• Nowadays large-scale distributed machine learning systems have been deployed to support various analytics and intelligence services in IT firms. To train a large dataset and derive the prediction/inference model, e.g., a deep neural network, multiple workers are run in parallel to train partitions of the input dataset, and update shared model parameters. In a shared cluster handling multiple training jobs, a fundamental issue is how to efficiently schedule jobs and set the number of concurrent workers to run for each job, such that server resources are maximally utilized and model training can be completed in time. Targeting a distributed machine learning system using the parameter server framework, we design an online algorithm for scheduling the arriving jobs and deciding the adjusted numbers of concurrent workers and parameter servers for each job over its course, to maximize overall utility of all jobs, contingent on their completion times. Our online algorithm design utilizes a primal-dual framework coupled with efficient dual subroutines, achieving good long-term performance guarantees with polynomial time complexity. Practical effectiveness of the online algorithm is evaluated using trace-driven simulation and testbed experiments, which demonstrate its outperformance as compared to commonly adopted scheduling algorithms in today's cloud systems.
  • An "automatic continuity" question has naturally occurred since Roger Howe established the local theta correspondence over $\mathbb R$: does the algebraic version of local theta correspondence over $\mathbb R$ agrees with the smooth version? We show that the answer is yes, at least when the concerning dual pair has no quaternionic type I irreducible factor.
  • Social networks have been popular platforms for information propagation. An important use case is viral marketing: given a promotion budget, an advertiser can choose some influential users as the seed set and provide them free or discounted sample products; in this way, the advertiser hopes to increase the popularity of the product in the users' friend circles by the world-of-mouth effect, and thus maximizes the number of users that information of the production can reach. There has been a body of literature studying the influence maximization problem. Nevertheless, the existing studies mostly investigate the problem on a one-off basis, assuming fixed known influence probabilities among users, or the knowledge of the exact social network topology. In practice, the social network topology and the influence probabilities are typically unknown to the advertiser, which can be varying over time, i.e., in cases of newly established, strengthened or weakened social ties. In this paper, we focus on a dynamic non-stationary social network and design a randomized algorithm, RSB, based on multi-armed bandit optimization, to maximize influence propagation over time. The algorithm produces a sequence of online decisions and calibrates its explore-exploit strategy utilizing outcomes of previous decisions. It is rigorously proven to achieve an upper-bounded regret in reward and applicable to large-scale social networks. Practical effectiveness of the algorithm is evaluated using both synthetic and real-world datasets, which demonstrates that our algorithm outperforms previous stationary methods under non-stationary conditions.
  • For every irreducible Harish-Chandra module of $O^{*}(4)$, we determine its theta lift to $Sp(p,q)$ in terms of the Langlands parameter, for all non-negative integers $p$ and $q$. Our strategy is to determine the desired theta lifts by their infinitesimal characters and lowest $K$-types.
  • In this paper, we study the representation theory for the affine Lie algebra $\H$ associated to the Nappi-Witten model $H_{4}$. We classify all the irreducible highest weight modules of $\H$. Furthermore, we give a necessary and sufficient condition for each $\H$-(generalized) Verma module to be irreducible. For reducible ones, we characterize all the linearly independent singular vectors. Finally, we construct Wakimoto type modules for these Lie algebras and interpret this construction in terms of vertex operator algebras and their modules.