• Because the timescale of H$\alpha$ emission (several tens of Myr) following star formation is significantly shorter than that of UV radiation (a few hundred Myr), the H$\alpha$/UV flux ratio provides insight on the star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies on timescales shorter than $\sim100$ Myr. We present H$\alpha$/UV ratios for galaxies at $z=$ 0.02--0.1 on the familiar star-forming main sequence based on the AKARI-GALEX-SDSS archive dataset. The data provide us with robust measurements of dust-corrected SFRs in both H$\alpha$ and UV for 1,050 galaxies. The results show a correlation between the H$\alpha$/UV ratio and the deviation from the main sequence in the sense that galaxies above/below the main sequence tend to have higher/lower H$\alpha$/UV ratios. This trend increases the dispersion of the main sequence by 0.04 dex (a small fraction of the total scatter of 0.36 dex), suggesting that diversity of recent SFHs of galaxies has a direct impact on the observed main sequence scatter. We caution that the results suffer from incompleteness and a selection bias which may lead us to miss many sources with high H$\alpha$/UV ratios, this could further increase the scatter from SFHs in the star-forming main sequence.
  • We investigate the galaxy quenching process at intermediate redshift using a sample of $\sim4400$ galaxies with $M_{\ast} > 10^{9}M_{\odot}$ between redshift 0.5 and 1.0 in all five CANDELS fields. We divide this sample, using the integrated specific star formation rate (sSFR), into four sub-groups: star-forming galaxies (SFGs) above and below the ridge of the star-forming main sequence (SFMS), transition galaxies and quiescent galaxies. We study their $UVI$ ($U-V$ versus $V-I$) color gradients to infer their sSFR gradients out to twice effective radii. We show that on average both star-forming and transition galaxies at all masses are not fully quenched at any radii, whereas quiescent galaxies are fully quenched at all radii. We find that at low masses ($M_{\ast} = 10^{9}-10^{10}M_{\odot}$) SFGs both above and below the SFMS ridge generally have flat sSFR profiles, whereas the transition galaxies at the same masses generally have sSFRs that are more suppressed in their outskirts. In contrast, at high masses ($M_{\ast} > 10^{10.5}M_{\odot}$), SFGs above and below the SFMS ridge and transition galaxies generally have varying degrees of more centrally-suppressed sSFRs relative to their outskirts. These findings indicate that at $z\sim~0.5-1.0$ the main galaxy quenching mode depends on its already formed stellar mass, exhibiting a transition from "the outside-in" at $M_{\ast} \leq 10^{10}M_{\odot}$ to "the inside-out" at $M_{\ast} > 10^{10.5}M_{\odot}$. In other words, our findings support that internal processes dominate the quenching of massive galaxies, whereas external processes dominate the quenching of low-mass galaxies.
  • This is the first in a series of papers examining the demographics of star-forming galaxies at $0.2<z<2.5$ in CANDELS. We study 9,100 galaxies from GOODS-S and UDS having published values of redshifts, masses, star-formation rates (SFRs), and dust attenuation ($A_V$) derived from UV-optical SED fitting. In agreement with previous works, we find that the $UVJ$ colors of a galaxy are closely correlated with its specific star-formation rate (SSFR) and $A_V$. We define rotated $UVJ$ coordinate axes, termed $S_\mathrm{SED}$ and $C_\mathrm{SED}$, that are parallel and perpendicular to the star-forming sequence and derive a quantitative calibration that predicts SSFR from $C_\mathrm{SED}$ with an accuracy of ~0.2 dex. SFRs from UV-optical fitting and from UV+IR values based on Spitzer/MIPS 24 $\mu\mathrm{m}$ agree well overall, but systematic differences of order 0.2 dex exist at high and low redshifts. A novel plotting scheme conveys the evolution of multiple galaxy properties simultaneously, and dust growth, as well as star-formation decline and quenching, exhibit "mass-accelerated evolution" ("downsizing"). A population of transition galaxies below the star-forming main sequence is identified. These objects are located between star-forming and quiescent galaxies in $UVJ$ space and have lower $A_V$ and smaller radii than galaxies on the main sequence. Their properties are consistent with their being in transit between the two regions. The relative numbers of quenched, transition, and star-forming galaxies are given as a function of mass and redshift.
