• Hiroaki Aihara, Robert Armstrong, Steven Bickerton, James Bosch, Jean Coupon, Hisanori Furusawa, Yusuke Hayashi, Hiroyuki Ikeda, Yukiko Kamata, Hiroshi Karoji, Satoshi Kawanomoto, Michitaro Koike, Yutaka Komiyama, Robert H. Lupton, Sogo Mineo, Hironao Miyatake, Satoshi Miyazaki, Tomoki Morokuma, Yoshiyuki Obuchi, Yukie Oishi, Yuki Okura, Paul A. Price, Tadafumi Takata, Manobu M. Tanaka, Masayuki Tanaka, Yoko Tanaka, Tomohisa Uchida, Fumihiro Uraguchi, Yousuke Utsumi, Shiang-Yu Wang, Yoshihiko Yamada, Hitomi Yamanoi, Naoki Yasuda, Nobuo Arimoto, Masashi Chiba, Francois Finet, Hiroki Fujimori, Seiji Fujimoto, Junko Furusawa, Tomotsugu Goto, Andy Goulding, James E. Gunn, Yuichi Harikane, Takashi Hattori, Masao Hayashi, Krzysztof G. Helminiak, Ryo Higuchi, Chiaki Hikage, Paul T.P. Ho, Bau-Ching Hsieh, Kuiyun Huang, Song Huang, Masatoshi Imanishi, Ikuru Iwata, Anton T. Jaelani, Hung-Yu Jian, Nobunari Kashikawa, Nobuhiko Katayama, Takashi Kojima, Akira Konno, Shintaro Koshida, Haruka Kusakabe, Alexie Leauthaud, C.-H. Lee, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Rachel Mandelbaum, Yoshiki Matsuoka, Elinor Medezinski, Shoken Miyama, Rieko Momose, Anupreeta More, Surhud More, Shiro Mukae, Ryoma Murata, Hitoshi Murayama, Tohru Nagao, Fumiaki Nakata, Hiroko Niikura, Atsushi J. Nishizawa, Masamune Oguri, Nobuhiro Okabe, Yoshiaki Ono, Masato Onodera, Masafusa Onoue, Masami Ouchi, Tae-Soo Pyo, Takatoshi Shibuya, Kazuhiro Shimasaku, Melanie Simet, Joshua Speagle, David N. Spergel, Michael A. Strauss, Yuma Sugahara, Naoshi Sugiyama, Yasushi Suto, Nao Suzuki, Philip J. Tait, Masahiro Takada, Tsuyoshi Terai, Yoshiki Toba, Edwin L. Turner, Hisakazu Uchiyama, Keiichi Umetsu, Yuji Urata, Tomonori Usuda, Sherry Yeh, Suraphong Yuma
    The Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP) is a three-layered imaging survey aimed at addressing some of the most outstanding questions in astronomy today, including the nature of dark matter and dark energy. The survey has been awarded 300 nights of observing time at the Subaru Telescope and it started in March 2014. This paper presents the first public data release of HSC-SSP. This release includes data taken in the first 1.7 years of observations (61.5 nights) and each of the Wide, Deep, and UltraDeep layers covers about 108, 26, and 4 square degrees down to depths of i~26.4, ~26.5, and ~27.0 mag, respectively (5sigma for point sources). All the layers are observed in five broad bands (grizy), and the Deep and UltraDeep layers are observed in narrow bands as well. We achieve an impressive image quality of 0.6 arcsec in the i-band in the Wide layer. We show that we achieve 1-2 per cent PSF photometry (rms) both internally and externally (against Pan-STARRS1), and ~10 mas and 40 mas internal and external astrometric accuracy, respectively. Both the calibrated images and catalogs are made available to the community through dedicated user interfaces and database servers. In addition to the pipeline products, we also provide value-added products such as photometric redshifts and a collection of public spectroscopic redshifts. Detailed descriptions of all the data can be found online. The data release website is https://hsc-release.mtk.nao.ac.jp/.
