• Penetrance, which plays a key role in genetic research, is defined as the proportion of individuals with the genetic variants (i.e., {genotype}) that cause a particular trait and who have clinical symptoms of the trait (i.e., {phenotype}). We propose a Bayesian semiparametric approach to estimate the cancer-specific age-at-onset penetrance in the presence of the competing risk of multiple cancers. We employ a Bayesian semiparametric competing risk model to model the duration until individuals in a high-risk group develop different cancers, and accommodate family data using family-wise likelihoods. We tackle the ascertainment bias arising when family data are collected through probands in a high-risk population in which disease cases are more likely to be observed. We apply the proposed method to a cohort of 186 families with Li-Fraumeni syndrome identified through probands with sarcoma treated at MD Anderson Cancer Center from 1944 to 1982.
  • We report the design, construction, and initial commissioning results of a large high pressure gaseous Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with Micromegas modules for charge readout. The detector vessel has an inner volume of about 600 L and an active volume of 270 L. At 10 bar operating pressure, the active volume contains about 20 kg of xenon gas and can image charged particle tracks. Drift electrons are collected by the charge readout plane, which accommodates a tessellation of seven Micromegas modules. Each of the Micromegas covers a square of 20 cm by 20 cm. A new type of Microbulk Micromegas is chosen for this application due to its good gain uniformity and low radioactive contamination. Initial commissioning results with 1 Micromegas module running with 1 bar argon and isobutane gas mixture and 5 bar xenon and trimethylamine (TMA) gas mixture are reported. We also recorded extended background tracks from cosmic ray events and highlighted the unique tracking feature of this gaseous TPC.
  • Searching for the Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (NLDBD) is now regarded as the topmost promising technique to explore the nature of neutrinos after the discovery of neutrino masses in oscillation experiments. PandaX-III (Particle And Astrophysical Xenon Experiment III) will search for the NLDBD of $^{136}$Xe at the China Jin Ping underground Laboratory (CJPL). In the first phase of the experiment, a high pressure gas Time Projection Chamber (TPC) will contain 200 kg, 90% $^{136}$Xe enriched gas operated at 10 bar. Fine pitch micro-pattern gas detector (Microbulk Micromegas) will be used at both ends of the TPC for the charge readout with a cathode in the middle. Charge signals can be used to reconstruct tracks of NLDBD events and provide good energy and spatial resolution. The detector will be immersed in a large water tank to ensure $\sim$5 m of water shielding in all directions. The second phase, a ton-scale experiment, will consist of five TPCs in the same water tank, with improved energy resolution and better control over backgrounds.
  • H$_3$S is believed to the most possible high-temperature superconducting ($T_{\text{c}}$) phase of hydrogen sulfide at $\sim$200 GPa. It's isotope substitution of hydrogen (H) by deuterium (D), however, shows an anomalous $T_{\text{c}}$ decrease of $\sim$100 K at 140 to 160 GPa, much larger than the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory prediction. Using ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD), we show that the nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) influence the structures of H$_3$S and D$_3$S differently at finite temperatures and the interval when H$_3$S possesses the symmetric high $T_{\text{c}}$ structure while D$_3$S does not is in agreement with, though their absolute values are lower than experiments. This is consistent with an earlier theoretical study using the stochastic self-consistent harmonic approximation method in descriptions of the nuclei at 0 K.The remaining discrepancy can be substantially improved when the electronic structures are calculated using a hybrid function. Our study presents a simple picture to interpret the isotope dependent of $T_{\text{c}}$ and emphasizes the quantum nature in the high-pressure hydrogen sulfide system.
  • A major practical impediment when implementing adaptive dose-finding designs is that the toxicity outcome used by the decision rules may not be observed shortly after the initiation of the treatment. To address this issue, we propose the data augmentation continual reassessment method (DA-CRM) for dose finding. By naturally treating the unobserved toxicities as missing data, we show that such missing data are nonignorable in the sense that the missingness depends on the unobserved outcomes. The Bayesian data augmentation approach is used to sample both the missing data and model parameters from their posterior full conditional distributions. We evaluate the performance of the DA-CRM through extensive simulation studies and also compare it with other existing methods. The results show that the proposed design satisfactorily resolves the issues related to late-onset toxicities and possesses desirable operating characteristics: treating patients more safely and also selecting the maximum tolerated dose with a higher probability. The new DA-CRM is illustrated with two phase I cancer clinical trials.
