• We develop a unified theoretical picture for excitations in Mott systems, portraying both the heavy quasiparticle excitations and the Hubbard bands as features of an emergent Fermi liquid state formed in an extended Hilbert space, which is non-perturbatively connected to the physical system. This observation sheds light on the fact that even the incoherent excitations in strongly correlated matter often display a well defined Bloch character, with pronounced momentum dispersion. Furthermore, it indicates that the Mott point can be viewed as a topological transition, where the number of distinct dispersing bands displays a sudden change at the critical point. Our results, obtained from an appropriate variational principle, display also remarkable quantitative accuracy. This opens an exciting avenue for fast realistic modeling of strongly correlated materials.
  • The dependence of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) of MCo5 (M = Y, La) on the Coulomb correlations and strength of spin orbit (SO) interaction within the GGA + U scheme is investigated. A range of parameters suitable for the satisfactory description of key magnetic properties is determined. The origin of MAE in these materials is mostly related to the large orbital moment anisotropy of Co atoms on the 2c crystallographic site. Dependence of relativistic effects on Coulomb correlations, applicability of the second order perturbation theory for the description of MAE and effective screening of the SO interaction in these systems are discussed using a generalized virial theorem.
  • We derive an exact operatorial reformulation of the rotational invariant slave boson method and we apply it to describe the orbital differentiation in strongly correlated electron systems starting from first principles. The approach enables us to treat strong electron correlations, spin-orbit coupling and crystal field splittings on the same footing by exploiting the gauge invariance of the mean-field equations. We apply our theory to the archetypical nuclear fuel UO$_2$, and show that the ground state of this system displays a pronounced orbital differention within the $5f$ manifold, with Mott localized $\Gamma_8$ and extended $\Gamma_7$ electrons.
  • Structures and magnetic properties of Fe16-xCoxN2 are studied using adaptive genetic algorithm and first-principles calculations. We show that substituting Fe by Co in Fe16N2 with Co/Fe ratio smaller than 1 can greatly improve the magnetic anisotropy of the material. The magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy from first-principles calculations reaches 3.18 MJ/m3 (245.6 {\mu}eV per metal atom) for Fe12Co4N2, much larger than that of Fe16N2 and is one of the largest among the reported rare-earth free magnets. From our systematic crystal structure searches, we show that there is a structure transition from tetragonal Fe16N2 to cubic Co16N2 in Fe16-xCoxN2 as the Co concentration increases, which can be well explained by electron counting analysis. Different magnetic properties between the Fe-rich (x < 8) and Co-rich (x > 8) Fe16-xCoxN2 is closely related to the structural transition.
  • The insulating ground state of the 5d transition metal oxide CaIrO3 has been classified as a Mott-type insulator. Based on a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study with local, semilocal, and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals, we reveal that the Ir t2g states exhibit large splittings and one-dimensional electronic states along the c axis due to a tetragonal crystal field. Our hybrid DFT calculation adequately describes the antiferromagnetic (AFM) order along the c direction via a superexchange interaction between Ir4+ spins. Furthermore, the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) hybridizes the t2g states to open an insulating gap. These results indicate that CaIrO3 can be represented as a spin-orbit Slater insulator, driven by the interplay between a long-range AFM order and the SOC. Such a Slater mechanism for the gap formation is also demonstrated by the DFT + dynamical mean field theory calculation, where the metal-insulator transition and the paramagnetic to AFM phase transition are concomitant with each other.
  • We develop a new implementation of the Gutzwiller approximation (GA) and interface it with the local density approximation (LDA). This formulation enables us to study complex $4f$ and $5f$ systems. We perform calculations of praseodymium and $\alpha$-plutonium under pressure, which compare very well with the experiments. Our study of praseodymium indicates that both structure change and $f$-delocalization are important to obtain the correct phase diagram and, in particular, the pressure-induced volume-collapse transition. Our calculations of $\alpha$-plutonium indicate that, even though the $f$ electrons are delocalized in this phase, the electron-correlations affect substantially its electronic structure and thermodynamical properties.
  • We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study heavy fermion superconductor Ce2RhIn8. The Fermi surface is rather complicated and consists of several hole and electron pock- ets. We do not observe kz dispersion of Fermi sheets, which is consistent with 2D character of the electronic structure. Comparison of the ARPES data and band structure calculations points to a localized picture of f electrons. Our findings pave the way for understanding the transport and thermodynamical properties of this material.
  • Gutzwiller wavefunction is a physically well motivated trial wavefunction for describing correlated electron systems. In this work, a new approximation is introduced to facilitate evaluation of the expectation value of any operator within the Gutzwiller wavefunction formalism. The basic idea is to make use of a specially designed average over Gutzwiller wavefunction coefficients expanded in the many-body Fock space to approximate the ratio of expectation values between a Gutzwiller wavefunction and its underlying noninteracting wavefunction. To check with the standard Gutzwiller approximation (GA), we test its performance on single band systems and find quite interesting properties. On finite systems, we noticed that it gives superior performance than GA, while on infinite systems it asymptotically approaches GA. Analytic analysis together with numerical tests are provided to support this claimed asymptotic behavior. At the end, possible improvements on the approximation and its generalization towards multiband systems are illustrated and discussed.
  • We argue that, because of the quantum-entanglement, the local physics of the strongly-correlated materials at zero temperature is described in very good approximation by a simple generalized Gibbs distribution, which depends on a relatively small number local quantum thermodynamical potentials. We demonstrate that our statement is exact in certain limits, and we perform numerical calculations of the iron compounds FeSe and FeTe and of the elemental cerium by employing the Gutzwiller Approximation (GA) that strongly support our theory in general.
  • We report a first-principles study of the electronic structure of functionalized graphene nano-ribbon (aGNRs-f) by organic functional group (CH2C6H5) and find that CH2C6H5 functionalized group does not produce any electronic states in the gap and the band gap is direct. By changing both the density of the organic functional group and the width of the aGNRs-f, a band gap tuning exhibits a fine three family behavior through the side effect. Meanwhile, the carriers at conduction band minimum and valence band maximum are located in both CH2C6H5 and aGNR regions when the density of the CH2C6H5 is big; while they distribute dominantly in aGNR conversely. The band gap modulation effects make the aGNRs-f good candidates with high quantum efficiency and much more wavelength choices range from 750 to 93924 nm both for lasers, light emitting diodes and photo detectors due to the direct band gap and small carrier effective masses.