• Quantum communication has been successfully implemented in optical fibres and through free-space [1-3]. Fibre systems, though capable of fast key rates and low quantum bit error rates (QBERs), are impractical in communicating with destinations without an established fibre link [4]. Free-space quantum channels can overcome such limitations and reach long distances with the advent of satellite-to-ground links [5-8]. Shorter line-of-sight free-space links have also been realized for intra-city conditions [2, 9]. However, turbulence, resulting from local fluctuations in refractive index, becomes a major challenge by adding errors and losses [10]. Recently, an interest in investigating the possibility of underwater quantum channels has arisen, which could provide global secure communication channels among submersibles and boats [11-13]. Here, we investigate the effect of turbulence on an underwater quantum channel using twisted photons in outdoor conditions. We study the effect of turbulence on transmitted QBERs, and compare different QKD protocols in an underwater quantum channel showing the feasibility of high-dimensional encoding schemes. Our work may open the way for secure high-dimensional quantum communication between submersibles, and provides important input for potential submersibles-to-satellite quantum communication.
  • Entanglement swapping generates remote quantum correlations between particles that have not interacted and is the cornerstone of long-distance quantum communication, quantum networks, and fundamental tests of quantum science. In the context of spatial modes of light, high-dimensional entanglement provides an avenue to increase the bandwidth of quantum communications and provides more stringent limits for tests of quantum foundations. Here we simultaneously swap the entanglement of multiple orbital angular momentum states of light. The system is based on a degenerate filter that cannot distinguish between different anti-symmetric states, and thus entanglement swapping occurs for several thousand pairs of spatial light modes simultaneously.
  • Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) interference is demonstrated experimentally for entangled photon pairs in the Hermite-Gauss (HG) basis. We use two Dove prisms in one of the paths of the photons to manipulate the entangled quantum state that enters the HOM interferometer. It is demonstrated that, when entangled photon pairs are in a symmetric Bell state in the Laguerre-Gauss (LG) basis, then they will remain symmetric after decomposing them into the HG basis, thereby resulting in no coincidence events after the HOM interference. On the other hand, if the photon pairs are in an antisymmetric Bell state in the LG basis, then they will also be antisymmetric in the HG basis, thereby producing only coincidence events as a result of the HOM interference.
  • High-dimensional entanglement with spatial modes of light promises increased security and information capacity over quantum channels. Unfortunately, entanglement decays due to perturbations, corrupting quantum links which cannot be repaired without a tomography of the channel. Paradoxically, the channel tomography itself is not possible without a working link. Here we overcome this problem with a robust approach to characterising quantum channels by means of classical light. Using free-space communication in a turbulent atmosphere as an example, we show that the state evolution of classically entangled degrees of freedom is equivalent to that of quantum entangled pho- tons, thus providing new physical insights into the notion of classical entanglement. The analysis of quantum channels by means of classical light in real time unravels stochastic dynamics in terms of pure state trajectories and thus enables precise quantum error-correction in short and long haul optical communication, in both free-space and fibre.
  • The evolution of high dimensional entanglement in atmospheric turbulence is investigated. We study the effects of turbulence on photonic states generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion, both theoretically and experimentally. One of the photons propagates through turbulence, while the other is left undisturbed. The atmospheric turbulence is simulated by a single phase screen based on the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence. The output after turbulence is projected into a three-dimensional (qutrit) basis composed of specific Laguerre-Gaussian modes. A full state tomography is performed to determine the density matrix for each output quantum state. These density matrices are used to determine the amount of entanglement, quantified in terms of the negativity, as a function of the scintillation strength. Theoretically, the entanglement is calculated using a single phase screen approximation. We obtain good agreement between theory and experiment.