• The Chinese Space Station Optical Survey (CSS-OS) is a major science project of the Space Application System of the China Manned Space Program. This survey is planned to perform both photometric imaging and slitless spectroscopic observations, and it will focus on different cosmological and astronomical goals. Most of these goals are tightly dependent on the accuracy of photometric redshift (photo-z) measurement, especially for the weak gravitational lensing survey as a main science driver. In this work, we assess if the current filter definition can provide accurate photo-z measurement to meet the science requirement. We use the COSMOS galaxy catalog to create a mock catalog for the CSS-OS. We compare different photo-z codes and fitting methods that using the spectral energy distribution (SED) template-fitting technique, and choose to use a modified LePhare code in photo-z fitting process. Then we investigate the CSS-OS photo-z accuracy in certain ranges of filter parameters, such as band position, width, and slope. We find that the current CSS-OS filter definition can achieve reasonably good photo-z results with sigma_z~0.02 and outlier fraction ~3%.
  • We present a detailed spectral analysis of the brightest Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) identified in the 7Ms Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) survey over a time span of 16 years. Using a model of an intrinsically absorbed power-law plus reflection, with possible soft excess and narrow Fe K$\alpha$ line, we perform a systematic X-ray spectral analysis, both on the total 7Ms exposure and in four different periods with lengths of 2-21 months. With this approach, we not only present the power-law slopes, column densities $N_H$, observed fluxes, and absorption-corrected 2-10~keV luminosities $L_X$ for our sample of AGNs, but also identify significant spectral variabilities among them on time scales of years. We find that the $N_H$ variabilities can be ascribed to two different types of mechanisms, either flux-driven or flux-independent. We also find that the correlation between the narrow Fe line EW and $N_H$ can be well explained by the continuum suppression with increasing $N_H$. Accounting for the sample incompleteness and bias, we measure the intrinsic distribution of $N_H$ for the CDF-S AGN population and present re-selected subsamples which are complete with respect to $N_H$. The $N_H$-complete subsamples enable us to decouple the dependences of $N_H$ on $L_X$ and on redshift. Combining our data with that from C-COSMOS, we confirm the anti-correlation between the average $N_H$ and $L_X$ of AGN, and find a significant increase of the AGN obscured fraction with redshift at any luminosity. The obscured fraction can be described as $f_{obscured}\thickapprox 0.42\ (1+z)^{0.60}$.
  • Angular power spectra of optical and infrared background anisotropies at wavelengths between 0.5 to 5 $\mu$m are a useful probe of faint sources present during reionization, in addition to faint galaxies and diffuse signals at low redshift. The cross-correlation of these fluctuations with backgrounds at other wavelengths can be used to separate some of these signals. A previous study on the cross-correlation between X-ray and $Spitzer$ fluctuations at 3.6 $\mu$m and 4.5 $\mu$m has been interpreted as evidence for direct collapse blackholes (DCBHs) present at $z > 12$. Here we return to this cross-correlation and study its wavelength dependence from 0.5 to 4.5 $\mu$m using $Hubble$ and $Spitzer$ data in combination with a subset of the 4 Ms $Chandra$ observations in GOODS-S/ECDFS. Our study involves five $Hubble$ bands at 0.6, 0.7, 0.85, 1.25 and 1.6 $\mu$m, and two $Spitzer$-IRAC bands at 3.6 $\mu$m and 4.5 $\mu$m. We confirm the previously seen cross-correlation between 3.6 $\mu$m (4.5 $\mu$m) and X-rays with 3.7$\sigma$ (4.2$\sigma$) and 2.7$\sigma$ (3.7$\sigma$) detections in the soft [0.5-2] keV and hard [2-8] keV X-ray bands, respectively, at angular scales above 20 arcseconds. The cross-correlation of X-rays with $Hubble$ is largely anticorrelated, ranging between the levels of 1.4$-$3.5$\sigma$ for all the $Hubble$ and X-ray bands. This lack of correlation in the shorter optical/NIR bands implies the sources responsible for the cosmic infrared background at 3.6 and 4.5~$\mu$m are at least partly dissimilar to those at 1.6 $\mu$m and shorter.
