• In radio astronomy, the Ultra-Long Wavelengths (ULW) regime of longer than 10 m (frequencies below 30 MHz), remains the last virtually unexplored window of the celestial electromagnetic spectrum. The strength of the science case for extending radio astronomy into the ULW window is growing. However, the opaqueness of the Earth's ionosphere makes ULW observations by ground-based facilities practically impossible. Furthermore, the ULW spectrum is full of anthropogenic radio frequency interference (RFI). The only radical solution for both problems is in placing an ULW astronomy facility in space. We present a concept of a key element of a space-borne ULW array facility, an antenna that addresses radio astronomical specifications. A tripole-type antenna and amplifier are analysed as a solution for ULW implementation. A receiver system with a low power dissipation is discussed as well. The active antenna is optimized to operate at the noise level defined by the celestial emission in the frequency band 1 - 30 MHz. Field experiments with a prototype tripole antenna enabled estimates of the system noise temperature. They indicated that the proposed concept meets the requirements of a space-borne ULW array facility.
  • Solar radio type III bursts are believed to be the most sensitive signature of near-relativistic electron beam propagation in the corona. A solar radio type IIIb-III pair burst with fine frequency structures, observed by the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) with high temporal ($\sim10$ ms) and spectral (12.5 kHz) resolutions at 30 - 80 MHz, is presented. The observations show that the type III burst consists of many striae, which have a frequency scale of about 0.1 MHz in both the fundamental (plasma) and the harmonic (double plasma) emission. We investigate the effects of background density fluctuations based on the observation of striae structure to estimate the density perturbation in solar corona. It is found that the spectral index of the density fluctuation spectrum is about $-1.7$, and the characteristic spatial scale of the density perturbation is around $700$ km. This spectral index is very close to a Kolmogorov turbulence spectral index of $-5/3$, consistent with a turbulent cascade. This fact indicates that the coronal turbulence may play the important role of modulating the time structures of solar radio type III bursts, and the fine structure of radio type III bursts could provide a useful and unique tool to diagnose the turbulence in the solar corona.
  • Sausage modes that are axisymmetric fast magnetoacoustic oscillations of solar coronal loops are characterized by variation of the plasma density and magnetic field, and hence cause time variations of the electron plasma frequency and cyclotron frequency. The latter parameters determine the condition for the double plasma resonance (DPR), which is responsible for the appearance of zebra-pattern (ZP) structures in time spectra of solar type IV radio bursts. We perform numerical simulations of standing and propagating sausage oscillations in a coronal loop modeled as a straight, field-aligned plasma slab, and determine the time variation of the DPR layer locations. Instant values of the plasma density and magnetic field at the DPR layers allowed us to construct skeletons of the time variation of ZP stripes in radio spectra. In the presence of a sausage oscillation, the ZP structures are shown to have characteristic wiggles with the time period prescribed by the sausage oscillation. Standing and propagating sausage oscillations are found to have different signatures in ZP patterns. We conclude that ZP wiggles can be used for the detection of short-period sausage oscillations and the exploitation of their seismological potential.
  • The variations of the 3-D coronal magnetic fields associated with the X3.4-class flare of active region 10930 are studied in this paper. The coronal magnetic field data are reconstructed from the photospheric vector magnetograms obtained by the Hinode satellite and using the nonlinear force-free field extrapolation method developed in our previous work (He et al., 2011). The 3-D force-free factor $\alpha$, 3-D current density, and 3-D magnetic energy density are employed to analyze the coronal data. The distributions of $\alpha$ and current density reveal a prominent magnetic connectivity with strong negative $\alpha$ values and strong current density before the flare. This magnetic connectivity extends along the main polarity inversion line and is found to be totally broken after the flare. The distribution variation of magnetic energy density reveals the redistribution of magnetic energy before and after the flare. In the lower space of the modeling volume the increase of magnetic energy dominates, and in the higher space the decrease of energy dominates. The comparison with the flare onset imaging observation exhibits that the breaking site of the magnetic connectivity and site with the highest values of energy density increase coincide with the location of flare initial eruption. We conclude that a cramped positive $\alpha$ region appearing in the photosphere causes the breaking of the magnetic connectivity. A scenario for flare initial eruption is proposed in which the Lorentz force acting on the isolated electric current at the magnetic connectivity breaking site lifts the associated plasmas and causes the initial ejection.
