• We derive constraints on Lagrangian embeddings in completions of certain stable symplectic fillings with semisimple symplectic cohomologies. Manifolds with these properties can be constructed by generalizing the boundary connected sum operation to our setting, and are related to certain birational surgeries like blow-downs and flips. As a consequence, there are many non-toric (non-compact) monotone symplectic manifolds whose wrapped Fukaya categories are proper.
  • A twin Lagrangian fibration, originally introduced by Yau and the first author, is roughly a geometric structure consisting of two Lagrangian fibrations whose fibers intersect with each other cleanly. In this paper, we show the existence of twin Lagrangian fibrations on certain symplectic manifolds whose mirrors are fibered by rigid analytic cycles. Using family Floer theory in the sense of Fukaya and Abouzaid, these twin Lagrangian fibrations are shown to be induced from fibrations by rigid analytic subvarieties on the mirror. As additional evidences, we discuss two simple applications of our constructions.
  • Cosmic background neutrinos have a large velocity dispersion, which causes the evolution of long-wavelength density perturbations to depend on scale. This scale-dependent growth leads to the well-known suppression in the linear theory matter power spectrum that is used to probe neutrino mass. In this paper, we study the impact of long-wavelength density perturbations on small-scale structure formation. By performing separate universe simulations where the long-wavelength mode is absorbed into the local expansion, we measure the responses of the cold dark matter (CDM) power spectrum and halo mass function, which correspond to the squeezed-limit bispectrum and halo bias. We find that the scale-dependent evolution of the long-wavelength modes causes these quantities to depend on scale and provide simple expressions to model them in terms of scale and the amount of massive neutrinos. Importantly, this scale-dependent bias reduces the suppression in the linear halo power spectrum due to massive neutrinos by 13 and 26% for objects of bias $\bar{b}=2$ and $\bar{b} \gg1$, respectively. We demonstrate with high statistical significance that the scale-dependent halo bias ${\it cannot}$ be modeled by the CDM and neutrino density transfer functions at the time when the halos are identified. This reinforces the importance of the temporal nonlocality of structure formation, especially when the growth is scale dependent.
  • Can a robot grasp an unknown object without seeing it? In this paper, we present a tactile-sensing based approach to this challenging problem of grasping novel objects without prior knowledge of their location or physical properties. Our key idea is to combine touch based object localization with tactile based re-grasping. To train our learning models, we created a large-scale grasping dataset, including more than 30 RGB frames and over 2.8 million tactile samples from 7800 grasp interactions of 52 objects. To learn a representation of tactile signals, we propose an unsupervised auto-encoding scheme, which shows a significant improvement of 4-9% over prior methods on a variety of tactile perception tasks. Our system consists of two steps. First, our touch localization model sequentially 'touch-scans' the workspace and uses a particle filter to aggregate beliefs from multiple hits of the target. It outputs an estimate of the object's location, from which an initial grasp is established. Next, our re-grasping model learns to progressively improve grasps with tactile feedback based on the learned features. This network learns to estimate grasp stability and predict adjustment for the next grasp. Re-grasping thus is performed iteratively until our model identifies a stable grasp. Finally, we demonstrate extensive experimental results on grasping a large set of novel objects using tactile sensing alone. Furthermore, when applied on top of a vision-based policy, our re-grasping model significantly boosts the overall accuracy by 10.6%. We believe this is the first attempt at learning to grasp with only tactile sensing and without any prior object knowledge.
  • Image-language matching tasks have recently attracted a lot of attention in the computer vision field. These tasks include image-sentence matching, i.e., given an image query, retrieving relevant sentences and vice versa, and region-phrase matching or visual grounding, i.e., matching a phrase to relevant regions. This paper investigates two-branch neural networks for learning the similarity between these two data modalities. We propose two network structures that produce different output representations. The first one, referred to as an embedding network, learns an explicit shared latent embedding space with a maximum-margin ranking loss and novel neighborhood constraints. Compared to standard triplet sampling, we perform improved neighborhood sampling that takes neighborhood information into consideration while constructing mini-batches. The second network structure, referred to as a similarity network, fuses the two branches via element-wise product and is trained with regression loss to directly predict a similarity score. Extensive experiments show that our networks achieve high accuracies for phrase localization on the Flickr30K Entities dataset and for bi-directional image-sentence retrieval on Flickr30K and MSCOCO datasets.