  • We exploit the 7 Ms \textit{Chandra} observations in the \chandra\,Deep Field-South (\mbox{CDF-S}), the deepest X-ray survey to date, coupled with CANDELS/GOODS-S data, to measure the total X-ray emission arising from 2076 galaxies at $3.5\leq z < 6.5$. This aim is achieved by stacking the \textit{Chandra} data at the positions of optically selected galaxies, reaching effective exposure times of $\geq10^9\mathrm{s}$. We detect significant ($>3.7\sigma$) X-ray emission from massive galaxies at $z\approx4$. We also report the detection of massive galaxies at $z\approx5$ at a $99.7\%$ confidence level ($2.7\sigma$), the highest significance ever obtained for X-ray emission from galaxies at such high redshifts. No significant signal is detected from galaxies at even higher redshifts. The stacking results place constraints on the BHAD associated with the known high-redshift galaxy samples, as well as on the SFRD at high redshift, assuming a range of prescriptions for X-ray emission due to X- ray binaries. We find that the X-ray emission from our sample is likely dominated by processes related to star formation. Our results show that low-rate mass accretion onto SMBHs in individually X-ray-undetected galaxies is negligible, compared with the BHAD measured for samples of X-ray detected AGN, for cosmic SMBH mass assembly at high redshift. We also place, for the first time, constraints on the faint-end of the AGN X-ray luminosity function ($\mathrm{logL_X\sim42}$) at $z>4$, with evidence for fairly flat slopes. The implications of all of these findings are discussed in the context of the evolution of the AGN population at high redshift.
  • We present results from deep X-ray stacking of >4000 high redshift galaxies from z~1 to 8 using the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) data, the deepest X-ray survey of the extragalactic sky to date. The galaxy samples were selected using the Lyman break technique based primarily on recent HST ACS and WFC3 observations. Based on such high specific star formation rates (sSFRs): log SFR/M* > -8.7, we expect that the observed properties of these LBGs are dominated by young stellar populations. The X-ray emission in LBGs, eliminating individually detected X-ray sources (potential AGN), is expected to be powered by X-ray binaries and hot gas. We find, for the first time, evidence of evolution in the X-ray/SFR relation. Based on X-ray stacking analyses for z<4 LBGs (covering ~90% of the Universe's history), we find that the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity evolves weakly with redshift (z) and SFR as log LX = 0.93 log (1+z) + 0.65 log SFR + 39.80. By comparing our observations with sophisticated X-ray binary population synthesis models, we interpret that the redshift evolution of LX/SFR is driven by metallicity evolution in HMXBs, likely the dominant population in these high sSFR galaxies. We also compare these models with our observations of X-ray luminosity density (total 2-10 keV luminosity per Mpc^3) and find excellent agreement. While there are no significant stacked detections at z>5, we use our upper limits from 5<z<8 LBGs to constrain the SMBH accretion history of the Universe around the epoch of reionization.
  • (Abridged) We report the discovery of an X-ray group of galaxies located at a high redshift of z=1.61 in the Chandra Deep Field South. The group is first identified as an extended X-ray source. We use a wealth of deep multi-wavelength data to identify the optical counterpart -- our red sequence finder detects a significant over-density of galaxies at z~1.6 and the brightest group galaxy is spectroscopically confirmed at z=1.61. We measure an X-ray luminosity of L_{0.1-2.4 keV}= 1.8\pm0.6 \times 10^{43} erg/s, which then translates into a group mass of 3.2\pm0.8 \times 10^{13} M_sun. This is the lowest mass group ever confirmed at z>1.5. The deep optical-nearIR images from CANDELS reveal that the group exhibits a surprisingly prominent red sequence. A detailed analysis of the spectral energy distributions of the group member candidates confirms that most of them are indeed passive galaxies. Furthermore, their structural parameters measured from the near-IR CANDELS images show that they are morphologically early-type. The newly identified group at z=1.61 is dominated by quiescent early-type galaxies and the group appears similar to those in the local Universe. One possible difference is the high fraction of AGN (38^{+23}_{-20}%), which might indicate a role for AGN in quenching. But, a statistical sample of high-z groups is needed to draw a general picture of groups at this redshift. Such a sample will hopefully be available in near future surveys.