  • We present the deepest optical images of the COSMOS field based on a joint dataset taken with Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) by the HSC Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) team and the University of Hawaii (UH). The COSMOS field is one of the key extragalactic fields with a wealth of deep, multi-wavelength data. However, the current optical data are not sufficiently deep to match with, e.g., the UltraVista data in the near-infrared. The SSP team and UH have joined forces to produce very deep optical images of the COSMOS field by combining data from both teams. The coadd images reach depths of g=27.8, r=27.7, i=27.6, z=26.8, and y=26.2 mag at 5 sigma for point sources based on flux uncertainties quoted by the pipeline and they cover essentially the entire COSMOS 2 square degree field. The seeing is between 0.6 and 0.9 arcsec on the coadds. We perform several quality checks and confirm that the data are of science quality; ~2% photometry and 30 mas astrometry. This accuracy is identical to the Public Data Release 1 from HSC-SSP. We make the joint dataset including fully calibrated catalogs of detected objects available to the community at https://hsc-release.mtk.nao.ac.jp/.
  • In this paper, we describe the optical imaging data processing pipeline developed for the Subaru Telescope's Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) instrument. The HSC Pipeline builds on the prototype pipeline being developed by the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope's Data Management system, adding customizations for HSC, large-scale processing capabilities, and novel algorithms that have since been reincorporated into the LSST codebase. While designed primarily to reduce HSC Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) data, it is also the recommended pipeline for reducing general-observer HSC data. The HSC pipeline includes high level processing steps that generate coadded images and science-ready catalogs as well as low-level detrending and image characterizations.
  • We describe a weak lensing view of the downsizing of star forming galaxies based on cross correlating a weak lensing ($\kappa$) map with a predicted map constructed from a redshift survey. Moderately deep and high resolution images with Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam covering the 4 deg^2 DLS F2 field provide a $\kappa$ map with 1 arcmin resolution. A dense complete redshift survey of the F2 field including 12,705 galaxies with $R\leq20.6$ is the basis for construction of the predicted map. The zero-lag cross-correlation between the \kappa and predicted maps is significant at the $30\sigma$ level. The width of the cross-correlation peak is comparable with the angular scale of rich cluster at $z\sim0.3$, the median depth of the redshift survey. Slices of the predicted map in $\delta{z} = 0.05$ redshift bins enable exploration of the impact of structure as a function of redshift. The zero-lag normalised cross-correlation has significant local maxima at redshifts coinciding with known massive X-ray clusters. Even in slices where there are no known massive clusters, there is significant signal in the cross-correlation originating from lower mass groups that trace the large-scale of the universe. Spectroscopic $D_n4000$ measurements enable division of the sample into star-forming and quiescent populations. The significance of the cross-correlation with structure containing star-forming galaxies increases with redshift from $5\sigma$ at $z = 0.3$ to $7 \sigma$ at $z = 0.5$. The weak lensing results are consistent with the downsizing view of galaxy evolution established on the basis of many other independent studies.
  • We present the first results of a wide-field mapping survey of the M81 group conducted with Hyper Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. Our deep photometry reaches $\sim2$ magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch (RGB) and reveals the spatial distribution of both old and young stars over an area of $\sim 100\times115$ kpc at the distance of M81. The young stars ($\sim30-160$ Myr old) closely follow the neutral hydrogen distribution and can be found in a stellar stream between M81 and NGC\,3077 and in numerous outlying stellar associations, including the known concentrations of Arp's Loop, Holmberg\,IX, an arc in the halo of M82, BK3N, and the Garland. Many of these groupings do not have counterparts in the RGB maps, suggesting they may be genuinely young systems. Our survey also reveals for the first time the very extended ($\geq 2\times \rm{R_{25}}$) halos of RGB stars around M81, M82 and NGC\,3077, as well as faint tidal streams that link these systems. The halos of M82 and NGC\,3077 exhibit highly disturbed morphologies, presumably a consequence of the recent gravitational encounter and their ongoing disruption. While the halos of M81, NGC\,3077 and the inner halo of M82 have the similar $(g-i)_{0}$ colors, the outer halo of M82 is significantly bluer indicating it is more metal-poor. Remarkably, our deep panoramic view of the M81 group demonstrates that the complexity long-known to be present in HI is equally matched in the low surface brightness stellar component.
