• Covert communication is to achieve a reliable transmission from a transmitter to a receiver while guaranteeing an arbitrarily small probability of this transmission being detected by a warden. In this work, we study the covert communication in AWGN channels with finite blocklength, in which the number of channel uses is finite. Specifically, we analytically prove that the entire block (all available channel uses) should be utilized to maximize the effective throughput of the transmission subject to a predetermined covert requirement. This is a nontrivial result because more channel uses results in more observations at the warden for detecting the transmission. We also determine the maximum allowable transmit power per channel use, which is shown to decrease as the blocklength increases. Despite the decrease in the maximum allowable transmit power per channel use, the maximum allowable total power over the entire block is proved to increase with the blocklength, which leads to the fact that the effective throughput increases with the blocklength.
  • This paper studies a wireless network consisting of multiple transmitter-receiver pairs sharing the same spectrum where interference is regarded as noise. Previously, the throughput region of such a network was characterized for either one time slot or an infinite time horizon. This work aims to close the gap by investigating the throughput region for transmissions over a finite time horizon. We derive an efficient algorithm to examine the achievability of any given rate in the finite-horizon throughput region and provide the rate-achieving policy. The computational efficiency of our algorithm comes from the use of A* search with a carefully chosen heuristic function and a tree pruning strategy. We also show that the celebrated max-weight algorithm which finds all achievable rates in the infinite-horizon throughput region fails to work for the finite-horizon throughput region.
  • This paper studies an online algorithm for an energy harvesting transmitter, where the transmission (completion) time is considered as the system performance. Unlike the existing online algorithms which more or less require the knowledge on the future behavior of the energy-harvesting rate, we consider a practical but significantly more challenging scenario where the energy-harvesting rate is assumed to be totally unknown. Our design is formulated as a robust-optimal control problem which aims to optimize the worst-case performance. The transmit power is designed only based on the current battery energy level and the data queue length directly monitored by the transmitter itself. Specifically, we apply an event-trigger approach in which the transmitter continuously monitors the battery energy and triggers an event when a significant change occurs. Once an event is triggered, the transmit power is updated according to the solution to the robust-optimal control problem, which is given in a simple analytic form. We present numerical results on the transmission time achieved by the proposed design and demonstrate its robust-optimality.
  • This paper studies a wireless network consisting of multiple transmitter-receiver pairs where interference is treated as noise. Previously, the throughput region of such networks was characterized for either one time slot or an infinite time horizon. We aim to fill the gap by investigating the throughput region for transmissions over a finite time horizon. Unlike the infinite-horizon throughput region, which is simply the convex hull of the throughput region of one time slot, the finite-horizon throughput region is generally non-convex. Instead of directly characterizing all achievable rate-tuples in the finite-horizon throughput region, we propose a metric termed the rate margin, which not only determines whether any given rate-tuple is within the throughput region (i.e., achievable or unachievable), but also tells the amount of scaling that can be done to the given achievable (unachievable) rate-tuple such that the resulting rate-tuple is still within (brought back into) the throughput region. Furthermore, we derive an efficient algorithm to find the rate-achieving policy for any given rate-tuple in the finite-horizon throughput region.
  • This paper investigates the offline packet-delay-minimization problem for an energy harvesting transmitter. To overcome the non-convexity of the problem, we propose a C2-diffeomorphic transformation and provide the necessary and sufficient condition for the transformed problem to a standard convex optimization problem. Based on this condition, a simple choice of the transformation is determined which allows an analytically tractable solution of the original non-convex problem to be easily obtained once the transformed convex problem is solved. We further study the structure of the optimal transmission policy in a special case and find it to follow a weighted-directional-water-filling structure. In particular, the optimal policy tends to allocate more power in earlier time slots and less power in later time slots. Our analytical insight is verified by simulation results.
  • In this paper, the recent developments on distributed coordination control, especially the consensus and formation control, are summarized with the graph theory playing a central role, in order to present a cohesive overview of the multi-agent distributed coordination control, together with brief reviews of some closely related issues including rendezvous/alignment, swarming/flocking and containment control.In terms of the consensus problem, the recent results on consensus for the agents with different dynamics from first-order, second-order to high-order linear and nonlinear dynamics, under different communication conditions, such as cases with/without switching communication topology and varying time-delays, are reviewed, in which the algebraic graph theory is very useful in the protocol designs, stability proofs and converging analysis. In terms of the formation control problem, after reviewing the results of the algebraic graph theory employed in the formation control, we mainly pay attention to the developments of the rigid and persistent graphs. With the notions of rigidity and persistence, the formation transformation, splitting and reconstruction can be completed, and consequently the range-based formation control laws are designed with the least required information in order to maintain a formation rigid/persistent. Afterwards, the recent results on rendezvous/alignment, swarming/flocking and containment control, which are very closely related to consensus and formation control, are briefly introduced, in order to present an integrated view of the graph theory used in the coordination control problem. Finally, towards the practical applications, some directions possibly deserving investigation in coordination control are raised as well.
  • In a mobile ad hoc network (MANET), effective prediction of time-varying interferences can enable adaptive transmission designs and therefore improve the communication performance. This paper investigates interference prediction in MANETs with a finite number of nodes by proposing and using a general-order linear model for node mobility. The proposed mobility model can well approximate node dynamics of practical MANETs. In contrast to previous studies on interference statistics, we are able through this model to give a best estimate of the time-varying interference at any time rather than long-term average effects. Specifically, we propose a compound Gaussian point process functional as a general framework to obtain analytical results on the mean value and moment-generating function of the interference prediction. With a series form of this functional, we give the necessary and sufficient condition for when the prediction is essentially equivalent to that from a Binomial Point Process (BPP) network in the limit as time goes to infinity. These conditions permit one to rigorously determine when the commonly used BPP approximations are valid. Finally, our simulation results corroborate the effectiveness and accuracy of the analytical results on interference prediction and also show the advantages of our method in dealing with complex mobilities.