• Results concerning the construction of quantum Bayesian error regions as a means to certify the quality of parameter point estimators have been reported in recent years. This task remains numerically formidable in practice for large dimensions and so far, no analytical expressions of the region size and credibility (probability of any given true parameter residing in the region) are known, which form the two principal region properties to be reported alongside a point estimator obtained from collected data. We first establish analytical formulas for the size and credibility that are valid for a uniform prior distribution over parameters, sufficiently large data samples and general constrained convex parameter-estimation settings. These formulas provide a means to an efficient asymptotic error certification for parameters of arbitrary dimensions. Next, we demonstrate the accuracies of these analytical formulas as compared to numerically computed region quantities with simulated examples in qubit and qutrit quantum-state tomography where computations of the latter are feasible.
  • Bayesian error analysis paves the way to the construction of credible and plausible error regions for a point estimator obtained from a given dataset. We introduce the concept of region accuracy for error regions (a generalization of the point-estimator mean squared-error) to quantify the average statistical accuracy of all region points with respect to the unknown true parameter. We show that the increase in region accuracy is closely related to the Bayesian-region dual operations in [1]. Next with only the given dataset as viable evidence, we establish various adaptive methods to maximize the region accuracy relative to the true parameter subject to the type of reported Bayesian region for a given point estimator. We highlight the performance of these adaptive methods by comparing them with nonadaptive procedures in three quantum-parameter estimation examples. The results of and mechanisms behind the adaptive schemes can be understood as the region analog of adaptive approaches to achieving the quantum Cramer--Rao bound for point estimators.
  • Balanced homodyning, heterodyning and unbalanced homodyning are the three well-known sampling techniques used in quantum optics to characterize all possible photonic sources in continuous-variable quantum information theory. We show that for all quantum states and all observable-parameter tomography schemes, which includes the reconstructions of arbitrary operator moments and phase-space quasi-distributions, localized sampling with unbalanced homodyning is always tomographically more powerful (gives more accurate estimators) than delocalized sampling with heterodyning. The latter is recently known to often give more accurate parameter reconstructions than conventional marginalized sampling with balanced homodyning. This result also holds for realistic photodetectors with subunit efficiency. With examples from first- through fourth-moment tomography, we demonstrate that unbalanced homodyning can outperform balanced homodyning when heterodyning fails to do so. This new benchmark takes us one step towards optimal continuous-variable tomography with conventional photodetectors and minimal experimental components.
  • Wigner and Husimi quasi-distributions, owing to their functional regularity, give the two archetypal and equivalent representations of all observable-parameters in continuous-variable quantum information. Balanced homodyning and heterodyning that correspond to their associated sampling procedures, on the other hand, fare very differently concerning their state or parameter reconstruction accuracies. We present a general theory of a now-known fact that heterodyning can be tomographically more powerful than balanced homodyning to many interesting classes of single-mode quantum states, and discuss the treatment for two-mode sources.
  • We examine the moment-reconstruction performance of both the homodyne and heterodyne (double-homodyne) measurement schemes for arbitrary quantum states and introduce moment estimators that optimize the respective schemes for any given data. In the large-data limit, these estimators are as efficient as the maximum-likelihood estimators. We then illustrate the superiority of the heterodyne measurement for the reconstruction of the first and second moments by analyzing Gaussian states and many other significant non-classical states.
  • In continuous-variable tomography, with finite data and limited computation resources, reconstruction of a quantum state of light is performed on a finite-dimensional subspace. No systematic method was ever developed to assign such a reconstruction subspace---only ad hoc methods that rely on hard-to-certify assumptions about the source and strategies. We provide a straightforward and numerically feasible procedure to uniquely determine the appropriate reconstruction subspace for any given unknown quantum state of light and measurement scheme. This procedure makes use of the celebrated statistical principle of maximum likelihood, along with other validation tools, to grow an appropriate seed subspace into the optimal reconstruction subspace, much like the nucleation of a seed into a crystal. Apart from using the available measurement data, no other spurious assumptions about the source or ad hoc strategies are invoked. As a result, there will no longer be reconstruction artifacts present in state reconstruction, which is a usual consequence of a bad choice of reconstruction subspace. The procedure can be understood as the maximum-likelihood reconstruction for quantum subspaces, which is an analog to, and fully compatible with that for quantum states.
