• We use high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and electronic structure calculations to study the electronic properties of rare-earth monoantimonides RSb (R = Y, Ce, Gd, Dy, Ho, Tm, Lu). The experimentally measured Fermi surface (FS) of RSb consists of at least two concentric hole pockets at the $\Gamma$ point and two intersecting electron pockets at the $X$ point. These data agree relatively well with the electronic structure calculations. Detailed photon energy dependence measurements using both synchrotron and laser ARPES systems indicate that there is at least one Fermi surface sheet with strong three-dimensionality centered at the $\Gamma$ point. Due to the "lanthanide contraction", the unit cell of different rare-earth monoantimonides shrinks when changing rare-earth ion from CeSb to LuSb. This results in the differences in the chemical potentials in these compounds, which is demonstrated by both ARPES measurements and electronic structure calculations. Interestingly, in CeSb, the intersecting electron pockets at the $X$ point seem to be touching the valence bands, forming a four-fold degenerate Dirac-like feature. On the other hand, the remaining rare-earth monoantimonides show significant gaps between the upper and lower bands at the $X$ point. Furthermore, similar to the previously reported results of LaBi, a Dirac-like structure was observed at the $\Gamma$ point in YSb, CeSb, and GdSb, compounds showing relatively high magnetoresistance. This Dirac-like structure may contribute to the unusually large magnetoresistance in these compounds.
  • In topological quantum materials the conduction and valence bands are connected at points (Dirac/Weyl semimetals) or along lines (Line Node semimetals) in the momentum space. Numbers of studies demonstrated that several materials are indeed Dirac/Weyl semimetals. However, there is still no experimental confirmation of materials with line nodes, in which the Dirac nodes form closed loops in the momentum space. Here we report the discovery of a novel topological structure - Dirac node arcs - in the ultrahigh magnetoresistive material PtSn4 using laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Unlike the closed loops of line nodes, the Dirac node arc structure resembles the Dirac dispersion in graphene that is extended along one dimension in momentum space and confined by band gaps on either end. We propose that this reported Dirac node arc structure is a novel topological state that provides a novel platform for studying the exotic properties of Dirac Fermions.
  • We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the electronic structure of CaFe$_2$As$_2$ in previously unexplored collapsed tetragonal (CT) phase. This unusual phase of the iron arsenic high temperature superconductors was hard to measure as it exists only under pressure. By inducing internal strain, via the post growth, thermal treatment of the single crystals, we were able to stabilize the CT phase at ambient-pressure. We find significant differences in the Fermi surface topology and band dispersion data from the more common orthorhombic-antiferromagnetic or tetragonal-paramagnetic phases, consistent with electronic structure calculations. The top of the hole bands sinks below the Fermi level, which destroys the nesting present in parent phases. The absence of nesting in this phase along with apparent loss of Fe magnetic moment, are now clearly experimentally correlated with the lack of superconductivity in this phase.
  • Rare-earth platinum bismuth (RPtBi) has been recently proposed to be a potential topological insulator. In this paper we present measurements of the metallic surface electronic structure in three members of this family, using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Our data shows clear spin-orbit splitting of the surface bands and the Kramers' degeneracy of spins at the Gamma and M points, which is nicely reproduced with our full-potential augmented plane wave calculation for a surface electronic state. No direct indication of topologically non-trivial behavior is detected, except for a weak Fermi crossing detected in close vicinity to the Gamma point, making the total number of Fermi crossings odd. In the surface band calculation, however, this crossing is explained by another Kramers' pair where the two splitting bands are very close to each other. The classification of this family of materials as topological insulators remains an open question.
  • We measured the electronic structure of an iron arsenic parent compound LaFeAsO using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). By comparing with a full-potential Linear Augmented PlaneWave calculation we show that the extra large Gamma hole pocket measured via ARPES comes from electronic structure at the sample surface. Based on this we discuss the strong polarization dependence of the band structure and a temperature-dependent hole-like band around the M point. The two phenomena give additional evidences for the existence of the surface-driven electronic structure.
  • We propose the projected BCS wave function as the ground state for the doped Mott insulator SrCu2(BO3)2 on the Shastry-Sutherland lattice. At half filling this wave function yields the exact ground state. Adding mobile charge carriers, we find a strong asymmetry between electron and hole doping. Upon electron doping an unusual metal with strong valence bond correlations forms. Hole doped systems are d-wave RVB superconductors in which superconductivity is strongly enhanced by the emergence of inhomogeneous plaquette bond order.