  • Based on high-resolution ultraviolet spectroscopy obtained with FUSE and COS, we present new detections of O VI and N V emission from the black-hole X-ray binary (XRB) system LMC X-3. We also update the ephemeris of the XRB using recent radial velocity measurements obtained with the echelle spectrograph on the Magellan-Clay telescope. We observe significant velocity variability of the UV emission, and we find that the O VI and N V emission velocities follow the optical velocity curve of the XRB. Moreover, the O VI and N V intensities regularly decrease between binary phase = 0.5 and 1.0, which suggests that the source of the UV emission is increasingly occulted as the B star in the XRB moves from superior to inferior conjunction. These trends suggest that illumination of the B-star atmosphere by the intense X-ray emission from the accreting black hole creates a hot spot on one side of the B star, and this hot spot is the origin of the O VI and N V emission. However, the velocity semiamplitude of the ultraviolet emission, K_{UV}~180 km/s, is lower than the optical semiamplitude; this difference could be due to rotation of the B star. If our hypothesis about the origin of the highly ionized emission is correct, then careful analysis of the emission occultation could, in principle, constrain the inclination of the XRB and the mass of the black hole.
  • We report results from a systematic study of the spectral energy distribution (SED) and spectral evolution of XTE J1550--564 and H 1743--322 in outburst. The jets of both sources have been directly imaged at both radio and X-ray frequencies, which makes it possible to constrain the spectrum of the radiating electrons in the jets. We modelled the observed SEDs of the jet `blobs' with synchrotron emission alone and with synchrotron emission plus inverse Compton scattering. The results favor a pure synchrotron origin of the observed jet emission. Moreover, we found evidence that the shape of the electron spectral distribution is similar for all jet `blobs' seen. Assuming that this is the case for the jet as a whole, we then applied the synchrotron model to the radio spectrum of the total emission and extrapolated the results to higher frequencies. In spite of significant degeneracy in the fits, it seems clear that, while the synchrotron radiation from the jets can account for nearly 100% of the measured radio fluxes, it contributes little to the observed X-ray emission, when the source is relatively bright. In this case, the X-ray emission is most likely dominated by emission from the accretion flows. When the source becomes fainter, however, the jet emission becomes more important, even dominant, at X-ray energies. We also examined the spectral properties of the sources during outbursts and the correlation between the observed radio and X-ray variabilities. The implication of the results is discussed.
  • Emission spectra of hot accretion disks characteristic of advection dominated accretion flow (ADAF) models are investigated for comparison with the brightest ultra-luminous source, X-1, in the galaxy M82. If the spectral state of the source is similar to the low luminosity hard state of stellar mass black holes in our Galaxy, a fit to the {\it Chandra} X-ray spectrum and constraints from the radio and infrared upper limits, require a black hole mass in the range of $9 \times 10^4 - 5 \times 10^5 \msun$. Lower black hole masses ($\la 10^4 \msun$) are possible if M82 X-1 corresponds to the high luminosity hard state of Galactic black hole X-ray binary sources. Both of these spectrally degenerate hot accretion disk solutions lead to an intermediate mass black hole interpretation for M82 X-1. Since these solutions have different spectral variability with X-ray luminosity and predict different infrared emission, they can be distinguished by future off axis {\it Chandra} observations or simultaneous sensitive infrared detections.
