• Stellar fundamental parameters are important in the asteroseismic study of Kepler light curves. However, the most used estimates in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) are not accurate enough for hot stars. Using a sample of B stars from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) spectral survey, we confirmed the systematic underestimation in KIC effective temperature and overestimation in KIC surface gravity. The good agreement between LAMOST and other follow-up observations proved the accuracy of effective temperature and surface gravity of B stars derived from LAMOST low-resolution spectra. By searching through LAMOST data, we found four misclassified main-sequence B stars in the Kepler field, which had been previously classified as A-type variables. We present spectroscopic and detailed frequency analysis of these four stars based on LAMOST spectra and Kepler photometry.
  • We present the ultraviolet magnitudes for over three million stars in the LAMOST survey, in which 2,202,116 stars are detected by $GALEX$. For 889,235 undetected stars, we develop a method to estimate their upper limit magnitudes. The distribution of (FUV $-$ NUV) shows that the color declines with increasing effective temperature for stars hotter than 7000 K in our sample, while the trend disappears for the cooler stars due to upper atmosphere emission from the regions higher than their photospheres. For stars with valid stellar parameters, we calculate the UV excesses with synthetic model spectra, and find that the (FUV $-$ NUV) vs. $R'_{\mathrm{FUV}}$ can be fitted with a linear relation and late-type dwarfs tend to have high UV excesses. There are 87,178 and 1,498,103 stars detected more than once in the visit exposures of $GALEX$ in the FUV and NUV, respectively. We make use of the quantified photometric errors to determine statistical properties of the UV variation, including intrinsic variability and the structure function on the timescale of days. The overall occurrence of possible false positives is below 1.3\% in our sample. UV absolute magnitudes are calculated for stars with valid parallaxes, which could serve as a possible reference frame in the NUV. We conclude that the colors related to UV provide good criteria to distinguish between M giants and M dwarfs, and the variability of RR Lyrae stars in our sample is stronger than that of other A and F stars.
  • The radial number density and flattening of the Milky Way's stellar halo is measured with $\mathrm{5351}$ metal-poor ([Fe/H]$<-1$) K giants from LAMOST DR3, using a nonparametric method which is model independent and largely avoids the influence of halo substucture. The number density profile is well described by a single power law with index $5.03^{+0.64}_{-0.64}$, and flattening that varies with radius. The stellar halo traced by LAMOST K giants is more flattened at smaller radii, and becomes nearly spherical at larger radii. The flattening, $q$, is about 0.64, 0.8, 0.96 at $r=15$, 20 and 30 kpc (where $r=\sqrt{R^2+\left[Z/q\left(r\right)\right]^2}$), respectively. Moreover, the leading arm of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy tidal stream in the north, and the trailing arm in the south, are significant in the residual map of density distribution. In addition, an unknown overdensity is identified in the residual map at (R,Z)=(30,15) kpc.
  • We present a statistical method to derive the stellar density profiles of the Milky Way from spectroscopic survey data, taking into account selection effects. We assume that the selection function of the spectroscopic survey is based on photometric colors and magnitudes and possibly altered during observations and data reductions. Then the underlying selection function for a line-of-sight can be well recovered by comparing the distribution of the spectroscopic stars in a color-magnitude plane with that of the photometric dataset. Subsequently, the stellar density profile along a line-of-sight can be derived from the spectroscopically measured stellar density profile multiplied by the selection function. The method is validated using Galaxia mock data with two different selection functions. We demonstrate that the derived stellar density profiles well reconstruct the true ones not only for the full targets, but also for the sub-populations selected from the full dataset. Finally, the method is applied to map the density profiles for the Galactic disk and halo, respectively, using the LAMOST RGB stars. The Galactic disk extends to about R=19 kpc, where the disk still contributes about 10% to the total stellar surface density. Beyond this radius, the disk smoothly transitions to the halo without any truncation, bending, or broken. Moreover, no over-density corresponding to the Monoceros ring is found in the Galactic anti-center direction. The disk shows moderate north-south asymmetry at radii larger than 12 kpc. On the other hand, the R-Z tomographic map directly shows that the stellar halo is substantially oblate within a Galactocentric radius of 20 kpc and gradually becomes nearly spherical beyond 30 kpc.