  • We report a systematic experimental and numerical study of the expansion of ultra-cold Rydberg plasmas. Specifically, we have measured the asymptotic expansion velocities, $v_0$, of ultra-cold neutral plasmas (UNPs) which evolve from cold, dense samples of Rydberg rubidium atoms using ion time-of-flight spectroscopy. From this, we have obtained values for the effective initial plasma electron temperature, $T_{e,0} = m_{ion} v_0^2/k_B$ (where $m_{ion}$ is the Rb$^+$ ion mass), as a function of the original Rydberg atom density and binding energy, $E_{b,i}$. We have also simulated numerically the interaction of UNPs with a large reservoir of Rydberg atoms to obtain data to compare with our experimental results. We find that for Rydberg atom densities in the range $10^7 - 10^9$ cm$^{-3}$, for states with principal quantum number $n > 40$, $T_{e,0}$ is insensitive to the initial ionization mechanism which seeds the plasma. In addition, the quantity $k_B \, T_{e,0}$ is strongly correlated with the fraction of atoms which ionize, and is in the range $0.6 \times |E_{b,i}| \lesssim k_BT_{e,0} \lesssim 2.5 \times |E_{b,i}|$. On the other hand, plasmas from Rydberg samples with $n \lesssim 40$ evolve with no significant additional ionization of the remaining atoms once a threshold number of ions has been established. The dominant interaction between the plasma electrons and the Rydberg atoms is one in which the atoms are deexcited, a heating process for electrons that competes with adiabatic cooling to establish an equilibrium where $T_{e,0}$ is determined by their Coulomb coupling parameter, $\Gamma_e \sim 0.01$.
  • We have measured the asymptotic expansion velocities of ultra-cold plasmas (UNPs) which evolve from cold, dense, samples of Rydberg rubidium atoms using ion time-of-flight spectroscopy. From this, we have obtained values for the initial plasma electron temperature as functions of the original Rydberg atom density and binding energy. Our results show that the electron temperature is determined principally by the plasma environment when the UNP decouples from the Rydberg atoms, which occurs when the plasma electrons become too cold to ionize the remaining Rydberg population. Furthermore, the dependence of the electron temperature on Rydberg atom density gives strong indirect evidence for the existence of a bottleneck in the spectrum of Rydberg states that coexist with a cold plasma.
  • As a major source of cosmological information, galaxy clustering is susceptible to long-wavelength density and tidal fluctuations. These long modes modulate the growth and expansion rate of local structures, shifting them in both amplitude and scale. These effects are often named the growth and dilation effects, respectively. In particular the dilation shifts the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak and breaks the assumption of the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test. This cannot be removed with reconstruction techniques because the effect originates from long modes outside the survey. In redshift space, the long modes generate a large-scale radial peculiar velocity that affects the redshift-space distortion (RSD) signal. We compute the redshift-space response functions of the galaxy power spectrum to long density and tidal modes at leading order in perturbation theory, including both the growth and dilation terms. We validate these response functions against measurements from simulated galaxy mock catalogs. As one application, long density and tidal modes beyond the scale of a survey correlate various observables leading to an excess error known as the super-sample covariance, and thus weaken their constraining power. We quantify the super-sample effect on BAO, AP, and RSD measurements, and study its impact on current and future surveys.
  • Data outsourcing allows data owners to keep their data at untrusted clouds that do not ensure the privacy of data and/or computations. One useful framework for fault-tolerant data processing in a distributed fashion is MapReduce, which was developed for trusted private clouds. This paper presents algorithms for data outsourcing based on Shamir's secret-sharing scheme and for executing privacy-preserving SQL queries such as count, selection including range selection, projection, and join while using MapReduce as an underlying programming model. The proposed algorithms prevent the untrusted cloud to know the database or the query while also preventing output size and access-pattern attacks. Interestingly, our algorithms do not need the database owner, which only creates and distributes secret-shares once, to be involved to answer any query, and hence, the database owner also cannot learn the query. We evaluate the efficiency of the algorithms on parameters: (i) the number of communication rounds (between a user and a cloud), (ii) the total amount of bit flow (between a user and a cloud), and (iii) the computational load at the user-side and the cloud-side.
  • Edge detection has made significant progress with the help of deep Convolutional Networks (ConvNet). ConvNet based edge detectors approached human level performance on standard benchmarks. We provide a systematical study of these detector outputs, and show that they failed to accurately localize edges, which can be adversarial for tasks that require crisp edge inputs. In addition, we propose a novel refinement architecture to address the challenging problem of learning a crisp edge detector using ConvNet. Our method leverages a top-down backward refinement pathway, and progressively increases the resolution of feature maps to generate crisp edges. Our results achieve promising performance on BSDS500, surpassing human accuracy when using standard criteria, and largely outperforming state-of-the-art methods when using more strict criteria. We further demonstrate the benefit of crisp edge maps for estimating optical flow, generating object proposals and semantic segmentation. In addition, the proposed refinement architecture can be easily generalized to saliency detection task, achieving state-of-art results on five commonly used saliency detection benchmark.