  • The spectral energy distribution (SED) of TeV blazars peaks both at keV and TeV energies. The X-ray emission is generally believed to originate in the synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons (and positrons) in the jet of these sources, while the origin of the gamma-ray emission is still being debated. We report results from a systematic study of X-ray spectral variability of Mrk 421 and Mrk 501 during individual flares that last for several days, making use of some of the high-quality data that have recently become available. The X-ray spectra of the two sources fall on the opposite sides of the synchrotron peak of their respective SEDs, so they together may offer additional insights into the physical origin of X-ray variability. We modeled each of the time-resolved X-ray spectra over a {\em single} flare by adopting a homogeneous spatial distribution and an instantaneous power-law spectral distribution for the emitting particles. We focused on the variation of four key parameters: particle spectral index, maximum Lorentz factor, energy density, and magnetic field. While there is considerable degeneracy in the fits, we show that, in order to account for the X-ray spectral variability observed in Mrk 421, at least three of the parameters are required to vary in most cases, with the spectral index being one of them. The observations of Mrk 501 support the conclusion, although the quality of the data is not as good. We discuss the implications of the results.
  • The effectiveness of the thermal coupling of ions and electrons in the context of optically thin, hot accretion flows is investigated. In the limit of complete coupling, we focus on the one-temperature accretion flows. Based on a global analysis, the results are compared with two-temperature accretion flow models and with the observations of black hole sources. Many features are quite similar. That is, hot one-temperature solutions are found to exist for mass flow rates less than a critical value; i.e., $\dot{M}\la 10\alpha^2\dot{M}_{\rm Edd}$, where $\dot{M}_{\rm Edd}= L_{\rm Edd}/c^2$ is the Eddington accretion rate. At low mass flow rates, $\dot{M}\la 10^{-3}\alpha^2 \dot{M}_{\rm Edd}$, the solution is in the advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) regime. But at higher rates, radiative cooling is effective and is mainly balanced by advective {\em heating}, placing the solution in the regime of luminous hot accretion flow (LHAF). To test the viability of the one-temperature models, we have fitted the spectra of the two black hole sources, Sgr A* and XTE J1118+480, which have been examined successfully with two-temperature models. It is found that the one-temperature models do not provide acceptable fits to the multi-wavelength spectra of Sgr A* nor to XTE J1118+480 as a result of the higher temperatures characteristic of the one-temperature models. It is concluded that the thermal coupling of ions and electrons cannot be fully effective and that a two-temperature description is required in hot accretion flow solutions.
  • Motivated by the recent finding of hierarchical X-ray flaring phenomenon in Mrk 421, we conducted a systematic search for X-ray flares from Mrk 501, another well-known TeV blazar, by making use of the rich {\em RXTE} archival database. We detected flares over a wide range of timescales, from months down to minutes, as in the case of Mrk 421. However, the flares do not seem to occur nearly as frequently in Mrk 501 as in Mrk 421 on any of the timescales. The flaring hierarchy also seems apparent in Mrk 501, suggesting that it might be common among TeV blazars. The results seem to imply a scale-invariant physical origin of the flares (large or small). The X-ray spectrum of the source shows a general trend of hardening toward the peak of long-duration flares, with indication of spectral hysteresis, which is often seen in TeV blazars. However, the data are not of sufficient quality to allow us to draw definitive conclusions about spectral variability associated with more rapid but weaker flares. We critically examine a reported sub-hour X-ray flare from Mrk 501, in light of intense background flaring activity at the time of the observation, and concluded that the flare is likely an artifact. On the other hand, we did identify a rapid X-ray flare that appears to be real. It lasted only for about 15 minutes, during which the flux of the source varied by about 30%. Sub-structures are apparent in its profile, implying variabilities on even shorter timescales. Such rapid variabilities of Mrk 501 place severe constraints on the physical properties of the flaring region in the jet, which have serious implications on the emission models proposed for TeV blazars.