  • We have measured the radial profiles of isophotal ellipticity ($\varepsilon$) and disky/boxy parameter A$_4$ out to radii of about three times the semi-major axes for $\sim4,600$ star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at intermediate redshifts $0.5<z<1.8$ in the CANDELS/GOODS-S and UDS fields. Based on the average size versus stellar-mass relation in each redshift bin, we divide our galaxies into Small SFGs (SSFGs), i.e., smaller than average for its mass, and Large SFGs (LSFGs), i.e., larger than average. We find that, at low masses ($M_{\ast} < 10^{10}M_{\odot}$), the SSFGs generally have nearly flat $\varepsilon$ and A$_4$ profiles for both edge-on and face-on views, especially at redshifts $z>1$. Moreover, the median A$_4$ values at all radii are almost zero. In contrast, the highly-inclined, low-mass LSFGs in the same mass-redshift bins generally have monotonically increasing $\varepsilon$ with radius and are dominated by disky values at intermediate radii. These findings at intermediate redshifts imply that low-mass SSFGs are not disk-like, while low-mass LSFGs appear to harbour disk-like components flattened by significant rotation. At high masses ($M_{\ast} > 10^{10}M_{\odot}$), highly-inclined SSFGs and LSFGs both exhibit a general, distinct trend for both $\varepsilon$ and A$_4$ profiles: increasing values with radius at lower radii, reaching maxima at intermediate radii, and then decreasing values at larger radii. Such a trend is more prevalent for more massive ($M_{\ast} > 10^{10.5}M_{\odot}$) galaxies or those at lower redshifts ($z<1.4$). The distinct trend in $\varepsilon$ and A$_4$ can be simply explained if galaxies possess all three components: central bulges, disks in the intermediate regions, and halo-like stellar components in the outskirts.
  • We use the deep CANDELS observations in the GOODS North and South fields to revisit the correlations between stellar mass ($M_*$), star--formation rate (SFR) and morphology, and to introduce a fourth dimension, the mass-weighted stellar age, in galaxies at $1.2<z<4$. We do this by making new measures of $M_*$, $SFR$, and stellar age thanks to an improved SED fitting procedure that allows various star formation history for each galaxy. Like others, we find that the slope of the Main Sequence (MS) of star formation in the $(M_*;SFR)$ plane bends at high mass. We observe clear morphological differences among galaxies across the MS, which also correlate with stellar age. At all redshifts, galaxies that are quenching or quenched, and thus old, have high $\Sigma_1$ (the projected density within the central 1 kpc), while younger, star-forming galaxies span a much broader range of $\Sigma_1$, which includes the high values observed for quenched galaxies, but also extends to much lower values. As galaxies age and quench, the stellar age and the dispersion of $\Sigma_1$ for fixed values of $M_{*}$ shows two different regimes, one, at the low--mass end, where quenching might be driven by causes external to the galaxies; the other, at the high--mass end, where quenching is driven by internal causes, very likely the mass given the low scatter of $\Sigma_1$ (mass quenching). We suggest that the monotonic increase of central density as galaxies grow is one manifestation of a more general phenomenon of structural transformation that galaxies undergo as they evolve.
  • Studying giant star-forming clumps in distant galaxies is important to understand galaxy formation and evolution. At present, however, observers and theorists have not reached a consensus on whether the observed "clumps" in distant galaxies are the same phenomenon that is seen in simulations. In this paper, as a step to establish a benchmark of direct comparisons between observations and theories, we publish a sample of clumps constructed to represent the commonly observed "clumps" in the literature. This sample contains 3193 clumps detected from 1270 galaxies at $0.5 \leq z < 3.0$. The clumps are detected from rest-frame UV images, as described in our previous paper. Their physical properties, e.g., rest-frame color, stellar mass (M*), star formation rate (SFR), age, and dust extinction, are measured by fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) to synthetic stellar population models. We carefully test the procedures of measuring clump properties, especially the method of subtracting background fluxes from the diffuse component of galaxies. With our fiducial background subtraction, we find a radial clump U-V color variation, where clumps close to galactic centers are redder than those in outskirts. The slope of the color gradient (clump color as a function of their galactocentric distance scaled by the semi-major axis of galaxies) changes with redshift and M* of the host galaxies: at a fixed M*, the slope becomes steeper toward low redshift, and at a fixed redshift, it becomes slightly steeper with M*. Based on our SED-fitting, this observed color gradient can be explained by a combination of a negative age gradient, a negative E(B-V) gradient, and a positive specific star formation rate gradient of the clumps. We also find that the color gradients of clumps are steeper than those of intra-clump regions. [Abridged]
  • We study galactic star-formation activity as a function of environment and stellar mass over 0.5<z<2.0 using the FourStar Galaxy Evolution (ZFOURGE) survey. We estimate the galaxy environment using a Bayesian-motivated measure of the distance to the third nearest neighbor for galaxies to the stellar mass completeness of our survey, $\log(M/M_\odot)>9 (9.5)$ at z=1.3 (2.0). This method, when applied to a mock catalog with the photometric-redshift precision ($\sigma_z / (1+z) \lesssim 0.02$), recovers galaxies in low- and high-density environments accurately. We quantify the environmental quenching efficiency, and show that at z> 0.5 it depends on galaxy stellar mass, demonstrating that the effects of quenching related to (stellar) mass and environment are not separable. In high-density environments, the mass and environmental quenching efficiencies are comparable for massive galaxies ($\log (M/M_\odot)\gtrsim$ 10.5) at all redshifts. For lower mass galaxies ($\log (M/M)_\odot) \lesssim$ 10), the environmental quenching efficiency is very low at $z\gtrsim$ 1.5, but increases rapidly with decreasing redshift. Environmental quenching can account for nearly all quiescent lower mass galaxies ($\log(M/M_\odot) \sim$ 9-10), which appear primarily at $z\lesssim$ 1.0. The morphologies of lower mass quiescent galaxies are inconsistent with those expected of recently quenched star-forming galaxies. Some environmental process must transform the morphologies on similar timescales as the environmental quenching itself. The evolution of the environmental quenching favors models that combine gas starvation (as galaxies become satellites) with gas exhaustion through star-formation and outflows ("overconsumption"), and additional processes such as galaxy interactions, tidal stripping and disk fading to account for the morphological differences between the quiescent and star-forming galaxy populations.