  • The accuracy in determining the quantum state of a system depends on the type of measurement performed. Homodyne and heterodyne detection are the two main schemes in continuous-variable quantum information. The former leads to a direct reconstruction of the Wigner function of the state, whereas the latter samples its Husimi $Q$~function. We experimentally demonstrate that heterodyne detection outperforms homodyne detection for almost all Gaussian states, the details of which depend on the squeezing strength and thermal noise.
  • We present a simple and efficient Bayesian recursive algorithm for the data-pattern scheme for quantum state reconstruction, which is applicable to situations where measurement settings can be controllably varied efficiently. The algorithm predicts the best measurements required to accurately reconstruct the unknown signal state in terms of a fixed set of probe states. In each iterative step, this algorithm seeks the measurement setting that minimizes the variance of the data-pattern estimator, which essentially measures the reconstruction accuracy, with the help of a data-pattern bank that was acquired prior to the signal reconstruction. We show that with this algorithm, it is possible to minimize the number of measurement settings required to obtain a reasonably accurate state estimator by using just the optimal settings and, at the same time, increasing the numerical efficiency of the data-pattern reconstruction.
  • We reveal that quadrature squeezing can result in significantly better quantum-estimation performance with quantum heterodyne detection (of H. P. Yuen and J. H. Shapiro) as compared to quantum homodyne detection for Gaussian states, which touches an important aspect in the foundational understanding of these two schemes. Taking single-mode Gaussian states as examples, we show analytically that the competition between the errors incurred during tomogram processing in homodyne detection and the Arthurs-Kelly uncertainties arising from simultaneous incompatible quadrature measurements in heterodyne detection can often lead to the latter giving more accurate estimates. This observation is also partly a manifestation of a fundamental relationship between the respective data uncertainties for the two schemes. In this sense, quadrature squeezing can be used to overcome intrinsic quantum-measurement uncertainties in heterodyne detection.
  • We introduce an operational and statistically meaningful measure, the quantum tomographic transfer function, that possesses important physical invariance properties for judging whether a given informationally complete quantum measurement performs better tomographically in quantum-state estimation relative to other informationally complete measurements. This function is independent of the unknown true state of the quantum source, and is directly related to the average optimal tomographic accuracy of an unbiased state estimator for the measurement in the limit of many sampling events. For the experimentally-appealing minimally complete measurements, the transfer function is an extremely simple formula. We also give an explicit expression for this transfer function in terms of an ordered expansion that is readily computable and illustrate its usage with numerical simulations, and its consistency with some known results.
  • We report an experiment in which one determines, with least tomographic effort, whether an unknown two-photon polarization state is entangled or separable. The method measures whole families of optimal entanglement witnesses. We introduce adaptive measurement schemes that greatly speed up the entanglement detection. The experiments are performed on states of different ranks, and we find good agreement with results from computer simulations.
  • In quantum-state tomography on sources with quantum degrees of freedom of large Hilbert spaces, inference of quantum states of light for instance, a complete characterization of the quantum states for these sources is often not feasible owing to limited resources. As such, the concepts of informationally incomplete state estimation becomes important. These concepts are ideal for applications to quantum channel/process tomography, which typically requires a much larger number of measurement settings for a full characterization of a quantum channel. Some key aspects of both quantum-state and quantum-process tomography are arranged together in the form of a tutorial review article that is catered to students and researchers who are new to the field of quantum tomography, with focus on maximum-likelihood related techniques as instructive examples to illustrate these ideas.
  • We report a controllable method for producing mixed two-photon states via Spontaneous Parametric Down-Conversion with a two-type-I crystal geometry. By using variable polarization rotators (VPRs), one obtains mixed states of various purities and degrees of entanglement depending on the parameters of the VPRs. The generated states are characterized by quantum state tomography. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the theory. The method can be easily implemented for various experiments which require the generation of states with controllable degrees of entanglement or mixedness.