  • Long-wavelength matter inhomogeneities contain cleaner information on the nature of primordial perturbations as well as the physics of the early universe. The large-scale coherent overdensity and tidal force, not directly observable for a finite-volume galaxy survey, are both related to the Hessian of large-scale gravitational potential and therefore of equal importance. We show that the coherent tidal force causes a homogeneous anisotropic distortion of the observed distribution of galaxies in all three directions, perpendicular and parallel to the line-of-sight direction. This effect mimics the redshift-space distortion signal of galaxy peculiar velocities, as well as a distortion by the Alcock-Paczynski effect. We quantify its impact on the redshift-space power spectrum to the leading order, and discuss its importance for the ongoing and upcoming galaxy surveys.
  • Measurements of line-of-sight dependent clustering via the galaxy power spectrum's multipole moments constitute a powerful tool for testing theoretical models in large-scale structure. Recent work shows that this measurement, including a moving line-of-sight, can be accelerated using Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs) by decomposing the Legendre polynomials into products of Cartesian vectors. Here, we present a faster, optimal means of using FFTs for this measurement. We avoid redundancy present in the Cartesian decomposition by using a spherical harmonic decomposition of the Legendre polynomials. Consequently, our method is substantially faster: a given multipole of order $\ell$ requires only $2\ell+1$ FFTs rather than the $(\ell+1)(\ell+2)/2$ FFTs of the Cartesian approach. For the hexadecapole ($\ell = 4$), this translates to $40\%$ fewer FFTs, with increased savings for higher $\ell$. The reduction in wall-clock time enables the calculation of finely-binned wedges in $P(k,\mu)$, obtained by computing multipoles up to a large $\ell_{\rm max}$ and combining them. This transformation has a number of advantages. We demonstrate that by using non-uniform bins in $\mu$, we can isolate plane-of-sky (angular) systematics to a narrow bin at $\mu \simeq 0$ while eliminating the contamination from all other bins. We also show that the covariance matrix of clustering wedges binned uniformly in $\mu$ becomes ill-conditioned when combining multipoles up to large values of $\ell_{\rm max}$, but that the problem can be avoided with non-uniform binning. As an example, we present results using $\ell_{\rm max}=16$, for which our procedure requires a factor of 3.4 fewer FFTs than the Cartesian method, while removing the first $\mu$ bin leads only to a 7% increase in statistical error on $f \sigma_8$, as compared to a 54% increase with $\ell_{\rm max}=4$.
  • By absorbing fluctuations into a local background, separate universe simulations provide a powerful technique to characterize the response of small-scale observables to the long-wavelength density fluctuations, for example those of the power spectrum and halo mass function which lead to the squeezed-limit $n$-point function and halo bias, respectively. Using quintessence dark energy as the paradigmatic example, we extend these simulation techniques to cases where non-gravitational forces in other sectors establish a Jeans scale across which the growth of density fluctuations becomes scale dependent. By characterizing the separate universes with matching background expansion histories, we show that the power spectrum and mass function responses depend on whether the long-wavelength mode is above or below the Jeans scale. Correspondingly, the squeezed bispectrum and halo bias also become scale dependent. Models of bias that are effectively local in the density field at a single epoch, initial or observed, cannot describe this effect which highlights the importance of temporal nonlocality in structure formation. Validated by these quintessence tests, our techniques are applicable to a wide range of models where the complex dynamics of additional fields affect the clustering of matter in the linear regime and it would otherwise be difficult to simulate their impact in the nonlinear regime.
  • The separate universe technique provides a means of establishing consistency relations between short wavelength observables and the long wavelength matter density fluctuations within which they evolve by absorbing the latter into the cosmological background. We extend it to cases where non-gravitational forces introduce a Jeans scale in other species like dynamical dark energy or massive neutrinos. The technique matches the synchronous gauge matter density fluctuations to the local expansion using the acceleration equation and accounts for the temporal nonlocality and scale dependence of the long wavelength response of small scale matter observables, e.g. the nonlinear power spectrum, halo abundance and the implied halo bias, and $N$-point correlation functions. Above the Jeans scale, the local Friedmann equation relates the expansion to real energy densities and a curvature that is constant in comoving coordinates. Below the Jeans scale, the curvature evolves and acts like a fake density component. In all cases, the matter evolution on small scales is correctly modeled as we illustrate using scalar field dark energy with adiabatic or isocurvature initial conditions across the Jeans scale set by its finite sound speed.
