• We present an X-ray study of the GeV gamma-ray supernova remnant (SNR) HB 21 with Suzaku. HB 21 is interacting with molecular clouds and the faintest in the GeV band among known GeV SNRs. We discovered strong radiative recombination continua of Si and S from the center of the remnant, which provide the direct evidence of a recombining plasma (RP). The total emission can be explained with the RP and ionizing plasma components. The electron temperature and recombination timescale of the RP component were estimated as 0.17 (0.15-0.18) keV and 3.2 (2.0-4.8) $\times$ 10$^{11}$ s cm$^{-3}$, respectively. The estimated age of the RP (RP age; $\sim$ 170 kyr) is the longest among known recombining GeV SNRs, because of very low density of electrons ($\sim$ 0.05 cm$^{-3}$). We have examined dependencies of GeV spectral indices on each of RP ages and SNR diameters for nine recombining GeV SNRs. Both showed possible positive correlations, indicating that both the parameters can be good indicators of properties of accelerated protons, for instance, degree of escape from the SNR shocks. A possible scenario for a process of proton escape is introduced; interaction with molecular clouds makes weaker magnetic turbulence and cosmic-ray protons escape, simultaneously cooling down the thermal electrons and generate an RP.
  • The Suzaku data of the highly variable magnetar 1E 1547.0$-$5408, obtained during the 2009 January activity, were reanalyzed. The 2.07 s pulsation of the 15--40 keV emission detected with the HXD was found to be phase modulated, with a period of $36.0^{+4.5}_{-2.5}$ ks and an amplitude of $0.52 \pm 0.14$ s. The modulation waveform is suggested to be more square-wave like rather than sinusoidal. While the effect was confirmed with the 10--14 keV XIS data, the modulation amplitude decreased towards lower energies, becoming consistent with 0 below 4 keV. After the case of 4U 0142+61, this makes the 2nd example of this kind of behavior detected from magnetars. The effect can be interpreted as a manifestation of free precession of this magnetar, which is suggested to be oblately deformed under the presence of strong toroidal field of $\sim 10^{16}$ G.
  • Active shielding is an effective technique to reduce background signals in hard X-ray detectors and to enable observing darker sources with high sensitivity in space. Usually the main detector is covered with some shield detectors made of scintillator crystals such as BGO (Bi$_4$Ge$_3$O$_{12}$), and the background signals are filtered out using anti-coincidence among them. Japanese X-ray observing satellites "Suzaku" and "ASTRO-H" employed this technique in their hard X-ray instruments observing at > 10 keV. In the next generation X-ray satellites, such as the NGHXT proposal, a single hybrid detector is expected to cover both soft (1-10 keV) and hard (> 10 keV) X-rays for effectiveness. However, present active shielding is not optimized for the soft X-ray band, 1-10 keV. For example, Bi and Ge, which are contained in BGO, have their fluorescence emission lines around 10 keV. These lines appear in the background spectra obtained by ASTRO-H Hard X-ray Imager, which are non-negligible in its observation energy band of 5-80 keV. We are now optimizing the design of active shields for both soft and hard X-rays at the same time. As a first step, we utilized a BGO crystal as a default material, and measured the L lines of Bi and K lines of Ge from it using the X-ray SOIPIX, "XRPIX".