  • The rest-frame UV-optical (i.e., $NUV-B$) color is sensitive to both low-level recent star formation (specific star formation rate - sSFR) and dust. In this Letter, we extend our previous work on the origins of $NUV-B$ color gradients in star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at $z\sim1$ to those at $z\sim2$. We use a sample of 1335 large (semi-major axis radius $R_{\rm SMA}>0.''18$) SFGs with extended UV emission out to $2R_{\rm SMA}$ in the mass range $M_{\ast} = 10^{9}-10^{11}M_{\odot}$ at $1.5<z<2.8$ in the CANDELS/GOODS-S and UDS fields. We show that these SFGs generally have negative $NUV-B$ color gradients (redder centres), and their color gradients strongly increase with galaxy mass. We also show that the global rest-frame $FUV-NUV$ color is approximately linear with $A_{\rm V}$, which is derived by modeling the observed integrated FUV to NIR spectral energy distributions of the galaxies. Applying this integrated calibration to our spatially-resolved data, we find a negative dust gradient (more dust extinguished in the centers), which steadily becomes steeper with galaxy mass. We further find that the $NUV-B$ color gradients become nearly zero after correcting for dust gradients regardless of galaxy mass. This indicates that the sSFR gradients are negligible and dust reddening is likely the principal cause of negative UV-optical color gradients in these SFGs. Our findings support that the buildup of the stellar mass in SFGs at the Cosmic Noon is self-similar inside $2R_{\rm SMA}$.
  • We investigate the environmental quenching of galaxies, especially those with stellar masses (M*)$<10^{9.5} M_\odot$, beyond the local universe. Essentially all local low-mass quenched galaxies (QGs) are believed to live close to massive central galaxies, which is a demonstration of environmental quenching. We use CANDELS data to test {\it whether or not} such a dwarf QG--massive central galaxy connection exists beyond the local universe. To this purpose, we only need a statistically representative, rather than a complete, sample of low-mass galaxies, which enables our study to $z\gtrsim1.5$. For each low-mass galaxy, we measure the projected distance ($d_{proj}$) to its nearest massive neighbor (M*$>10^{10.5} M_\odot$) within a redshift range. At a given redshift and M*, the environmental quenching effect is considered to be observed if the $d_{proj}$ distribution of QGs ($d_{proj}^Q$) is significantly skewed toward lower values than that of star-forming galaxies ($d_{proj}^{SF}$). For galaxies with $10^{8} M_\odot < M* < 10^{10} M_\odot$, such a difference between $d_{proj}^Q$ and $d_{proj}^{SF}$ is detected up to $z\sim1$. Also, about 10\% of the quenched galaxies in our sample are located between two and four virial radii ($R_{Vir}$) of the massive halos. The median projected distance from low-mass QGs to their massive neighbors, $d_{proj}^Q / R_{Vir}$, decreases with satellite M* at $M* \lesssim 10^{9.5} M_\odot$, but increases with satellite M* at $M* \gtrsim 10^{9.5} M_\odot$. This trend suggests a smooth, if any, transition of the quenching timescale around $M* \sim 10^{9.5} M_\odot$ at $0.5<z<1.0$.
