• Childhood obesity is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in adulthood, leading to substantial healthcare cost. There is an urgent need to promote early prevention and develop an accompanying surveillance system. In this paper, we make use of electronic health records (EHRs) and construct a penalized multi-level generalized linear model. The model provides regular trend and outlier information simultaneously, both of which may be useful to raise public awareness and facilitate targeted intervention. Our strategy is to decompose the regional contribution in the model into smooth and sparse signals, where the characteristics of the signals are encouraged by the combination of fusion and sparse penalties imposed on the likelihood function. In addition, we introduce a weighting scheme to account for the missingness and potential non-representativeness arising from the EHRs data. We propose a novel alternating minimization algorithm, which is computationally efficient, easy to implement, and guarantees convergence. Simulation shows that the proposed method has a superior performance compared with traditional counterparts. Finally, we apply our method to the University of Wisconsin Population Health Information Exchange database.
  • Individualized treatment rules (ITRs) tailor treatments according to individual patient characteristics. They can significantly improve patient care and are thus becoming increasingly popular. The data collected during randomized clinical trials are often used to estimate the optimal ITRs. However, these trials are generally expensive to run, and, moreover, they are not designed to efficiently estimate ITRs. In this paper, we propose a cost-effective estimation method from an active learning perspective. In particular, our method recruits only the "most informative" patients (in terms of learning the optimal ITRs) from an ongoing clinical trial. Simulation studies and real-data examples show that our active clinical trial method significantly improves on competing methods. We derive risk bounds and show that they support these observed empirical advantages.