• We find that in integrable quantum systems there exist two time scales. One is the Ehrenfest time below which the system is classical; the other is the quantum revival time beyond which the system is fully quantum. In between, the quantum system can be well approximated by classical ensemble distribution in phase space. These results can be summarized in a diagram which we call Ehrenfest diagram. We derive an analytical expression for Ehrenfest time, which is proportional to $\hbar^{-1/2}$. According to our formula, the Ehrenfest time for the solar-earth system is about $10^{26}$ times of the age of the solar system. We also find an analytical expression for the quantum revival time, which is proportional to $\hbar^{-1}$. Both time scales involve $\omega(I)$, the classical frequency as a function of classical action. Our results are numerically illustrated with a simple one dimensional integrable model. We show that similar results exist for Bose gases, which may provide an experimental platform for measuring these time scales.
  • Efficient and fair allocation of multiple types of resources is a crucial objective in a cloud/distributed computing cluster. Users may have diverse resource needs. Furthermore, diversity in server properties/ capabilities may mean that only a subset of servers may be usable by a given user. In platforms with such heterogeneity, we identify important limitations in existing multi-resource fair allocation mechanisms, notably Dominant Resource Fairness (DRF) and its follow-up work. To overcome such limitations, we propose a new server-based approach; each server allocates resources by maximizing a per-server utility function. We propose a specific class of utility functions which, when appropriately parameterized, adjusts the trade-off between efficiency and fairness, and captures a variety of fairness measures (such as our recently proposed Per-Server Dominant Share Fairness). We establish conditions for the proposed mechanism to satisfy certain properties that are generally deemed desirable, e.g., envy-freeness, sharing incentive, bottleneck fairness, and Pareto optimality. To implement our resource allocation mechanism, we develop an iterative algorithm which is shown to be globally convergent. Finally, we show how the proposed mechanism could be implemented in a distributed fashion. We carry out extensive trace-driven simulations to show the enhanced performance of our proposed mechanism over the existing ones.
  • Users of cloud computing platforms pose different types of demands for multiple resources on servers (physical or virtual machines). Besides differences in their resource capacities, servers may be additionally heterogeneous in their ability to service users - certain users' tasks may only be serviced by a subset of the servers. We identify important shortcomings in existing multi-resource fair allocation mechanisms - Dominant Resource Fairness (DRF) and its follow up work - when used in such environments. We develop a new fair allocation mechanism called Per-Server Dominant-Share Fairness (PS-DSF) which we show offers all desirable sharing properties that DRF is able to offer in the case of a single "resource pool" (i.e., if the resources of all servers were pooled together into one hypothetical server). We evaluate the performance of PS-DSF through simulations. Our evaluation shows the enhanced efficiency of PS-DSF compared to the existing allocation mechanisms. We argue how our proposed allocation mechanism is applicable in cloud computing networks and especially large scale data-centers.
  • In this paper, a multi-user multi-server queuing system is studied in which each user is constrained to get service from a subset of servers. In the studied system, rate allocation in the sense of max-min fairness results in multi-level fair rates. To achieve such fair rates, we propose $CM^4FQ$ algorithm. In this algorithm users are chosen for service on a packet by packet basis. The priority of each user $i$ to be chosen at time $t$ is determined based on a parameter known as service tag (representing the amount of work counted for user $i$ till time $t$). Hence, a free server will choose to serve an eligible user with the minimum service tag. Based on such simple selection criterion, $CM^4FQ$ aims at guaranteed fair throughput for each demanding user without explicit knowledge of each server service rate. We argue that $CM^4FQ$ can be applied in a variety of practical queuing systems specially in mobile cloud computing architecture.
  • In this paper, asymptotic properties of the loss probability are considered for an M/G/1/N queue with server vacations and exhaustive service discipline, denoted by an M/G/1/N -(V, E)-queue. Exact asymptotic rates of the loss probability are obtained for the cases in which the traffic intensity is smaller than, equal to and greater than one, respectively. When the vacation time is zero, the model considered degenerates to the standard M/G/1/N queue. For this standard queueing model, our analysis provides new or extended asymptotic results for the loss probability. In terms of the duality relationship between the M/G/1/N and GI/M/1/N queues, we also provide asymptotic properties for the standard GI/M/1/N model.