  • This paper uses radial colour profiles to infer the distributions of dust, gas and star formation in z=0.4-1.4 star-forming main sequence galaxies. We start with the standard UVJ-based method to estimate dust extinction and specific star formation rate (sSFR). By replacing J with I band, a new calibration method suitable for use with ACS+WFC3 data is created (i.e. UVI diagram). Using a multi-wavelength multi-aperture photometry catalogue based on CANDELS, UVI colour profiles of 1328 galaxies are stacked in stellar mass and redshift bins. The resulting colour gradients, covering a radial range of 0.2--2.0 effective radii, increase strongly with galaxy mass and with global $A_V$. Colour gradient directions are nearly parallel to the Calzetti extinction vector, indicating that dust plays a more important role than stellar population variations. With our calibration, the resulting $A_V$ profiles fall much more slowly than stellar mass profiles over the measured radial range. sSFR gradients are nearly flat without central quenching signatures, except for $M_*>10^{10.5} M_{\odot}$, where central declines of 20--25 per cent are observed. Both sets of profiles agree well with previous radial sSFR and (continuum) $A_V$ measurements. They are also consistent with the sSFR profiles and, if assuming a radially constant gas-to-dust ratio, gas profiles in recent hydrodynamic models. We finally discuss the striking findings that SFR scales with stellar mass density in the inner parts of galaxies, and that dust content is high in the outer parts despite low stellar-mass surface densities there.
  • We study winds in 12 X-ray AGN host galaxies at z ~ 1. We find, using the low-ionization Fe II 2586 absorption in the stacked spectra, that the probability distribution function (PDF) of the centroid velocity shift in AGN has a median, 16th and 84th percentiles of (-87, -251, +86) km/s respectively. The PDF of the velocity dispersion in AGN has a median, 84th and 16th percentile of (139, 253, 52) km/s respectively. The centroid velocity and the velocity dispersions are obtained from a two component (ISM+wind) absorption line model. The equivalent width PDF of the outflow in AGN has median, 84th and 16th percentiles of (0.4, 0.8, 0.1) Angstrom. There is a strong ISM component in Fe II 2586 absorption with (1.2, 1.5, 0.8) Angstrom, implying presence of substantial amount cold gas in the host galaxies. For comparison, star-forming and X-ray undetected galaxies at a similar redshift, matched roughly in stellar mass and galaxy inclination, have a centroid velocity PDF with percentiles of (-74, -258, +90) km/s, and a velocity dispersion PDF percentiles of (150, 259, 57) km/s. Thus, winds in the AGN are similar to star-formation-driven winds, and are too weak to escape and expel substantial cool gas from galaxies. Our sample doubles the previous sample of AGN studied at z ~ 0.5 and extends the analysis to z ~ 1. A joint reanalysis of the z ~ 0.5 AGN sample and our sample yields consistent results to the measurements above.
  • We present a 0.4-8$\mu$m multi-wavelength photometric catalog in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS) field. This catalog is built on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3 and ACS data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), and it incorporates the existing HST data from the All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS) and the 3D-HST program. The catalog is based on detections in the F160W band reaching a depth of F160W=26.62 AB (90% completeness, point-sources). It includes the photometry for 41457 objects over an area of $\approx 206$ arcmin$^2$ in the following bands: HST ACS F606W and F814W; HST WFC3 F125W, F140W and F160W; CFHT/Megacam $u^*$, $g'$, $r'$, $i'$ and $z'$; CFHT/WIRCAM $J$, $H$ and $K_\mathrm{S}$; Mayall/NEWFIRM $J1$, $J2$, $J3$, $H1$, $H2$, $K$; Spitzer IRAC $3.6\mu$m, $4.5\mu$m, $5.8\mu$m and $8.0\mu$m. We are also releasing value-added catalogs that provide robust photometric redshifts and stellar mass measurements. The catalogs are publicly available through the CANDELS repository.
  • We investigate the burstiness of star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies at $0.4<z<1$ by using the ratio of star formation rates (SFRs) measured from H$\beta$ and FUV (1500 \AA) (H$\beta$--to--FUV ratio). Our sample contains 164 galaxies down to stellar mass (M*) of $10^{8.5} M_\odot$ in the CANDELS GOODS-N region, where Team Keck Redshift Survey DEIMOS spectroscopy and HST/WFC3 F275W images from CANDELS and Hubble Deep UV Legacy Survey are available. When the {\it ratio} of H$\beta$- and FUV-derived SFRs is measured, dust extinction correction is negligible (except for very dusty galaxies) with the Calzetti attenuation curve. The H$\beta$--to--FUV ratio of our sample increases with M* and SFR. The median ratio is $\sim$0.7 at M*$\sim10^{8.5} M_\odot$ (or SFR$\sim 0.5 M_\odot/yr$) and increases to $\sim$1 at M*$\sim10^{10} M_\odot$ (or SFR $\sim 10 M_\odot/yr$). At M*$<10^{9.5} M_\odot$, our median H$\beta$--to--FUV ratio is lower than that of local galaxies at the same M*, implying a redshift evolution. Bursty SFH on a timescale of a few tens of megayears on galactic scales provides a plausible explanation of our results, and the importance of the burstiness increases as M* decreases. Due to sample selection effects, our H$\beta$--to--FUV ratio may be an upper limit of the true value of a complete sample, which strengthens our conclusions. Other models, e.g., non-universal initial mass function or stochastic star formation on star cluster scales, are unable to plausibly explain our results.