  • We present the second release of value-added catalogues of the LAMOST Spectroscopic Survey of the Galactic Anticentre (LSS-GAC DR2). The catalogues present values of radial velocity $V_{\rm r}$, atmospheric parameters --- effective temperature $T_{\rm eff}$, surface gravity log$g$, metallicity [Fe/H], $\alpha$-element to iron (metal) abundance ratio [$\alpha$/Fe] ([$\alpha$/M]), elemental abundances [C/H] and [N/H], and absolute magnitudes ${\rm M}_V$ and ${\rm M}_{K_{\rm s}}$ deduced from 1.8 million spectra of 1.4 million unique stars targeted by the LSS-GAC since September 2011 until June 2014. The catalogues also give values of interstellar reddening, distance and orbital parameters determined with a variety of techniques, as well as proper motions and multi-band photometry from the far-UV to the mid-IR collected from the literature and various surveys. Accuracies of radial velocities reach 5kms$^{-1}$ for late-type stars, and those of distance estimates range between 10 -- 30 per cent, depending on the spectral signal-to-noise ratios. Precisions of [Fe/H], [C/H] and [N/H] estimates reach 0.1dex, and those of [$\alpha$/Fe] and [$\alpha$/M] reach 0.05dex. The large number of stars, the contiguous sky coverage, the simple yet non-trivial target selection function and the robust estimates of stellar radial velocities and atmospheric parameters, distances and elemental abundances, make the catalogues a valuable data set to study the structure and evolution of the Galaxy, especially the solar-neighbourhood and the outer disk.
  • Using the LAMOST-Gaia common stars, we demonstrate that the in-plane velocity field for the nearby young stars are significantly different from that for the old ones. For the young stars, the probably perturbed velocities similar to the old population are mostly removed from the velocity maps in the $X$--$Y$ plane. The residual velocity field shows that the young stars consistently move along $Y$ with faster $v_\phi$ at the trailing side of the local arm, while at the leading side, they move slower in azimuth direction. At both sides, the young stars averagely move inward with $v_R$ of $-5\sim-3$ km s$^{-1}$. The divergence of the velocity in $Y$ direction implies that the young stars are associated with a density wave nearby the local arm. We therefore suggest that the young stars may reflect the formation of the local spiral arm by correlating themselves with a density wave. The range of the age for the young stars is around 2 Gyr, which is sensible since the transient spiral arm can sustain that long. We also point out that alternative explanations of the peculiar velocity field for the young population cannot be ruled out only from this observed data.
  • We present a sample of 48 metal-poor galaxies at $ z < 0.14$ selected from 92,510 galaxies in the LAMOST survey. These galaxies are identified for their detection of the auroral emission line \oiii$\lambda$4363 above $3\sigma$ level, which allows a direct measurement of the electron temperature and the oxygen abundance. The emission line fluxes are corrected for internal dust extinction using Balmer decrement method. With electron temperature derived from \oiii$\lambda\lambda4959,5007/\oiii\lambda4363$ and electron density from $\sii\lambda6731/\sii\lambda6717$, we obtain the oxygen abundances in our sample which range from $\zoh= 7.63$ (0.09 $\Zsun$) to $8.46$ (0.6 $\Zsun$). We find an extremely metal-poor galaxy with $\zoh=7.63 \pm 0.01$. With multiband photometric data from FUV to NIR and $\ha$ measurements, we also determine the stellar masses and star formation rates, based on the spectral energy distribution fitting and $\ha$ luminosity, respectively. We find that our galaxies have low and intermediate stellar masses with $\rm 6.39 \le log(M/M_{\sun})\le 9.27$, and high star formation rates (SFRs) with $\rm -2.18 \le log(SFR/M_{\sun} yr^{-1}) \le 1.95$. We also find that the metallicities of our galaxies are consistent with the local $T_e$-based mass-metallicity relation, while the scatter is about 0.28 dex. Additionally, assuming the coefficient of $\rm \alpha =0.66$, we find most of our galaxies follow the local mass-metallicity-SFR relation, while a scatter about 0.24 dex exists, suggesting the mass-metallicity relation is weakly dependent on SFR for those metal-poor galaxies.