  • After more than half a century of community support related to the science of "solar activity'', IAU's Commission 10 was formally discontinued in 2015, to be succeeded by C.E2 with the same area of responsibility. On this occasion, we look back at the growth of the scientific disciplines involved around the world over almost a full century. Solar activity and fields of research looking into the related physics of the heliosphere continue to be vibrant and growing, with currently over 2,000 refereed publications appearing per year from over 4,000 unique authors, publishing in dozens of distinct journals and meeting in dozens of workshops and conferences each year. The size of the rapidly growing community and of the observational and computational data volumes, along with the multitude of connections into other branches of astrophysics, pose significant challenges; aspects of these challenges are beginning to be addressed through, among others, the development of new systems of literature reviews, machine-searchable archives for data and publications, and virtual observatories. As customary in these reports, we highlight some of the research topics that have seen particular interest over the most recent triennium, specifically active-region magnetic fields, coronal thermal structure, coronal seismology, flares and eruptions, and the variability of solar activity on long time scales. We close with a collection of developments, discoveries, and surprises that illustrate the range and dynamics of the discipline.
  • Observations show that there is a proton spectral "break" with E$_{break}$ at 1-10MeV in some large CME-driven shocks. Theoretical model usually attribute this phenomenon to a diffusive shock acceleration. However, the underlying physics of the shock acceleration still remains uncertain. Although previous numerical models can hardly predict this "break" due to either high computational expense or shortcomings of current models, the present paper focuses on simulating this energy spectrum in converged two shocks by Monte Carlo numerical method. Considering the Dec 13 2006 CME-driven shock interaction with an Earth bow shock, we examine whether the energy spectral "break" could occur on an interaction between two shocks. As result, we indeed obtain the maximum proton energy up to 10MeV, which is the premise to investigate the existence of the energy spectral "break". Unexpectedly, we further find a proton spectral "break" appears distinctly at the energy $\sim$5MeV.
  • The measurement of positions and sizes of radio sources in the observations of solar radio spectral fine structures in an M6.5 flare on April 11, 2013 were observed simultaneously by several radio instruments at four different observatories: Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometers at Huairou (SBRS/Huairou), Ondrejov Radio spectrograph in the Czech Republic (ORSC/Ondrejov), Badary Broadband Microwave spectropolarimeter (BMS/Irkutsk), and spectrograph/IZMIRAN (Moscow, Troitsk). The fine structures include microwave zebra patterns (ZP), fast pulsations, and fibers. They were observed during the flare brightening located at the tops of a loop arcade. The dynamics of the polarization was associated with the motion of the flare exciter, which was observed in EUV images at 171A and 131A (SDO/AIA). Combining magnetograms observed by the SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) with the homologous assumption of EUV flare brightening and ZP bursts, we deduced that the observed ZPs correspond to the ordinary radio emission mode. However, future analysis needs to verify the assumption that zebra radio sources are really related to a closed magnetic loop, and are located at lower heights in the solar atmosphere than the source of pulsations.
  • Observations from multiple spacecraft show that there are energy spectral "breaks" at 1-10MeV in some large CME-driven shocks. However, numerical models can hardly simulate this property due to high computational expense. The present paper focuses on analyzing these energy spectral "breaks" by Monte Carlo particle simulations of an isolated CME-driven shock. Taking the Dec 14 2006 CME-driven shock as an example, we investigate the formation of this energy spectral property. For this purpose, we apply different values for the scattering time in our isolated shock model to obtain the highest energy "tails", which can potentially exceed the "break" energy range. However, we have not found the highest energy "tails" beyond the "break" energy range, but instead find that the highest energy "tails" reach saturation near the range of energy at 5MeV. So, we believe that there exists an energy spectral "cut off" in an isolated shock. If there is no interaction with another shock, there would not be formation of the energy spectral "break" property.