  • We study the evolution of giant clumps in high-z disc galaxies using AMR cosmological simulations at redshifts z=6-1. Our sample consists of 34 galaxies, of halo masses 10^{11}-10^{12}M_s at z=2, run with and without radiation pressure (RP) feedback from young stars. While RP has little effect on the sizes and global stability of discs, it reduces the amount of star-forming gas by a factor of ~2, leading to a decrease in stellar mass by a similar factor by z~2. Both samples undergo violent disc instability (VDI) and form giant clumps of masses 10^7-10^9M_s at a similar rate, though RP significantly reduces the number of long-lived clumps. When RP is (not) included, clumps with circular velocity <40(20)km/s, baryonic surface density <200(100)M_s/pc^2 and baryonic mass <10^{8.2}(10^{7.3})M_s are short-lived, disrupted in a few free-fall times. The more massive and dense clumps survive and migrate toward the disc centre over a few disc orbital times. In the RP simulations, the distribution of clump masses and star-formation rates (SFRs) normalized to their host disc is very similar at all redshifts. They exhibit a truncated power-law with a slope slightly shallower than -2. Short-lived clumps preferentially have young stellar ages, low masses, high gas fractions and specific SFRs (sSFR), and they tend to populate the outer disc. The sSFR of massive, long-lived clumps declines with age as they migrate towards the disc centre, producing gradients in mass, stellar age, gas fraction, sSFR and metallicity that distinguish them from short-lived clumps. Ex situ mergers make up ~37% of the mass in clumps and ~29% of the SFR. They are more massive and with older stellar ages than the in situ clumps, especially near the disc edge. Roughly half the galaxies at redshifts z=4-1 are clumpy over a wide range of stellar mass, with clumps accounting for ~3-30% of the SFR but ~0.1-3% of the stellar mass.
  • We present galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMFs) at $z=$ 4-8 from a rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) selected sample of $\sim$4500 galaxies, found via photometric redshifts over an area of $\sim$280 arcmin$^2$ in the CANDELS/GOODS fields and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The deepest Spitzer/IRAC data yet-to-date and the relatively large volume allow us to place a better constraint at both the low- and high-mass ends of the GSMFs compared to previous space-based studies from pre-CANDELS observations. Supplemented by a stacking analysis, we find a linear correlation between the rest-frame UV absolute magnitude at 1500 \AA\ ($M_{\rm UV}$) and logarithmic stellar mass ($\log M_*$) that holds for galaxies with $\log(M_*/M_{\odot}) \lesssim 10$. We use simulations to validate our method of measuring the slope of the $\log M_*$-$M_{\rm UV}$ relation, finding that the bias is minimized with a hybrid technique combining photometry of individual bright galaxies with stacked photometry for faint galaxies. The resultant measured slopes do not significantly evolve over $z=$ 4-8, while the normalization of the trend exhibits a weak evolution toward lower masses at higher redshift. We combine the $\log M_*$-$M_{\rm UV}$ distribution with observed rest-frame UV luminosity functions at each redshift to derive the GSMFs, finding that the low-mass-end slope becomes steeper with increasing redshift from $\alpha=-1.55^{+0.08}_{-0.07}$ at $z=4$ to $\alpha=-2.25^{+0.72}_{-0.35}$ at $z=8$. The inferred stellar mass density, when integrated over $M_*=10^8$-$10^{13} M_{\odot}$, increases by a factor of $10^{+30}_{-2}$ between $z=7$ and $z=4$ and is in good agreement with the time integral of the cosmic star formation rate density.
  • We present results from a survey of the internal kinematics of 49 star-forming galaxies at z$\,\sim\,$2 in the CANDELS fields with the Keck/MOSFIRE spectrograph (SIGMA, Survey in the near-Infrared of Galaxies with Multiple position Angles). Kinematics (rotation velocity $V_{rot}$ and integrated gas velocity dispersion $\sigma_g$) are measured from nebular emission lines which trace the hot ionized gas surrounding star-forming regions. We find that by z$\,\sim\,$2, massive star-forming galaxies ($\log\,M_*/M_{\odot}\gtrsim10.2$) have assembled primitive disks: their kinematics are dominated by rotation, they are consistent with a marginally stable disk model, and they form a Tully-Fisher relation. These massive galaxies have values of $V_{rot}/\sigma_g$ which are factors of 2-5 lower than local well-ordered galaxies at similar masses. Such results are consistent with findings by other studies. We find that low mass galaxies ($\log\,M_*/M_{\odot}\lesssim10.2$) at this epoch are still in the early stages of disk assembly: their kinematics are often supported by gas velocity dispersion and they fall from the Tully-Fisher relation to significantly low values of $V_{rot}$. This "kinematic downsizing" implies that the process(es) responsible for disrupting disks at z$\,\sim\,$2 have a stronger effect and/or are more active in low mass systems. In conclusion, we find that the period of rapid stellar mass growth at z$\,\sim\,$2 is coincident with the nascent assembly of low mass disks and the assembly and settling of high mass disks.
