Gbits/s by real-time post-processing.
  • We present an overview and first results of the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy Massive (SOMA) Star Formation Survey, which is using the FORCAST instrument to image massive protostars from $\sim10$--$40\:\rm{\mu}\rm{m}$. These wavelengths trace thermal emission from warm dust, which in Core Accretion models mainly emerges from the inner regions of protostellar outflow cavities. Dust in dense core envelopes also imprints characteristic extinction patterns at these wavelengths, causing intensity peaks to shift along the outflow axis and profiles to become more symmetric at longer wavelengths. We present observational results for the first eight protostars in the survey, i.e., multiwavelength images, including some ancillary ground-based MIR observations and archival {\it{Spitzer}} and {\it{Herschel}} data. These images generally show extended MIR/FIR emission along directions consistent with those of known outflows and with shorter wavelength peak flux positions displaced from the protostar along the blueshifted, near-facing sides, thus confirming qualitative predictions of Core Accretion models. We then compile spectral energy distributions and use these to derive protostellar properties by fitting theoretical radiative transfer models. Zhang and Tan models, based on the Turbulent Core Model of McKee and Tan, imply the sources have protostellar masses $m_*\sim10$--50$\:M_\odot$ accreting at $\sim10^{-4}$--$10^{-3}\:M_\odot\:{\rm{yr}}^{-1}$ inside cores of initial masses $M_c\sim30$--500$\:M_\odot$ embedded in clumps with mass surface densities $\Sigma_{\rm{cl}}\sim0.1$--3$\:{\rm{g\:cm}^{-2}}$. Fitting Robitaille et al. models typically leads to slightly higher protostellar masses, but with disk accretion rates $\sim100\times$ smaller. We discuss reasons for these differences and overall implications of these first survey results for massive star formation theories.
  • We study feedback during massive star formation using semi-analytic methods, considering the effects of disk winds, radiation pressure, photoevaporation and stellar winds, while following protostellar evolution in collapsing massive gas cores. We find that disk winds are the dominant feedback mechanism setting star formation efficiencies (SFEs) from initial cores of ~0.3-0.5. However, radiation pressure is also significant to widen the outflow cavity causing reductions of SFE compared to the disk-wind only case, especially for >100Msun star formation at clump mass surface densities Sigma<0.3g/cm2. Photoevaporation is of relatively minor importance due to dust attenuation of ionizing photons. Stellar winds have even smaller effects during the accretion stage. For core masses Mc~10-1000Msun and Sigma~0.1-3g/cm2, we find the overall SFE to be 0.31(Rc/0.1pc)^{-0.39}, potentially a useful sub-grid star-formation model in simulations that can resolve pre-stellar core radii, Rc=0.057(Mc/60Msun)^{1/2}(Sigma/g/cm2)^{-1/2}pc. The decline of SFE with Mc is gradual with no evidence for a maximum stellar-mass set by feedback processes up to stellar masses of ~300Msun. We thus conclude that the observed truncation of the high-mass end of the IMF is shaped mostly by the pre-stellar core mass function or internal stellar processes. To form massive stars with the observed maximum masses of ~150-300Msun, initial core masses need to be >500-1000Msun. We also apply our feedback model to zero-metallicity primordial star formation, showing that, in the absence of dust, photoevaporation staunches accretion at ~50Msun. Our model implies radiative feedback is most significant at metallicities ~10^{-2}Zsun, since both radiation pressure and photoevaporation are effective in this regime.
  • Converter-interfaced power sources (CIPSs), like wind turbine and energy storage, can be switched to the inertia emulation mode when the detected frequency deviation exceeds a pre-designed threshold, i.e. dead band, to support the frequency response of a power grid. This letter proposes an approach to derive the emulated inertia and damping from a CIPS based on the linearized model of the CIPS and the power grid, where the grid is represented by an equivalent single machine. The emulated inertia and damping can be explicitly expressed in time and turn out to be time-dependent.
  • As part of an ALMA survey to study the origin of episodic accretion in young eruptive variables, we have observed the circumstellar environment of the star V2775 Ori. This object is a very young, pre-main sequence object which displays a large amplitude outburst characteristic of the FUor class. We present Cycle-2 band 6 observations of V2775 Ori with a continuum and CO (2-1) isotopologue resolution of 0.25\as (103 au). We report the detection of a marginally resolved circumstellar disc in the ALMA continuum with an integrated flux of $106 \pm 2$ mJy, characteristic radius of $\sim$ 30 au, inclination of $14.0^{+7.8}_{-14.5}$ deg, and is oriented nearly face-on with respect to the plane of the sky. The \co~emission is separated into distinct blue and red-shifted regions that appear to be rings or shells of expanding material from quasi-episodic outbursts. The system is oriented in such a way that the disc is seen through the outflow remnant of V2775 Ori, which has an axis along our line-of-sight. The $^{13}$CO emission displays similar structure to that of the \co, while the C$^{18}$O line emission is very weak. We calculated the expansion velocities of the low- and medium-density material with respect to the disc to be of -2.85 km s$^{-1}$ (blue), 4.4 km s$^{-1}$ (red) and -1.35 and 1.15 km s$^{-1}$ (for blue and red) and we derived the mass, momentum and kinetic energy of the expanding gas. The outflow has an hourglass shape where the cavities are not seen. We interpret the shapes that the gas traces as cavities excavated by an ancient outflow. We report a detection of line emission from the circumstellar disc and derive a lower limit of the gas mass of 3 \MJup.