  • We introduce a straightforward numerical coarse-graining scheme to estimate quantum states for a set of noisy measurement outcomes, which are difficult to calibrate, that is based solely on the measurement data collected from these outcomes. This scheme involves the maximization of a weighted entropy function that is simple to implement and can readily be extended to any number of ill-calibrated noisy outcomes in a measurement set-up, thus offering practical applicability for general tomography experiments without additional knowledge or assumptions about the structures of the noisy outcomes. Simulation results for two-qubit quantum states show that coarse-graining can improve the tomographic efficiencies for noise levels ranging from low to moderately high values.
  • This is a PhD dissertation on the latest numerical quantum estimation schemes as of 2012, submitted to the National University of Singapore. The main content of the thesis focuses on accessing quantum information with informationally incomplete measurements to reconstruct quantum states of large quantum systems, as well as to reduce the amount of resources to reconstruct quantum channels.
  • There exists, in general, a convex set of quantum state estimators that maximize the likelihood for informationally incomplete data. We propose an estimation scheme, catered to measurement data of this kind, to search for the exact maximum-likelihood-maximum-entropy estimator using semidefinite programming and a standard multi-dimensional function optimization routine. This scheme can be used to infer the expectation values of a set of entanglement witnesses that can be used to verify the entanglement of the unknown quantum state for composite systems. Next, we establish an alternative numerical scheme that is more computationally robust for the sole purpose of maximizing the likelihood and entropy.
  • We present a detailed account of quantum state estimation by joint maximization of the likelihood and the entropy. After establishing the algorithms for both perfect and imperfect measurements, we apply the procedure to data from simulated and actual experiments. We demonstrate that the realistic situation of incomplete data from imperfect measurements can be handled successfully.
  • We propose an iterative algorithm for incomplete quantum process tomography, with the help of quantum state estimation, based on the combined principles of maximum-likelihood and maximum-entropy. The algorithm yields a unique estimator for an unknown quantum process when one has less than a complete set of linearly independent measurement data to specify the quantum process uniquely. We apply this iterative algorithm adaptively in various situations and so optimize the amount of resources required to estimate the quantum process with incomplete data.
  • In the four-dimensional Hilbert space, there exist 16 Heisenberg--Weyl (HW) covariant symmetric informationally complete positive operator valued measures (SIC~POVMs) consisting of 256 fiducial states on a single orbit of the Clifford group. We explore the structure of these SIC~POVMs by studying the symmetry transformations within a given SIC~POVM and among different SIC~POVMs. Furthermore, we find 16 additional SIC~POVMs by a regrouping of the 256 fiducial states, and show that they are unitarily equivalent to the original 16 SIC~POVMs by establishing an explicit unitary transformation. We then reveal the additional structure of these SIC~POVMs when the four-dimensional Hilbert space is taken as the tensor product of two qubit Hilbert spaces. In particular, when either the standard product basis or the Bell basis are chosen as the defining basis of the HW group, in eight of the 16 HW covariant SIC~POVMs, all fiducial states have the same concurrence of $\sqrt{2/5}$. These SIC~POVMs are particularly appealing for an experimental implementation, since all fiducial states can be connected to each other with just local unitary transformations. In addition, we introduce a concise representation of the fiducial states with the aid of a suitable tabular arrangement of their parameters.
  • State tomography on qubit pairs is routinely carried out by measuring the two qubits separately, while one expects a higher efficiency from tomography with highly symmetric joint measurements of both qubits. Our numerical study of simulated experiments does not support such expectations.
  • We introduce informationally complete measurements whose outcomes are entanglement witnesses and so answer the question of how many witnesses need to be measured to decide whether an arbitrary state is entangled or not: as many as the dimension of the state space. The optimized witness-based measurement can provide exponential improvement with respect to witness efficiency in high-dimensional Hilbert spaces, at the price of a reduction in the tomographic efficiency. We describe a systematic construction, and illustrate the matter at the example of two qubits.