  • This paper proposes a method for learning joint embeddings of images and text using a two-branch neural network with multiple layers of linear projections followed by nonlinearities. The network is trained using a large margin objective that combines cross-view ranking constraints with within-view neighborhood structure preservation constraints inspired by metric learning literature. Extensive experiments show that our approach gains significant improvements in accuracy for image-to-text and text-to-image retrieval. Our method achieves new state-of-the-art results on the Flickr30K and MSCOCO image-sentence datasets and shows promise on the new task of phrase localization on the Flickr30K Entities dataset.
  • Data-driven approaches for edge detection have proven effective and achieve top results on modern benchmarks. However, all current data-driven edge detectors require manual supervision for training in the form of hand-labeled region segments or object boundaries. Specifically, human annotators mark semantically meaningful edges which are subsequently used for training. Is this form of strong, high-level supervision actually necessary to learn to accurately detect edges? In this work we present a simple yet effective approach for training edge detectors without human supervision. To this end we utilize motion, and more specifically, the only input to our method is noisy semi-dense matches between frames. We begin with only a rudimentary knowledge of edges (in the form of image gradients), and alternate between improving motion estimation and edge detection in turn. Using a large corpus of video data, we show that edge detectors trained using our unsupervised scheme approach the performance of the same methods trained with full supervision (within 3-5%). Finally, we show that when using a deep network for the edge detector, our approach provides a novel pre-training scheme for object detection.
  • Linear halo bias is the response of dark matter halo number density to a long wavelength fluctuation in the dark matter density. Using abundance matching between separate universe simulations which absorb the latter into a change in the background, we test the consistency relation between the change in a one point function, the halo mass function, and a two point function, the halo-matter cross correlation in the long wavelength limit. We find excellent agreement between the two at the $1-2\%$ level for average halo biases between $1 \lesssim \bar b_1 \lesssim 4$ and no statistically significant deviations at the $4-5\%$ level out to $\bar b_1 \approx 8$. Halo bias inferred assuming instead a universal mass function is significantly different and inaccurate at the 10\% level or more. The separate universe technique provides a way of calibrating linear halo bias efficiently for even highly biased rare halos in the $\Lambda$CDM model. Observational violation of the consistency relation would indicate new physics, e.g.~in the dark matter, dark energy or primordial non-Gaussianity sectors.
  • Cryogenic liquids, particularly liquid xenon and argon, are of interest as detector media for experiments in nuclear and particle physics. Here we present a new detector diagnostic technique using piezoelectric sensors to detect bubbling of the liquid. Bubbling can indicate locations of excess heat dissipation e.g., in immersed electronics. They can also interfere with normal event evolution by scattering of light or by interrupting the drift of ionization charge. In our test apparatus, four sensors are placed in the vacuum space of a double-walled dewar of liquid nitrogen and used to detect and locate a source of bubbling inside the liquid volume. Utilizing the differences in transmitted frequencies through the different media present in the experiment, we find that sound traveling in a direct path from the source to the sensor can be isolated with appropriate filtering. The location of the source is then reconstructed using the time difference of arrivals (TDOA) information. The reconstruction algorithm is shown to have a 95.8% convergence rate and reconstructed positions are self-consistent to an average +/-0.5cm around the mean in x, y, and z. Systematic effects are observed to cause errors in reconstruction when bubbles occur very close to the surfaces of the liquid volume.
  • When extracting cosmological information from power spectrum measurements, we must consider the impact of super-sample density fluctuations whose wavelengths are larger than the survey scale. These modes contribute to the mean density fluctuation $\delta_b$ in the survey and change the power spectrum in the same way as a change in the cosmological background. They can be simply included in cosmological parameter estimation and forecasts by treating $\delta_b$ as an additional cosmological parameter enabling efficient exploration of its impact. To test this approach, we consider here an idealized measurement of the matter power spectrum itself in the $\Lambda$CDM cosmology though our techniques can readily be extended to more observationally relevant statistics or other parameter spaces. Using sub-volumes of large-volume $N$-body simulations for power spectra measured with respect to either the global or local mean density, we verify that the minimum variance estimator of $\delta_b$ is both unbiased and has the predicted variance. Parameter degeneracies arise since the response of the matter power spectrum to $\delta_b$ and cosmological parameters share similar properties in changing the growth of structure and dilating the scale of features especially in the local case. For matter power spectrum measurements, these degeneracies can lead in certain cases to substantial error degradation and motivates future studies of specific cosmological observables such as galaxy clustering and weak lensing statistics with these techniques.