  • We present ALMA Cycle 1 observations of the HH46/47 molecular outflow using combined 12m array and ACA observations. The improved angular resolution and sensitivity of our multi-line maps reveal structures that help us study the entrainment process in much more detail and allow us to obtain more precise estimates of outflow properties than previous observations. We use 13CO(1-0) and C18O(1-0) emission to correct for the 12CO(1-0) optical depth to accurately estimate the outflow mass, momentum and kinetic energy. This correction increases the estimates of the mass, momentum and kinetic energy by factors of about 9, 5 and 2, respectively, with respect to estimates assuming optically thin emission. The new 13CO and C18O data also allow us to trace denser and slower outflow material than that traced by the 12CO maps, and they reveal an outflow cavity wall at very low velocities (as low as 0.2km/s with respect to the cores central velocity). Adding with the slower material traced only by 13CO and C18O, there is another factor of 3 increase in the mass estimate and 50% increase in the momentum estimate. The estimated outflow properties indicate that the outflow is capable of dispersing the parent core within the typical lifetime of the embedded phase of a low-mass protostar, and that it is responsible for a core-to-star efficiency of 1/4 to 1/3. We find that the outflow cavity wall is composed of multiple shells associated with a series of jet bow-shock events. Within about 3000AU of the protostar the 13CO and C18O emission trace a circumstellar envelope with both rotation and infall motions, which we compare with a simple analytic model. The CS(2-1) emission reveals tentative evidence of a slowly-moving rotating outflow, which we suggest is entrained not only poloidally but also toroidally by a disk wind that is launched from relatively large radii from the source.
  • We present ALMA follow-up observations of two massive, early-stage core candidates, C1-N & C1-S, in Infrared Dark Cloud (IRDC) G028.37+00.07, which were previously identified by their N2D+(3-2) emission and show high levels of deuteration of this species. The cores are also dark at far infrared wavelengths up to ~100 microns. We detect 12CO(2-1) from a narrow, highly-collimated bipolar outflow that is being launched from near the center of the C1-S core, which is also the location of the peak 1.3mm dust continuum emission. This protostar, C1-Sa, has associated dense gas traced by C18O(2-1) and DCN(3-2), from which we estimate it has a radial velocity that is near the center of the range exhibited by the C1-S massive core. A second outflow-driving source is also detected within the projected boundary of C1-S, but appears to be at a different radial velocity. After considering properties of the outflows, we conclude C1-Sa is a promising candidate for an early-stage massive protostar and as such it shows that these early phases of massive star formation can involve highly ordered outflow, and thus accretion, processes, similar to models developed to explain low-mass protostars.
  • We present 30 and 40 micron imaging of the massive protostar G35.20-0.74 with SOFIA-FORCAST. The high surface density of the natal core around the protostar leads to high extinction, even at these relatively long wavelengths, causing the observed flux to be dominated by that emerging from the near-facing outflow cavity. However, emission from the far-facing cavity is still clearly detected. We combine these results with fluxes from the near-infrared to mm to construct a spectral energy distribution (SED). For isotropic emission the bolometric luminosity would be 3.3x10^4 Lsun. We perform radiative transfer modeling of a protostar forming by ordered, symmetric collapse from a massive core bounded by a clump with high mass surface density, Sigma_cl. To fit the SED requires protostellar masses ~20-34 Msun depending on the outflow cavity opening angle (35 - 50 degrees), and Sigma_cl ~ 0.4-1 g cm-2. After accounting for the foreground extinction and the flashlight effect, the true bolometric luminosity is ~ (0.7-2.2)x10^5 Lsun. One of these models also has excellent agreement with the observed intensity profiles along the outflow axis at 10, 18, 31 and 37 microns. Overall our results support a model of massive star formation involving the relatively ordered, symmetric collapse of a massive, dense core and the launching bipolar outflows that clear low density cavities. Thus a unified model may apply for the formation of both low and high mass stars.
  • We demonstrate a large light absorptance (80%) in a nanometric layer of quantum dots in rods (QRs) with a thickness of 23 nm. This behavior is explained in terms of the coherent absorption by interference of the light incident at a certain angle onto the very thin QR layer. We exploit this coherent light absorption to enhance the photoluminescent emission from the QRs. Up to a seven- and fivefold enhancement of the photoluminescence is observed for p- and s-polarized incident light, respectively.
  • (Abridged) We present radiation transfer simulations of a massive (8 Msun) protostar forming from a massive (Mc=60 Msun) protostellar core, extending the model developed by Zhang & Tan (2011). The two principal improvements are (1) developing a model for the density and velocity structure of a disk wind that fills the bipolar outflow cavities; and (2) solving for the radially varying accretion rate in the disk due to a supply of mass and angular momentum from the infall envelope and their loss to the disk wind. One consequence of the launching of the disk wind is a reduction in the amount of accretion power that is radiated by the disk. For the transition from dusty to dust-free conditions where gas opacities dominate, we now implement a gradual change as a more realistic approximation of dust destruction. We study how the above effects, especially the outflow, influence the SEDs and the images of the protostar. Dust in the outflow cavity significantly affects the SEDs at most viewing angles. It further attenuates the short-wavelength flux from the protostar, controlling how the accretion disk may be viewed, and contributes a significant part of the near- and mid-IR fluxes. These fluxes warm the disk, boosting the mid- and far-IR emission. We find that for near face-on views, the SED from the near-IR to about 60 micron is very flat, which may be used to identify such systems. We show that the near-facing outflow cavity and its walls are still the most significant features in images up to 70 micron, dominating the mid-IR emission and determining its morphology. The thermal emission from the dusty outflow itself dominates the flux at ~20 micron. The detailed distribution of the dust in the outflow affects the morphology, for example, even though the outflow cavity is wide, at 10 to 20 micron, the dust in the disk wind can make the outflow appear narrower than in the near-IR bands.