  • Interval designs are a class of phase I trial designs for which the decision of dose assignment is determined by comparing the observed toxicity rate at the current dose with a prespecified (toxicity tolerance) interval. If the observed toxicity rate is located within the interval, we retain the current dose; if the observed toxicity rate is greater than the upper boundary of the interval, we deescalate the dose; and if the observed toxicity rate is smaller than the lower boundary of the interval, we escalate the dose. The most critical issue for the interval design is choosing an appropriate interval so that the design has good operating characteristics. By casting dose finding as a Bayesian decision-making problem, we propose new flexible methods to select the interval boundaries so as to minimize the probability of inappropriate dose assignment for patients. We show, both theoretically and numerically, that the resulting optimal interval designs not only have desirable finite- and large-sample properties, but also are particularly easy to implement in practice. Compared to existing designs, the proposed (local) optimal design has comparable average performance, but a lower risk of yielding a poorly performing clinical trial.
  • Diffusion tensor imaging provides important information on tissue structure and orientation of fiber tracts in brain white matter in vivo. It results in diffusion tensors, which are $3\times3$ symmetric positive definite (SPD) matrices, along fiber bundles. This paper develops a functional data analysis framework to model diffusion tensors along fiber tracts as functional data in a Riemannian manifold with a set of covariates of interest, such as age and gender. We propose a statistical model with varying coefficient functions to characterize the dynamic association between functional SPD matrix-valued responses and covariates. We calculate weighted least squares estimators of the varying coefficient functions for the log-Euclidean metric in the space of SPD matrices. We also develop a global test statistic to test specific hypotheses about these coefficient functions and construct their simultaneous confidence bands. Simulated data are further used to examine the finite sample performance of the estimated varying coefficient functions. We apply our model to study potential gender differences and find a statistically significant aspect of the development of diffusion tensors along the right internal capsule tract in a clinical study of neurodevelopment.
  • Dyadic data are common in the social and behavioral sciences, in which members of dyads are correlated due to the interdependence structure within dyads. The analysis of longitudinal dyadic data becomes complex when nonignorable dropouts occur. We propose a fully Bayesian selection-model-based approach to analyze longitudinal dyadic data with nonignorable dropouts. We model repeated measures on subjects by a transition model and account for within-dyad correlations by random effects. In the model, we allow subject's outcome to depend on his/her own characteristics and measure history, as well as those of the other member in the dyad. We further account for the nonignorable missing data mechanism using a selection model in which the probability of dropout depends on the missing outcome. We propose a Gibbs sampler algorithm to fit the model. Simulation studies show that the proposed method effectively addresses the problem of nonignorable dropouts. We illustrate our methodology using a longitudinal breast cancer study.
  • We propose a new integrated phase I/II trial design to identify the most efficacious dose combination that also satisfies certain safety requirements for drug-combination trials. We first take a Bayesian copula-type model for dose finding in phase I. After identifying a set of admissible doses, we immediately move the entire set forward to phase II. We propose a novel adaptive randomization scheme to favor assigning patients to more efficacious dose-combination arms. Our adaptive randomization scheme takes into account both the point estimate and variability of efficacy. By using a moving reference to compare the relative efficacy among treatment arms, our method achieves a high resolution to distinguish different arms. We also consider groupwise adaptive randomization when efficacy is late-onset. We conduct extensive simulation studies to examine the operating characteristics of the proposed design, and illustrate our method using a phase I/II melanoma clinical trial.
  • Nuclear stopping in the heavy ion collisions over a beam energy range from SIS, AGS up to SPS is studied in the framework of the modified UrQMD transport model, in which mean field potentials of both formed and "pre-formed" hadrons (from string fragmentation) and medium modified nucleon-nucleon elastic cross sections are considered. It is found that the nuclear stopping is influenced by both the stiffness of the equation of state and the medium modifications of nucleon-nucleon cross sections at SIS energies. At the high SPS energies, the two-bump structure is shown in the experimental rapidity distribution of free protons, which can be understood with the consideration of the "pre-formed" hadron potentials.