  • Accurate determination of stellar atmospheric parameters and elemental abundances is crucial for Galactic archeology via large-scale spectroscopic surveys. In this paper, we estimate stellar atmospheric parameters -- effective temperature T_{\rm eff}, surface gravity log g and metallicity [Fe/H], absolute magnitudes M_V and M_{Ks}, {\alpha}-element to metal (and iron) abundance ratio [{\alpha}/M] (and [{\alpha}/Fe]), as well as carbon and nitrogen abundances [C/H] and [N/H] from the LAMOST spectra with amultivariate regressionmethod based on kernel-based principal component analysis, using stars in common with other surveys (Hipparcos, Kepler, APOGEE) as training data sets. Both internal and external examinations indicate that given a spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) better than 50, our method is capable of delivering stellar parameters with a precision of ~100K for Teff, ~0.1 dex for log g, 0.3 -- 0.4mag for M_V and M_{Ks}, 0.1 dex for [Fe/H], [C/H] and [N/H], and better than 0.05 dex for [{\alpha}/M] ([{\alpha}/Fe]). The results are satisfactory even for a spectral SNR of 20. The work presents first determinations of [C/H] and [N/H] abundances from a vast data set of LAMOST, and, to our knowledge, the first reported implementation of absolute magnitude estimation directly based on the observed spectra. The derived stellar parameters for millions of stars from the LAMOST surveys will be publicly available in the form of value-added catalogues.
  • Based on the LAMOST survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we use low-resolution spectra of 130,043 F/G-type dwarf stars to study the kinematics and metallicity properties of the Galactic disk. Our study shows that the stars with poorer metallicity and larger vertical distance from Galactic plane tend to have larger eccentricity and velocity dispersion. After separating the sample stars into likely thin-disk and thick-disk sub-sample, we find that there exits a negative gradient of rotation velocity $V_{\phi}$ with metallicity [Fe/H] for the likely thin-disk sub-sample, and the thick-disk sub-sample exhibit a larger positive gradient of rotation velocity with metallicity. By comparing with model prediction, we consider the radial migration of stars appears to have influenced on the thin-disk formation. In addition, our results shows that the observed thick-disk stellar orbital eccentricity distribution peaks at low eccentricity ($e \sim 0.2$) and extends to a high eccentricity ($e \sim 0.8$). We compare this result with four thick-disk formation simulated models, and it imply that our result is consistent with gas-rich merger model.
  • The rotation curve (RC) of the Milky Way out to $\sim$ 100 kpc has been constructed using $\sim$ 16,000 primary red clump giants (PRCGs) in the outer disk selected from the LSS-GAC and the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey, combined with $\sim$ 5700 halo K giants (HKGs) selected from the SDSS/SEGUE survey. To derive the RC, the PRCG sample of the warm disc population and the HKG sample of halo stellar population are respectively analyzed using a kinematical model allowing for the asymmetric drift corrections and re-analyzed using the spherical Jeans equation along with measurements of the anisotropic parameter $\beta$ currently available. The typical uncertainties of RC derived from the PRCG and HKG samples are respectively 5-7 km/s and several tens km/s. We determine a circular velocity at the solar position, $V_c (R_0)$ = 240 $\pm$ 6 km/s and an azimuthal peculiar speed of the Sun, $V_{\odot}$ = 12.1 $\pm$ 7.6 km/s, both in good agreement with the previous determinations. The newly constructed RC has a generally flat value of 240 km/s within a Galactocentric distance $r$ of 25 kpc and then decreases steadily to 150 km/s at $r$ $\sim$ 100 kpc. On top of this overall trend, the RC exhibits two prominent localized dips, one at $r$ $\sim$ 11 kpc and another at $r$ $\sim$ 19 kpc. From the newly constructed RC, combined with other constraints, we have built a parametrized mass model for the Galaxy, yielding a virial mass of the Milky Way's dark matter halo of $0.90^{+0.07}_{-0.08} \times 10^{12}$ ${\rm M}_{\odot}$ and a local dark matter density, $\rho_{\rm \odot, dm} = 0.32^{+0.02}_{-0.02}$ GeV cm$^{-3}$.
  • All of the 14 subfields of the Kepler field have been observed at least once with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, Xinglong Observatory, China) during the 2012-2014 observation seasons. There are 88,628 reduced spectra with SNR$_g$ (signal-to-noise ratio in g band) $\geq$ 6 after the first round (2012-2014) of observations for the LAMOST-Kepler project (LK-project). By adopting the upgraded version of the LAMOST Stellar Parameter pipeline (LASP), we have determined the atmospheric parameters ($T_{\rm eff}$ , $\log g$, and $\rm [Fe/H]$) and heliocentric radial velocity $v_{\rm rad}$ for 51,406 stars with 61,226 spectra. Compared with atmospheric parameters derived from both high-resolution spectroscopy and asteroseismology method for common stars in Huber et al. (2014), an external calibration of LASP atmospheric parameters was made, leading to the determination of external errors for the giants and dwarfs, respectively. Multiple spectroscopic observations for the same objects of the LK-project were used to estimate the internal uncertainties of the atmospheric parameters as a function of SNR$_g$ with the unbiased estimation method. The LASP atmospheric parameters were calibrated based on both the external and internal uncertainties for the giants and dwarfs, respectively. A general statistical analysis of the stellar parameters leads to discovery of 106 candidate metal-poor stars, 9 candidate very metal-poor stars, and 18 candidate high-velocity stars. Fitting formulae were obtained segmentally for both the calibrated atmospheric parameters of the LK-project and the KIC parameters with the common stars. The calibrated atmospheric parameters and radial velocities of the LK-project will be useful for studying stars in the Kepler field.