  • This work presents a systematic investigation of the influence of weather conditions on the calibration errors by using Gaussian fitness, least chi-square linear fitness and wavelet transform to analyze the calibration coefficients from observations of the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometers (at frequency bands of 1.0-2.0 GHz, 2.6-3.8 GHz, and 5.2-7.6 GHz) during 1997-2007. We found that calibration coefficients are influenced by the local air temperature. Considering the temperature correction, the calibration error will reduce by about $10\%-20\%$ at 2800 MHz. Based on the above investigation and the calibration corrections, we further study the radio emission of the quiet-Sun by using an appropriate hybrid model of the quiet-Sun atmosphere. The results indicate that the numerical flux of the hybrid model is much closer to the observation flux than that of other ones.
  • Chinese Spectral Radio Heliograph (CSRH) is an advanced aperture synthesis solar radio heliograph, developed by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences independently. It consists of 100 reflector antennas, which are grouped into two antenna arrays (CSRH-I and CSRH-II) for low and high frequency bands respectively. The frequency band of CSRH-I is 0.4-2GHz and for CSRH-II, the frequency band is 2-15GHz. In the antenna and feed system, CSRH uses an Eleven feed to receive signals coming from the Sun, the radiation pattern with lower side lobe and back lobe of the feed is well radiated. The characteristics of gain G and antenna noise temperature T effect the quality of solar radio imaging. For CSRH, measured G is larger than 60 dBi and $ T $ is less than 120K, after CSRH-I was established, we have successfully captured a solar radio burst between 1.2-1.6GHz on November 12, 2010 through this instrument and this event was confirmed through the observation of Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS) at 2.84GHz and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). In addition, an image obtained from CSRH-I clearly reveals the profile of the solar radio burst. The other observational work is the imaging of Fengyun-2E geosynchronous satellite which is assumed to be a point source. This data processing method indicates that, the method of deleting errors about dirty image could be used for processing other surface sources.
  • This paper presents an overview of results obtained during the CAWSES II period on the short term variability of the Sun and how it affects the near Earth space environment. CAWSES II was planned to examine the behavior of the solar terrestrial system as the solar activity climbed to its maximum phase in solar cycle 24. After a deep minimum following cycle 23, the Sun climbed to a very weak maximum in terms of the sunspot number in cycle 24 (MiniMax24), so many of the results presented here refer to this weak activity in comparison with cycle 23. The short term variability that has immediate consequence to Earth and geospace manifests as solar eruptions from closed field regions and high speed streams from coronal holes. Both electromagnetic (flares) and mass emissions (coronal mass ejections, CMEs) are involved in solar eruptions, while coronal holes result in high speed streams that collide with slow wind forming the so called corotating interaction regions (CIRs). Fast CMEs affect Earth via leading shocks accelerating energetic particles and creating large geomagnetic storms. CIRs and their trailing high speed streams (HSSs), on the other hand, are responsible for recurrent small geomagnetic storms and extended (days) of auroral zone activity, respectively. The latter lead to the acceleration of relativistic magnetospheric killer electrons. One of the major consequences of the weak solar activity is the altered physical state of the heliosphere that has serious implications for the shock-driving and storm causing properties of CMEs. Finally, a discussion is presented on extreme space weather events prompted by the 2012 July 23 super storm event that occurred on the backside of the Sun. Many of these studies were enabled by the simultaneous availability of remote-sensing and in situ observations from multiple vantage points with respect to the Sun Earth line.
  • Radiobursts exibiting fine structure observed over two years during the rising phase of Cycle 24 by the SBRS are analyzed. In five events zebra structure, various fiber bursts and fast pulsations were observed. Events on 15 and 24 February 2011 are of the greatest interest. The polarization of radio emission in all three cases is related to the ordinary wave mode of radio emission.Almost all events in the microwave range contain superfine structure. It is possible that each type of fine structure is excited by the same mechanism, and the broad variety of events is related to the dynamics of flare processes.