  • In this paper we provide an extensive evaluation of fixation prediction and salient object segmentation algorithms as well as statistics of major datasets. Our analysis identifies serious design flaws of existing salient object benchmarks, called the dataset design bias, by over emphasizing the stereotypical concepts of saliency. The dataset design bias does not only create the discomforting disconnection between fixations and salient object segmentation, but also misleads the algorithm designing. Based on our analysis, we propose a new high quality dataset that offers both fixation and salient object segmentation ground-truth. With fixations and salient object being presented simultaneously, we are able to bridge the gap between fixations and salient objects, and propose a novel method for salient object segmentation. Finally, we report significant benchmark progress on three existing datasets of segmenting salient objects
  • Using separate universe simulations, we accurately quantify super-sample covariance (SSC), the typically dominant sampling error for matter power spectrum estimators in a finite volume, which arises from the presence of super survey modes. By quantifying the power spectrum response to a background mode, this approach automatically captures the separate effects of beat coupling in the quasilinear regime, halo sample variance in the nonlinear regime and a new dilation effect which changes scales in the power spectrum coherently across the survey volume, including the baryon acoustic oscillation scale. It models these effects at typically the few percent level or better with a handful of small volume simulations for any survey geometry compared with directly using many thousands of survey volumes in a suite of large volume simulations. The stochasticity of the response is sufficiently small that in the quasilinear regime, SSC can be alternately included by fitting the mean density in the volume with these fixed templates in parameter estimation. We also test the halo model prescription and find agreement typically at better than the 10% level for the response.
  • We present measurements of the number density of voids in the dark matter distribution from a series of N-body simulations of a \Lambda CDM cosmology. We define voids as spherical regions of \rho_v = 0.2\rho_m around density minima in order to relate our results to the predicted abundances using the excursion set formalism. Using a linear underdensity of \delta_v = -2.7, from a spherical evolution model, we find that a volume conserving model, which does not conserve number density in the mapping from the linear to nonlinear regime, matches the measured abundance to within 16% for a range of void radii 1< r(Mpc/h)<15. This model fixes the volume fraction of the universe which is in voids and assumes that voids of a similar size merge as they expand by a factor of 1.7 to achieve a nonlinear density of \rho_v = 0.2\rho_m today. We find that the model of Sheth & van de Weygaert (2004) for the number density of voids greatly overpredicts the abundances over the same range of scales. We find that the volume conserving model works well at matching the number density of voids measured from the simulations at higher redshifts, z=0.5 and 1, as well as correctly predicting the abundances to within 25% in a simulation of a matter dominated \Omega_m = 1 universe. We examine the abundance of voids in the halo distribution and find fewer small, r<10 Mpc/h, voids and many more large, r>10 Mpc/h, voids compared to the dark matter. These results indicate that voids identified in the halo or galaxy distribution are related to the underlying void distribution in the dark matter in a complicated way which merits further study if voids are to be used as a precision probe of cosmology.
  • This expository paper contains a detailed introduction to some important works concerning the Gauss-Bonnet-Chern theorem. The study of this theorem has a long history dating back to Gauss's Theorema Egregium (Latin: Remarkable Theorem) and culminated in Chern's groundbreaking work [14] in 1944, which is a deep and wonderful application of Elie Cartan's formalism. The idea and tools in [14] have a great generalization and continue to produce important results till today. In this paper, we give four different proofs of the Gauss-Bonnet-Chern theorem on Riemannian manifolds, namely Chern's simple intrinsic proof, a topological proof, Mathai-Quillen's Thom form proof and McKean-Singer-Patodi's heat equation proof. These proofs are related with remarkable developments in differential geometry such as the Chern-Weil theory, theory of characteristic classes, Mathai-Quillen's formalism and the Atiyah-Singer index theorem. It is through these brilliant achievements the great importance and influence of Chern's insights and ideas are shown. Our purpose here is to use the Gauss- Bonnet-Chern theorem as a guide to expose the reader to some advanced topics in modern differential geometry.
  • We model the chameleon effect on cosmological statistics for the modified gravity f(R) model of cosmic acceleration. The chameleon effect, required to make the model compatible with local tests of gravity, reduces force enhancement as a function of the depth of the gravitational potential wells of collapsed structure and so is readily incorporated into a halo model by including parameters for the chameleon mass threshold and rapidity of transition. We show that the abundance of halos around the chameleon mass threshold are enhanced by both the merging from below and the lack of merging to larger masses. This property also controls the power spectrum in the nonlinear regime and we provide a description of the transition to the linear regime that is valid for a wide range of f(R) models.
  • In this note, we study a certain class of trigonometric series which is important in many problems. An unproved statement in Zygmund's book [5] will be proved and generalized. Further discussions based on this problem will also be made here.