  • The rest-frame UV-optical (i.e., NUV-B) color index is sensitive to the low-level recent star formation and dust extinction, but it is insensitive to the metallicity. In this Letter, we have measured the rest-frame NUV-B color gradients in ~1400 large ($\rm r_e>0.18^{\prime\prime}$), nearly face-on (b/a>0.5) main-sequence star-forming galaxies (SFGs) between redshift 0.5 and 1.5 in the CANDELS/GOODS-S and UDS fields. With this sample, we study the origin of UV-optical color gradients in the SFGs at z~1 and discuss their link with the buildup of stellar mass. We find that the more massive, centrally compact, and more dust extinguished SFGs tend to have statistically more negative raw color gradients (redder centers) than the less massive, centrally diffuse, and less dusty SFGs. After correcting for dust reddening based on optical-SED fitting, the color gradients in the low-mass ($M_{\ast} <10^{10}M_{\odot}$) SFGs generally become quite flat, while most of the high-mass ($M_{\ast} > 10^{10.5}M_{\odot}$) SFGs still retain shallow negative color gradients. These findings imply that dust reddening is likely the principal cause of negative color gradients in the low-mass SFGs, while both increased central dust reddening and buildup of compact old bulges are likely the origins of negative color gradients in the high-mass SFGs. These findings also imply that at these redshifts the low-mass SFGs buildup their stellar masses in a self-similar way, while the high-mass SFGs grow inside out.
  • We present the stellar mass ($M_{*}$)--gas-phase metallicity relation (MZR) and its scatter at intermediate redshifts ($0.5\leq z\leq0.7$) for 1381 field galaxies collected from deep spectroscopic surveys. The star formation rate (SFR) and color at a given $M_{*}$ of this magnitude-limited ($R\lesssim24$ AB) sample are representative of normal star-forming galaxies. For masses below $10^9 M_\odot$, our sample of 237 galaxies is $\sim$10 times larger than those in previous studies beyond the local universe. This huge gain in sample size enables superior constraints on the MZR and its scatter in the low-mass regime. We find a power-law MZR at $10^{8} M_\odot < M_{*} < 10^{11} M_\odot$: ${12+log(O/H) = (5.83\pm0.19) + (0.30\pm0.02)log(M_{*}/M_\odot)}$. Our MZR shows good agreement with others measured at similar redshifts in the literature in the intermediate and massive regimes, but is shallower than the extrapolation of the MZRs of others to masses below $10^{9} M_\odot$. The SFR dependence of the MZR in our sample is weaker than that found for local galaxies (known as the Fundamental Metallicity Relation). Compared to a variety of theoretical models, the slope of our MZR for low-mass galaxies agrees well with predictions incorporating supernova energy-driven winds. Being robust against currently uncertain metallicity calibrations, the scatter of the MZR serves as a powerful diagnostic of the stochastic history of gas accretion, gas recycling, and star formation of low-mass galaxies. Our major result is that the scatter of our MZR increases as $M_{*}$ decreases. Our result implies that either the scatter of the baryonic accretion rate or the scatter of the $M_{*}$--$M_{halo}$ relation increases as $M_{*}$ decreases. Moreover, our measures of scatter at $z=0.7$ appears consistent with that found for local galaxies.
  • We present estimates of intrinsic scatter in the Star Formation Rate (SFR) - Stellar Mass (M*) correlation in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 3.0 and in the mass range 10^7 < M* < 10^11 Msun. We utilize photometry in the Hubble Ultradeep Field (HUDF12), Ultraviolet Ultra Deep Field (UVUDF) campaigns and CANDELS/GOODS-S. We estimate SFR, M* from broadband Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) and the best available redshifts. The maximum depth of the HUDF photometry (F160W 29.9 AB, 5 sigma depth) probes the SFR-M* correlation down to M* ~ 10 ^7 Msun, a factor of 10-100X lower in M* than previous studies, and comparable to dwarf galaxies in the local universe. We find the slope of the SFR-M* relationship to be near unity at all redshifts and the normalization to decrease with cosmic time. We find a moderate increase in intrinsic scatter with cosmic time from 0.2 to 0.4 dex across the epoch of peak cosmic star formation. None of our redshift bins show a statistically significant increase in intrinsic scatter at low mass. However, it remains possible that intrinsic scatter increases at low mass on timescales shorter than ~ 100 Myr. Our results are consistent with a picture of gradual and self-similar assembly of galaxies across more than three orders of magnitude in stellar mass from as low as 10^7 Msun.