  • We present a catalogue including 11,204 spectra for 10,436 early-type emission-line stars from LAMOST DR2, among which 9,752 early-type emission-line spectra are newly discovered. For these early-type emission-line stars, we discuss the morphological and physical properties from their low-resolution spectra. In this spectral sample, the H$\alpha$ emission profiles display a wide variety of shapes. Based on the H$\alpha$ line profiles, these spectra are categorized into five distinct classes: single-peak emission, single-peak emission in absorption, double-peak emission, double-peak emission in absorption, and P-Cygni profiles. To better understand what causes the H$\alpha$ line profiles, we divide these objects into four types from the view of physical classification, which include classical Be stars, Herbig Ae/Be stars, close binaries and spectra contaminated by HII regions. The majority of Herbig Ae/Be stars and classical Be stars are identified and separated using the (H-K, K-W1) color-color diagram. We also discuss thirty one binary systems as listed in SIMBAD on-line catalogue and identify 3,600 spectra contaminated by HII regions after cross matching with positions in the Dubout-Crillon catalogue. A statistical analysis of line profiles versus classifications is then conducted in order to understand the distribution of H$\alpha$ profiles for each type in our sample. Finally, we also provide a table of 172 spectra with FeII emission lines and roughly calculate stellar wind velocities for seven spectra with P-Cygni profiles.
  • Asteroseismology is a powerful tool to precisely determine the evolutionary status and fundamental properties of stars. With the unprecedented precision and nearly continuous photometric data acquired by the NASA Kepler mission, parameters of more than 10$^4$ stars have been determined nearly consistently. However, most studies still use photometric effective temperatures (Teff) and metallicities ([Fe/H]) as inputs, which are not sufficiently accurate as suggested by previous studies. We adopted the spectroscopic Teff and [Fe/H] values based on the LAMOST low-resolution spectra (R~1,800), and combined them with the global oscillation parameters to derive the physical parameters of a large sample of stars. Clear trends were found between {\Delta}logg(LAMOST - seismic) and spectroscopic Teff as well as logg, which may result in an overestimation of up to 0.5 dex for the logg of giants in the LAMOST catalog. We established empirical calibration relations for the logg values of dwarfs and giants. These results can be used for determining the precise distances to these stars based on their spectroscopic parameters.
  • We report two new tidal debris nearby the Sagittarius (Sgr) tidal stream in the north Galactic cap identified from the M giant stars in LAMOST DR2 data. The M giant stars with sky area of $210^\circ<$\Lambda$<290^\circ$, distance of 10--20kpc, and [Fe/H]$<-0.75$ show clear bimodality in velocity distribution. We denote the two peaks as Vel-3+83 for the one within mean velocity of -3kms$^{-1}$ with respect to that of the well observed Sgr leading tail at the same $\Lambda$ and Vel+162+26 for the other one with mean velocity of 162kms$^{-1}$ with respect to the Sgr leading tail. Although the projected $\Lambda$--$V_{gar}$ relation of Vel-3+83 is very similar to the Sgr leading tail, the opposite trend in $\Lambda$--distance relation against the Sgr leading tail suggests Vel-3+83 has a different 3D direction of motion with any branch of the simulated Sgr tidal stream from Law & Majewski. Therefore, we propose it to be a new tidal debris not related to the Sgr stream. Similarly, the another substructure Vel+162+26, which is the same one as the NGC group discovered by Chou et al., also moves toward a different direction with the Sgr stream, implying that it may have different origin with the Sgr tidal stream.