  • We present the photometric properties of a sample of infrared (IR) bright dust obscured galaxies (DOGs). Combining wide and deep optical images obtained with the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) on the Subaru Telescope and all-sky mid-IR (MIR) images taken with Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we discovered 48 DOGs with $i - K_\mathrm{s} > 1.2$ and $i - [22] > 7.0$, where $i$, $K_\mathrm{s}$, and [22] represent AB magnitude in the $i$-band, $K_\mathrm{s}$-band, and 22 $\mu$m, respectively, in the GAMA 14hr field ($\sim$ 9 deg$^2$). Among these objects, 31 ($\sim$ 65 %) show power-law spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in the near-IR (NIR) and MIR regime, while the remainder show a NIR bump in their SEDs. Assuming that the redshift distribution for our DOGs sample is Gaussian, with mean and sigma $z$ = 1.99 $\pm$ 0.45, we calculated their total IR luminosity using an empirical relation between 22 $\mu$m luminosity and total IR luminosity. The average value of the total IR luminosity is (3.5 $\pm$ 1.1) $\times$ $10^{13}$ L$_{\odot}$, which classifies them as hyper-luminous infrared galaxies (HyLIRGs). We also derived the total IR luminosity function (LF) and IR luminosity density (LD) for a flux-limited subsample of 18 DOGs with 22 $\mu$m flux greater than 3.0 mJy and with $i$-band magnitude brighter than 24 AB magnitude. The derived space density for this subsample is log $\phi$ = -6.59 $\pm$ 0.11 [Mpc$^{-3}$]. The IR LF for DOGs including data obtained from the literature is well fitted by a double-power law. The derived lower limit for the IR LD for our sample is $\rho_{\mathrm{IR}}$ $\sim$ 3.8 $\times$ 10$^7$ [L$_{\odot}$ Mpc$^{-3}$] and its contributions to the total IR LD, IR LD of all ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), and that of all DOGs are $>$ 3 %, $>$ 9 %, and $>$ 15 %, respectively.
  • We take deep images of four ultra faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, Canes Venatici I (CVn I), Bootes I (Boo I), Canes Venatici II (CVn II), and Leo IV using the Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. The colour-magitude diagrams (CMDs) extend below the main sequence turn-offs (MSTOs) and yield measurements of the ages of stellar populations. The stellar populations of faint three galaxies, Boo I, CVn II and Leo IV dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) are estimated as old as a Galactic globular cluster M92. We confirm that Boo I dSph has no intrinsic colour spread in the MSTO, and no spatial difference in the CMD morphology, which indicates that Boo I dSph is composed of an old single stellar population. One of the brightest UFDs, CVn I dSph, shows a relatively younger age (-12.6 Gyr) with respect to Boo I, CVn II, and Leo IV dSphs, and the distribution of red horizontal branch (HB) stars is more concentrated toward the centre than that of blue HB stars, suggesting that the galaxy contains complex stellar populations. Boo I and CVn I dSphs show the elongated and distorted shapes. CVn II dSph has the smallest tidal radius as a Milky Way satellite and has distorted shape, while Leo IV dSph shows less concentrated spherical shape. The simple stellar population of faint UFDs indicates that the gases in their progenitors were removed more effectively than those of brighter dSphs at an occurrence of their initial star formation. This is reasonable if the progenitors of UFDs belong to the less massive halos than those of brighter dSphs.