  • Important but rare and subtle processes driving galaxy morphology and star-formation may be missed by traditional spiral, elliptical, irregular or S\'ersic bulge/disk classifications. To overcome this limitation, we use a principal component analysis of non-parametric morphological indicators (concentration, asymmetry, Gini coefficient, $M_{20}$, multi-mode, intensity and deviation) measured at rest-frame $B$-band (corresponding to HST/WFC3 F125W at 1.4 $< z <$ 2) to trace the natural distribution of massive ($>10^{10} M_{\odot}$) galaxy morphologies. Principal component analysis (PCA) quantifies the correlations between these morphological indicators and determines the relative importance of each. The first three principal components (PCs) capture $\sim$75 per cent of the variance inherent to our sample. We interpret the first principal component (PC) as bulge strength, the second PC as dominated by concentration and the third PC as dominated by asymmetry. Both PC1 and PC2 correlate with the visual appearance of a central bulge and predict galaxy quiescence. PC1 is a better predictor of quenching than stellar mass, as as good as other structural indicators (S\'ersic-n or compactness). We divide the PCA results into groups using an agglomerative hierarchical clustering method. Unlike S\'ersic, this classification scheme separates compact galaxies from larger, smooth proto-elliptical systems, and star-forming disk-dominated clumpy galaxies from star-forming bulge-dominated asymmetric galaxies. Distinguishing between these galaxy structural types in a quantitative manner is an important step towards understanding the connections between morphology, galaxy assembly and star-formation.
  • We present the Team Keck Redshift Survey 2 (TKRS2), a near-infrared spectral observing program targeting selected galaxies within the CANDELS subsection of the GOODS-North Field. The TKRS2 program exploits the unique capabilities of MOSFIRE, an infrared multi-object spectrometer which entered service on the Keck I telescope in 2012 and contributes substantially to the study of galaxy spectral features at redshifts inaccessible to optical spectrographs. The TKRS2 project targets 97 galaxies drawn from samples that include z~2 emission-line galaxies with features observable in the JHK bands as well as lower-redshift targets with features in the Y band. We present a detailed measurement of MOSFIRE's sensitivity as a function of wavelength, including the effects of telluric features across the YJHK filters. The largest utility of our survey is in providing rest-frame-optical emission lines for z>1 galaxies, and we demonstrate that the ratios of strong, optical emission lines of z~2 galaxies suggest the presence of either higher N/O abundances than are found in z~0 galaxies or low-metallicity gas ionized by an active galactic nucleus. We have released all TKRS2 data products into the public domain to allow researchers access to representative raw and reduced MOSFIRE spectra.
  • In this paper we perform a comprehensive study of the main sources of random and systematic errors in stellar mass measurement for galaxies using their Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). We use mock galaxy catalogs with simulated multi-waveband photometry (from U-band to mid-infrared) and known redshift, stellar mass, age and extinction for individual galaxies. Given different parameters affecting stellar mass measurement (photometric S/N ratios, SED fitting errors, systematic effects, the inherent degeneracies and correlated errors), we formulated different simulated galaxy catalogs to quantify these effects individually. We studied the sensitivity of stellar mass estimates to the codes/methods used, population synthesis models, star formation histories, nebular emission line contributions, photometric uncertainties, extinction and age. For each simulated galaxy, the difference between the input stellar masses and those estimated using different simulation catalogs, $\Delta\log(M)$, was calculated and used to identify the most fundamental parameters affecting stellar masses. We measured different components of the error budget, with the results listed as follows: (1). no significant bias was found among different codes/methods, with all having comparable scatter; (2). A source of error is found to be due to photometric uncertainties and low resolution in age and extinction grids; (3). The median of stellar masses among different methods provides a stable measure of the mass associated with any given galaxy; (4). The deviations in stellar mass strongly correlate with those in age, with a weaker correlation with extinction; (5). the scatter in the stellar masses due to free parameters are quantified, with the sensitivity of the stellar mass to both the population synthesis codes and inclusion of nebular emission lines studied.