  • We derive the fraction of substructure in the Galactic halo using a sample of over 10,000 spectroscopically-confirmed halo giant stars from the LAMOST spectroscopic survey. By observing 100 synthetic models along each line of sight with the LAMOST selection function in that sky area, we statistically characterize the expected halo populations. We define as SHARDS (Stellar Halo Accretion Related Debris Structures) any stars in >3-sigma excesses above the model predictions. We find that at least 10% of the Milky Way halo stars from LAMOST are part of SHARDS. By running our algorithm on smooth halos observed with the LAMOST selection function, we show that the LAMOST data contain excess substructure over all Galactocentric radii R_GC < 40 kpc, beyond what is expected due to statistical fluctuations and incomplete sampling of a smooth halo. The level of substructure is consistent with the fraction of stars in SHARDS in model halos created entirely from accreted satellites. This work illustrates the potential of vast spectroscopic surveys with high filling factors over large sky areas to recreate the merging history of the Milky Way.
  • Since the release of LAMOST (the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope) catalog, we have the opportunity to use the LAMOST DR2 stellar catalog and \emph{WISE All-sky catalog} to search for 22 $\mu$m excess candidates. In this paper, we present 10 FGK candidates which show an excess in the infrared (IR) at 22 $\mu$m. The ten sources are all the newly identified 22 $\mu$m excess candidates. Of these 10 stars, 5 stars are F type and 5 stars are G type. The criterion for selecting candidates is $K_s-[22]_{\mu m}\geq0.387$. In addition, we present the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) covering wavelength from optical to mid-infrared band. Most of them show an obvious excess from 12 $\mu$m band and three candidates even show excess from 3.4 $\mu$m. To characterize the amount of dust, we also estimate the fractional luminosity of ten 22 $\mu$m excess candidates.
  • Using LAMOST spectroscopic data, we find a strong signal of a comoving group of stars in the constellation of Draco. The group, observed near the apocenter of its orbit, is 2.6 kpc from the Sun with a metallicity of -0.64 dex. The system is observed as a streaming population of unknown provenance with mass of about 2.1E4 solar masses and an absolute V band magnitude of about -3.6. Its high metallicity, diffuse physical structure, and eccentric orbit may indicate that the progenitor satellite was a globular cluster rather than a dwarf galaxy or an open cluster.
  • A small fraction($<10\%$) of SDSS main sample galaxies(MGs) have not been targeted with spectroscopy due to the the fiber collision effect. These galaxies have been compiled into the input catalog of the LAMOST extra-galactic survey and named as the complementary galaxy sample. In this paper, we introduce the project and the status of the spectroscopies of the complementary galaxies in the first two years of the LAMOST spectral survey(till Sep. of 2014). Moreover, we present a sample of 1,102 galaxy pairs identified from the LAMOST complementary galaxies and SDSS MGs, which are defined as that the two members have a projected distance smaller than 100 kpc and the recessional velocity difference smaller than 500 $\rm kms^{-1}$. Compared with the SDSS only selected galaxy pairs, the LAMOST-SDSS pairs take the advantages of not being biased toward large separations and therefor play as a useful supplement to the statistical studies of galaxy interaction and galaxy merging.
  • Measurement of the local dark matter density plays an important role in both Galactic dynamics and dark matter direct detection experiments. However, the estimated values from previous works are far from agreeing with each other. In this work, we provide a well-defined observed sample with 1427 G \& K type main-sequence stars from the LAMOST spectroscopic survey, taking into account selection effects, volume completeness, and the stellar populations. We apply a vertical Jeans equation method containing a single exponential stellar disk, a razor thin gas disk, and a constant dark matter density distribution to the sample, and obtain a total surface mass density of $\rm {78.7 ^{+3.9}_{-4.7}\ M_{\odot}\ pc^{-2}}$ up to 1 kpc and a local dark matter density of $0.0159^{+0.0047}_{-0.0057}\,\rm M_{\odot}\,\rm pc^{-3}$. We find that the sampling density (i.e. number of stars per unit volume) of the spectroscopic data contributes to about two-thirds of the uncertainty in the estimated values. We discuss the effect of the tilt term in the Jeans equation and find it has little impact on our measurement. Other issues, such as a non-equilibrium component due to perturbations and contamination by the thick disk population, are also discussed.
  • A sample of 70 E+A galaxies are selected from 37, 206 galaxies in the second data release (DR2) of Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) according to the criteria for E+A galaxies defined by Goto, and each of these objects is further visually identified. In this sample, most objects are low redshift E+A galaxies with z < 0.25, and locate in the high latitude sky area with magnitude among 14 to 18 mag in g, r and i bands. A stellar population analysis for the whole sample indicates that the E+A galaxies are characterized by both young and old stellar populations (SPs), and the metal-rich SPs have relatively higher contributions than the metal-poor ones. Additionally, a morphological classification for these objects is performed based on the images taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS).