  • We present deep and wide V, I CCD photometry of Ursa Major I (UMa I) dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) in Local Group. The images of the galaxy were taken by Subaru/Suprime-Cam wide field camera, covering a field of 34\arcmin $\times$ 27\arcmin located at the centre of the galaxy. Colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) of the UMa I dSph shows a steep and narrow red giant branch (RGB), blue and red horizontal branch (HB), and main sequence (MS) stars. A well-defined main sequence turn-off (MSTO) is found to be located at V$_{0,MSTO}\sim$23.5 mag. The distance modulus is derived as $(m-M)_0=19.93\pm0.1$ (corresponding to a distance D$=96.8\pm4$ kpc) from the V-band magnitude of the horizontal branch (V$_{0,HB}=20.45\pm0.02$). The mean metallicity of the RGB stars is estimated by the V$-$I colour to [Fe/H]$\sim-2.0$. The turn-off age estimated by overlaying the theoretical isochrones reveals that most of stars in the UMa I dSph are formed at very early epoch ($\sim12$Gyrs ago). The isopleth map of stellar number density of the UMa I dSph, based upon the resolved star counts of MS, RGB, HB stars as well as blue stragglers (BS), shows that the morphology of the UMa I dSph is quite irregular and distorted, suggesting that the galaxy is in a process of disruption. The very old and metal-poor nature of the stellar population implies that the star formation history of this newly discoverd faint dSph may have been different from other well-known `classical' dSphs, which show significant stellar population of intermediate age. The stellar population of the UMa I dSph closely resembles that of Galactic old metal-poor globular cluster, but its size is typical of Galactic dSphs (r$_{e}$=188 [pc], r$_{1/2}$=300 [pc]), and the shape of its spatial density contours suggests that it is undergoing tidal disruption.
  • We present long-slit spectroscopy of the elliptical galaxy M32, obtained with the 8-m Subaru telescope at Mauna Kea, the 1.5-m Tillinghast telescope at the F. L. Whipple Observatory, and the 4-m Mayall telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. The spectra cover the Lick index red spectral region as well as higher order Balmer lines in the blue. Spectra have been taken with the slit off-set from the nucleus to avoid scattered light contamination from the bright nucleus of M32. An analysis of numerous absorption features, particularly involving the H$\gamma$ and H$\beta$ Balmer lines, reveals that systematic radial trends are evident in the integrated spectrum of M32. Population synthesis models indicate a radial change in both the age and chemical composition of the light-weighted mean stellar population in M32, from the nucleus out to 33", i.e., approximately 1.0 effective radius, R_e. Specifically, the light-weighted mean stellar population at 1 R_e is older, by \~3 Gyr, and more metal-poor, by ~-0.25 dex in [Fe/H], t han the central value of ~4 Gyr and [Fe/H]~0.0. We show that this apparent population trend cannot be attributed to a varying contribution from either hot stars or emission line contamination. The increase in age and decrease in metal-abundance with radius are sufficiently well-matched to explain the flat radial color profiles previously observed in M32. In addition, the ratio of Mg to Fe abundance, [Mg/Fe], increases from ~-0.25 in the nucleus to ~-0.08 at 1 R_e. Finally, we find spuriously pronounced line strength gradients in the Mayall data that are an artifact of scattered light from the bright nucleus. Scattered light issues may explain the lack of consistency among previously published studies of radial line strength gradients in M32.
  • We explore possible correlations between light profile shapes, as parameterized by the Sersic index or the concentration index C_re(1/3), and relevant stellar population parameters in early-type galaxies. Mean luminosity weighted ages, metallicities and abundance ratios were obtained from spectra of very high signal-to-noise and stellar population models that synthesize galaxy spectra at the resolution given by their velocity dispersions, in combination with an age indicator that is virtually free of the effects of metallicity. We do not find any significant correlation between the Sersic index (or C_re(1/3)) and mean age or metallicity, but a strong positive correlation of the shape parameters with [Mg/Fe] abundance ratio. This dependence is as strong as the [Mg/Fe] vs. velocity dispersion and C_re(1/3) vs. velocity dispersion relations. We speculate that early-type galaxies settle up their structure on time-scales in agreement with those imposed by their [Mg/Fe] ratios. This suggest that the global structure of larger galaxies, with larger [Mg/Fe] ratios and shorter time-scales, was already at place at high z, without experiencing a significant time evolution.