  • We use data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey to study how the spatial variation in the stellar populations of galaxies relate to the formation of galaxies at $1.5 < z < 3.5$. We use the Internal Color Dispersion (ICD), measured between the rest-frame UV and optical bands, which is sensitive to age (and dust attenuation) variations in stellar populations. The ICD shows a relation with the stellar masses and morphologies of the galaxies. Galaxies with the largest variation in their stellar populations as evidenced by high ICD have disk-dominated morphologies (with S\'{e}rsic indexes $< 2$) and stellar masses between $10 < \mathrm{Log~M/ M_\odot}< 11$. There is a marked decrease in the ICD as the stellar mass and/or the S\'ersic index increases. By studying the relations between the ICD and other galaxy properties including sizes, total colors, star-formation rate, and dust attenuation, we conclude that the largest variations in stellar populations occur in galaxies where the light from newly, high star-forming clumps contrasts older stellar disk populations. This phase reaches a peak for galaxies only with a specific stellar mass range, $10 < \mathrm{Log~M/ M_\odot} < 11$, and prior to the formation of a substantial bulge/spheroid. In contrast, galaxies at higher or lower stellar masses, and/or higher S\'{e}rsic index ($n > 2$) show reduced ICD values, implying a greater homogeneity of their stellar populations. This indicates that if a galaxy is to have both a quiescent bulge along with a star forming disk, typical of Hubble Sequence galaxies, this is most common for stellar masses $10 < \mathrm{Log~M/M_\odot} < 11$ and when the bulge component remains relatively small ($n<2$).
  • Although giant clumps of stars are crucial to galaxy formation and evolution, the most basic demographics of clumps are still uncertain, mainly because the definition of clumps has not been thoroughly discussed. In this paper, we study the basic demographics of clumps in star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 0.5<z<3, using our proposed physical definition that UV-bright clumps are discrete star-forming regions that individually contribute more than 8% of the rest-frame UV light of their galaxies. Clumps defined this way are significantly brighter than the HII regions of nearby large spiral galaxies, either individually or blended, when physical spatial resolution and cosmological dimming are considered. Under this definition, we measure the fraction of SFGs that contain at least one off-center clump (Fclumpy) and the contributions of clumps to the rest-frame UV light and star formation rate of SFGs in the CANDELS/GOODS-S and UDS fields, where our mass-complete sample consists of 3239 galaxies with axial ratio q>0.5. The redshift evolution of Fclumpy changes with the stellar mass (M*) of the galaxies. Low-mass (log(M*/Msun)<9.8) galaxies keep an almost constant Fclumpy of about 60% from z~3.0 to z~0.5. Intermediate-mass and massive galaxies drop their Fclumpy from 55% at z~3.0 to 40% and 15%, respectively, at z~0.5. We find that (1) the trend of disk stabilization predicted by violent disk instability matches the Fclumpy trend of massive galaxies; (2) minor mergers are a viable explanation of the Fclumpy trend of intermediate-mass galaxies at z<1.5, given a realistic observability timescale; and (3) major mergers are unlikely responsible for the Fclumpy trend in all masses at z<1.5. The clump contribution to the rest-frame UV light of SFGs shows a broad peak around galaxies with log(M*/Msun)~10.5 at all redshifts, possibly linked to the molecular gas fraction of the galaxies. (Abridged)
  • We combine HST/WFC3 imaging and G141 grism observations from the CANDELS and 3D-HST surveys to produce a catalog of grism spectroscopic redshifts for galaxies in the CANDELS/GOODS-South field. The WFC3/G141 grism spectra cover a wavelength range of 1.1<lambda<1.7 microns with a resolving power of R~130 for point sources, thus providing rest-frame optical spectra for galaxies out to z~3.5. The catalog is selected in the H-band (F160W) and includes both galaxies with and without previously published spectroscopic redshifts. Grism spectra are extracted for all H-band detected galaxies with H<24 and a CANDELS photometric redshift z_phot > 0.6. The resulting spectra are visually inspected to identify emission lines and redshifts are determined using cross-correlation with empirical spectral templates. To establish the accuracy of our redshifts, we compare our results against high-quality spectroscopic redshifts from the literature. Using a sample of 411 control galaxies, this analysis yields a precision of sigma_NMAD=0.0028 for the grism-derived redshifts, which is consistent with the accuracy reported by the 3D-HST team. Our final catalog covers an area of 153 square arcmin and contains 1019 redshifts for galaxies in GOODS-S. Roughly 60% (608/1019) of these redshifts are for galaxies with no previously published spectroscopic redshift. These new redshifts span a range of 0.677 < z < 3.456 and have a median redshift of z=1.282. The catalog contains a total of 234 new redshifts for galaxies at z>1.5. In addition, we present 20 galaxy pair candidates identified for the first time using the grism redshifts in our catalog, including four new galaxy pairs at z~2, nearly doubling the number of such pairs previously identified.