  • Solar Optical Telescope onboard Hinode observed a sunspot (AR 11836) with two light bridges (LBs) on 31 Aug 2013. We analysed a 2-hour \ion{Ca}{2} H emission intensity data set and detected strong 5-min oscillation power on both LBs and in the inner penumbra. The time-distance plot reveals that 5-min oscillation phase does not vary significantly along the thin bridge, indicating that the oscillations are likely to originate from the underneath. The slit taken along the central axis of the wide light bridge exhibits a standing wave feature. However, at the centre of the wide bridge, the 5-min oscillation power is found to be stronger than at its sides. Moreover, the time-distance plot across the wide bridge exhibits a herringbone pattern that indicates a counter-stream of two running waves originated at the bridge sides. Thus, the 5-min oscillations on the wide bridge also resemble the properties of running penumbral waves. The 5-min oscillations are suppressed in the umbra, while the 3-min oscillations occupy all three cores of the sunspot's umbra, separated by the LBs. The 3-min oscillations were found to be in phase at both sides of the LBs. It may indicate that either LBs do not affect umbral oscillations, or umbral oscillations at different umbral cores share the same source. Also, it indicates that LBs are rather shallow objects situated in the upper part of the umbra. We found that umbral flashes follow the life cycles of umbral oscillations with much larger amplitudes. They cannot propagate across LBs. Umbral flashes dominate the 3-min oscillation power within each core, however, they do not disrupt the phase of umbral oscillation.
  • Microwave emission with spectral zebra pattern structures (ZPs) is observed frequently in solar flares and the Crab pulsar. The previous observations show that ZP is only a structure overlapped on the underlying broadband continuum with slight increments and decrements. This work reports an extremely unusual strong ZP burst occurring just at the beginning of a solar flare observed simultaneously by two radio telescopes located in China and Czech Republic and by the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) telescope on board NASA's satellite Solar Dynamics Observatory on 2013 April 11. It is a very short and super strong explosion whose intensity exceeds several times that of the underlying flaring broadband continuum emission, lasting for just 18 s. EUV images show that the flare starts from several small flare bursting points (FBPs). There is a sudden EUV flash with extra enhancement in one of these FBPs during the ZP burst. Analysis indicates that the ZP burst accompanying EUV flash is an unusual explosion revealing a strong coherent process with rapid particle acceleration, violent energy release, and fast plasma heating simultaneously in a small region with short duration just at the beginning of the flare.
  • We present simulations for interferometer arrays in Earth orbit and on the lunar surface to guide the design and optimization of space-based Ultra-Long Wavelength missions, such as those of China's Chang'E program. We choose parameters and present simulations using simulated data to identify inter-dependencies and constraints on science and engineering parameters. A regolith model is created for the lunar surface array simulation, the results show that the lunar regolith will have an undesirable effect on the observation. We estimate data transmission requirement, calculate sensitivities for both cases, and discuss the trade-off between brightness temperature sensitivity and angular resolution for the Earth orbit array case.
  • Quasi-periodic wiggles of microwave zebra pattern structures with period range from about 0.5 s to 1.5 s are found in a X-class solar flare on 2006 December 13 at the 2.6-3.8 GHz with the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Huairou). Periodogram and correlation analysis show that the wiggles have two-three significant periodicities and almost in phase between stripes at different frequency. The Alfven speed estimated from the zebra pattern structures is about 700 Km/s. We obtain the spatial size of the waveguiding plasma structure to be about 1 Mm with the detected period of about 1 s. It suggests the ZP wiggles can be associated with the fast mag- netoacoustic oscillations in the flaring active region. The lack of a significant phase shift between wiggles of different stripes suggests that the ZP wiggles are caused by a standing sausage oscillation.