  • We perform a discrimination procedure with the spectral index diagram of TiO5 and CaH2+CaH3 to separate M giants from M dwarfs. Using the M giant spectra identified from the LAMOST DR1 with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we have successfully assembled a set of M giant templates, which show more reliable spectral features. Combining with the M dwarf/subdwarf templates in Zhong et al. (2015), we present an extended M-type templates library which includes not only M dwarfs with well-defined temperature and metallicity grid but also M giants with subtype from M0 to M6. Then, the template-fit algorithm were used to automatically identify and classify M giant stars from the LAMOST DR1. The result of M giant stars catalog is cross-matched with 2MASS JHKs and WISE W1/W2 infrared photometry. In addition, we calculated the heliocentric radial velocity of all M giant stars by using the cross-correlation method with the template spectrum in a zero-velocity restframe. Using the relationship between the absolute infrared magnitude MJ and our classified spectroscopic subtype, we derived the spectroscopic distance of M giants with uncertainties of about 40%. A catalog of 8639 M giants is provided. As an additional search result, we also present 101690 M dwarfs/subdwarfs catalog which were classified by our classification pipeline.
  • Symbiotic stars are interacting binary systems with the longest orbital periods. They are typically formed by a white dwarf, a red giant and a nebula. These objects are natural astrophysical laboratories for studying the evolution of binaries. Current estimates of the population of Milky Way symbiotic stars vary from 3000 up to 400000. However, the current census is less than 300. The Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) survey can obtain hundreds of thousands of stellar spectra per year, providing a good opportunity to search for new symbiotic stars. In this work we detect 4 of such binaries among 4,147,802 spectra released by the LAMOST, of which two are new identifications. The first is LAMOST J12280490-014825.7, considered to be an S-type halo symbiotic star. The second is LAMOST J202629.80+423652.0, a D-type symbiotic star.
  • In this work, we select the high signal-to-noise ratio spectra of stars from the LAMOST data andmap theirMK classes to the spectral features. The equivalentwidths of the prominent spectral lines, playing the similar role as the multi-color photometry, form a clean stellar locus well ordered by MK classes. The advantage of the stellar locus in line indices is that it gives a natural and continuous classification of stars consistent with either the broadly used MK classes or the stellar astrophysical parameters. We also employ a SVM-based classification algorithm to assignMK classes to the LAMOST stellar spectra. We find that the completenesses of the classification are up to 90% for A and G type stars, while it is down to about 50% for OB and K type stars. About 40% of the OB and K type stars are mis-classified as A and G type stars, respectively. This is likely owe to the difference of the spectral features between the late B type and early A type stars or between the late G and early K type stars are very weak. The relative poor performance of the automatic MK classification with SVM suggests that the directly use of the line indices to classify stars is likely a more preferable choice.
  • We present a sample of about 120,000 red clump candidates selected from the LAMOST DR2 catalog based on the empirical distribution model in the effective temperature vs. surface gravity plane. Although, in general, red clump stars are considered as the standard candle, they do not exactly stay in a narrow range of absolute magnitude, but may extend to more than 1 magnitude depending on their initial mass. Consequently, conventional oversimplified distance estimations with assumption of fixed luminosity may lead to systematic bias related to the initial mass or the age, which may potentially affect the study of the evolution of the Galaxy with red clump stars. We therefore employ an isochrone-based method to estimate the absolute magnitude of red clump stars from their observed surface gravities, effective temperatures, and metallicities. We verify that the estimation well removes the systematics and provide an initial mass/age independent distance estimates with accuracy less than 10%.
  • We present a method to estimate distances to stars with spectroscopically derived stellar parameters. The technique is a Bayesian approach with likelihood estimated via comparison of measured parameters to a grid of stellar isochrones, and returns a posterior probability density function for each star's absolute magnitude. This technique is tailored specifically to data from the Large Sky Area Multi-object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) survey. Because LAMOST obtains roughly 3000 stellar spectra simultaneously within each ~5-degree diameter "plate" that is observed, we can use the stellar parameters of the observed stars to account for the stellar luminosity function and target selection effects. This removes biasing assumptions about the underlying populations, both due to predictions of the luminosity function from stellar evolution modeling, and from Galactic models of stellar populations along each line of sight. Using calibration data of stars with known distances and stellar parameters, we show that our method recovers distances for most stars within ~20%, but with some systematic overestimation of distances to halo giants. We apply our code to the LAMOST database, and show that the current precision of LAMOST stellar parameters permits measurements of distances with ~40% error bars. This precision should improve as the LAMOST data pipelines continue to be refined.