  • A 3-D coronal magnetic field is reconstructed for NOAA 11158 on Feb 14, 2011. A GPU-accelerated direct boundary integral equation (DBIE) method is implemented. This is about 1000 times faster than the original DBIE used on solar NLFFF modeling. Using the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram as the bottom boundary condition, the reconstructed magnetic field lines are compared with the projected EUV loop structures from different views three-dimensionally by SDO/AIA and STEREO A/B spacecraft simultaneously for the first time. They show very good agreement so that the topological configurations of the magnetic fields can be analyzed, thus its role in the flare process of the active region can be better understood. A quantitative comparison with some stereoscopically reconstructed coronal loops shows that the present averaged misalignment angles are at the same order as the state-of-the-art results obtained with reconstructed coronal loops as prescribed conditions and better than other NLFFF methods. It is found that the observed coronal loop structures can be grouped into bundles of closed and open loops with some central bright coronal loops around the polarity inversion line (PIL). The reconstructed highly-shearing magnetic field lines agree very well with the low-lying S-shaped filament channel along PIL. They are in a pivot position to all other surrounding coronal structures, and a group of electric current lines co-aligned with the central bright EUV loops overlying the filament channel is also obtained. This central lower-lying magnetic field loop system must have played a key role in powering the flare. It should be noted that while a strand-like coronal feature along PIL may be related to the filament, one cannot simply attribute all the coronal bright features along PIL to manifestation of the filament without any stereoscopically information. It shows that DBIE is rigorous and effective.
  • The morphologic properties of the magnetic networks during Carrington Rotations (CR) 1955 to 2091 (from 1999 to 2010) have been analyzed by applying the watershed algorithm to magnetograms observed by the Michelson Doppler Interferometer (MDI) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. We find that the average area of magnetic cells on the solar surface at lower latitudes (within +-50 degree) are smaller than those at higher latitudes (beyond +-50 degree). Statistical analysis of these data indicates that the magnetic networks are of fractal in nature, and the average fractal dimension is D_f = 1.253+-0.011. We also find that both the fractal dimension and the size of the magnetic networks are anti-correlated with the sunspot area. This is perhaps because a strong magnetic field can suppress spatially modulated oscillation, compress the boundaries of network cells, leading to smoother cell boundaries. The fractal dimension of the cell deviates that predicted from an isobar of Kolmogorov homogeneous turbulence.
  • It is generally considered that the emission of microwave zebra pattern (ZP) structures requires high density and high temperatures, which is similar to the situation of the flaring region where primary energy releases. Therefore, the parameters analysis of ZPs may reveal the physical conditions of the flaring source region. This work investigates the variations of 74 microwave ZP structures observed by Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Huairou) at 2.6-3.8 GHz in 9 solar flares, and found that the ratio between the plasma density scale height LN and the magnetic field scale height LB in emission source displays a tendency of decrease during the flaring processes. The ratio LN/LB is about 3-5 before the maximum of flares. It decreases to about 2 after the maximum. The detailed analysis of three typical X-class flares implied that the variation of LN/LB during the flaring process is most likely due to the topological changes of the magnetic field in the flaring source region, and the step-wise decrease of LN/LB possibly reflects the magnetic field relaxation relative to the plasma density when the flaring energy released. This result may also constrain the solar flare modeling to some extent.
  • Observations of the interplanetary shock provide us with strong evidence of particle acceleration to multi-MeV energies, even up to GeV energy, in a solar flare or coronal mass ejection (CME). Diffusive shock acceleration is an efficient mechanism for particle acceleration. For investigating the shock structure, the energy injection and energy spectrum of a CME-driven shock, we perform dynamical Monte Carlo simulation of the 14-Dec-2006 CME-driven shock using an anisotropic scattering law. The simulated results of the shock fine structure, particle injection, and energy spectrum are presented. We find that our simulation results give a good fit to the observations from multiple spacecraft.
  • Based on the analysis of the microwave observations at frequency of 2.60 -- 3.80 GHz in a solar X1.3 flare event observed at Solar Broadband RadioSpectrometer in Huairou (SBRS/Huairou) on 2005 July 30, an interesting reversed drifting quasi-periodic pulsating structure (R-DPS) is confirmed. The R-DPS is mainly composed of two drifting pulsating components: one is a relatively slow very short-period pulsation (VSP) with period of about 130 -- 170 ms, the other is a relatively fast VSP with period of about 70 -- 80 ms. The R-DPS has a weak left-handed circular polarization. Based on the synthetic investigations of Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imaging (RHESSI) hard X-ray, Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) soft X-ray observation, and magnetic field extrapolation, we suggest the R-DPS possibly reflects flaring dynamic processes of the emission source regions.
  • Although diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) could be simulated by some well-established models, the assumption of the injection rate from the thermal particles to the superthermal population is still a contentious problem. But in the self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations, because of the prescribed scattering law instead of the assumption of the injected function, hence particle injection rate is intrinsically defined by the prescribed scattering law. We expect to examine the correlation of the energy injection with the prescribed multiple scattering angular distributions. According to the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions, the energy injection and the losses in the simulation system can directly decide the shock energy spectrum slope. By the simulations performed with multiple scattering law in the dynamical Monte Carlo model, the energy injection and energy loss functions are obtained. As results, the case applying anisotropic scattering law produce a small energy injection and large energy losses leading to a soft shock energy spectrum, the case applying isotropic scattering law produce a large energy injection and small energy losses leading to a hard shock energy spectrum.
  • According to the shock jump conditions, the total fluid's mass, momentum, and energy should be conserved in the entire simulation box. We perform the dynamical Monte Carlo simulations with the multiple scattering law for energy analysis. The various energy functions of time are obtained by monitoring the total particles' mass, momentum, and energy in the simulation box. In conclusion, the energy analysis indicates that the smaller energy losses in the prescribed scattering law are, the harder the energy spectrum produced is.
  • Zebra pattern structure (ZP) is the most intriguing fine structure on the dynamic spectrograph of solar microwave burst. On 15 February 2011, there erupts an X2.2 flare event on the solar disk, it is the first X-class flare since the solar Schwabe cycle 24. It is interesting that there are several microwave ZPs observed by the Chinese Solar Broadband Radiospectrometer (SBRS/Huairou) at frequency of 6.40 ~ 7.00 GHz (ZP1), 2.60 ~ 2.75 GHz (ZP2), and the Yunnan Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Yunnan) at frequency of 1.04 ~ 1.13 GHz (ZP3). The most important phenomena is the unusual high-frequency ZP structure (ZP1, up to 7.00 GHz) occurred in the early rising phase of the flare, and there are two ZP structure (ZP2, ZP3) with relative low frequencies occurred in the decay phase of the flare. By scrutinizing the current prevalent theoretical models of ZP structure generations, and comparing their estimated magnetic field strengths in the corresponding source regions, we suggest that the double plasma resonance model should be the most possible one for explaining the formation of microwave ZPs, which may derive the magnetic field strengths as about 230 - 345 G, 126 - 147 G, and 23 - 26 G in the source regions of ZP1, ZP2, and ZP3, respectively.
  • We independently develop a simulation code following the previous dynamical Monte Carlo simulation of the diffusive shock acceleration under the isotropic scattering law during the scattering process, and the same results are obtained. Since the same results test the validity of the dynamical Monte Carlo method for simulating a collisionless shock, we extend the simulation toward including an anisotropic scattering law for further developing this dynamical Monte Carlo simulation. Under this extended anisotropic scattering law, a Gaussian distribution function is used to describe the variation of scattering angles in the particle's local frame. As a result, we obtain a series of different shock structures and evolutions in terms of the standard deviation values of the given Gaussian scattering angular distributions. We find that the total energy spectral index increases as the standard deviation value of the scattering angular distribution increases, but the subshock's energy spectral index decreases as the standard deviation value of the scattering angular distribution increases.