• Tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) is a wide-gap semiconductor which has important technological applications. Despite the enormous efforts from both experimental and theoretical studies, the ground state crystal structure of Ta2O5 is not yet uniquely determined. Based on first-principles calculations in combination with evolutionary algorithm, we identify a triclinic phase of Ta2O5, which is energetically much more stable than any phases or structural models reported previously. Characterization of the static and dynamical properties of the new phase reveals the common features shared with previous metastable phases of Ta2O5. In particular, we show that the d-spacing of ~ 3.8 {\AA} found in the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of many previous experimental works, is actually the radius of the second Ta-Ta coordination shell as defined by radial distribution functions.
  • We identify by ab initio calculations a new type of three-dimensional carbon allotropes constructed by inserting acetylenic or diacetylenic bonds into a body-centered cubic C$_8$ lattice. The resulting $sp+sp^3$-hybridized cubane-yne and cubane-diyne structures consisting of C$_8$ cubes can be characterized as a cubic crystalline modification of linear carbon chains, but energetically more favorable than the simplest linear carbyne chain and the cubic tetrahedral diamond and yne-diamond consisting of C$_4$ tetrahedrons. Electronic band calculations indicate that these new carbon allotropes are semiconductors with an indirect band gap of 3.08 eV for cubane-yne and 2.53 eV for cubane-diyne. The present results establish a new type of carbon phases consisting of C$_8$ cubes and offer insights into their outstanding structural and electronic properties.
  • We have carried out a density functional theory study on the structures of DMSO clusters and analysed the structure and their stability using molecular electrostatic potential and quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules (QTAIM). The ground state geometry of the DMSO clusters, prefer to exist in ouroboros shape. Pair wise interaction energy calculation show the interaction between methyl groups of adjacent DMSO molecules and a destabilization is is created by the methyl groups which are away from each other. Molecular electrostatic potential analysis shows the existence of hole on the odd numbered clusters, which helps in their highly directional growth. QTAIM analysis show the existence of two intermolecular hydrogen bonds, of type SOC hydrogen bonds and methyl CHC dihydrogen bonds. The computed and Laplacian values were all positive for the intermolecular bonds, supporting the existence of noncovalent interactions. The computed ellipticity for the dihydrogen bonds have values > 2, which confirms the delocalization of electron, are mainly due to the hydrogen-hydrogen interactions of methyl groups. A plot of total hydrogen bonding energy vs the observed total local electron density shows linearity with correlation coefficient of near unity, which indicates the cooperative effects of intermolecular dihydrogen HH bonds.
  • Recently, two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides and nitrides, namely, MXenes have attracted lots of attention for electronic and energy storage applications. Due to a large spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and the existence of a Dirac-like band at the Fermi energy, it has been theoretically proposed that some of the MXenes will be topological insulators (TIs). Up to now, all of the predicted TI MXenes belong to transition metal carbides, whose transition metal atom is W, Mo or Cr. Here, on the basis of first-principles and Z2 index calculations, we demonstrate that some of the MXene nitrides can also be TIs. We find that Ti3N2F2 is a 2D TI, whereas Zr3N2F2 is a semimetal with nontrivial band topology and can be turned into a 2D TI when the lattice is stretched. We also find that the tensile strain can convert Hf3N2F2 semiconductor into a 2D TI. Since Ti is one of the mostly used transition metal element in the synthesized MXenes, we expect that our prediction can advance the future application of MXenes as TI devices.
  • The oriented attachment (OA) of nanoparticles is an important mechanism for the synthesis of the crystals of inorganic functional materials, and the formation of natural minerals. For years it has been generally acknowledged that OA is a physical process, i.e., particle alignments and interface fusion via mass diffusion, not involving the formation of new substances. Hence, the obtained crystals maintain identical crystallographic structures and chemical constituents to those of the precursor particles. Here we report a chemical reaction directed OA growth, through which Y2(CO3)3.2H2O nanoparticles are converted to single-crystalline double-carbonates (e.g., NaY(CO3)2.6H2O). The dominant role of OA growth is supported by our first-principles calculations. Such a new OA mechanism enriches the aggregation-based crystal growth theory.
  • Emergent Dirac fermion states underlie many intriguing properties of graphene, and the search for them constitute one strong motivation to explore two-dimensional (2D) allotropes of other elements. Phosphorene, the ultrathin layers of black phosphorous, has been a subject of intense investigations recently, and it was found that other group-Va elements could also form 2D layers with similar puckered lattice structure. Here, by a close examination of their electronic band structure evolution, we discover two types of Dirac fermion states emerging in the low-energy spectrum. One pair of (type-I) Dirac points is sitting on high-symmetry lines, while two pairs of (type-II) Dirac points are located at generic $k$-points, with different anisotropic dispersions determined by the reduced symmetries at their locations. Such fully-unpinned (type-II) 2D Dirac points are discovered for the first time. In the absence of spin-orbit coupling, we find that each Dirac node is protected by the sublattice symmetry from gap opening, which is in turn ensured by any one of three point group symmetries. The spin-orbit coupling generally gaps the Dirac nodes, and for the type-I case, this drives the system into a quantum spin Hall insulator phase. We suggest possible ways to realize the unpinned Dirac points in strained phosphorene.
  • Two-dimensional (2D) topological insulator (TI) have been recognized as a new class of quantum state of matter. They are distinguished from normal 2D insulators with their nontrivial band-structure topology identified by the $Z_2$ number as protected by time-reversal symmetry (TRS). 2D TIs have intriguing spin-velocity locked conducting edge states and insulating properties in the bulk. In the edge states, the electrons with opposite spins propagate in opposite directions and the backscattering is fully prohibited when the TRS is conserved. This leads to quantized dissipationless "two-lane highway" for charge and spin transportation and promises potential applications. Up to now, only very few 2D systems have been discovered to possess this property. The lack of suitable material obstructs the further study and application. Here, by using first-principles calculations, we propose that the functionalized MXene with oxygen, M$_2$CO$_2$ (M=W, Mo and Cr), are 2D TIs with the largest gap of 0.194 eV in W case. They are dynamically stable and natively antioxidant. Most importantly, they are very likely to be easily synthesized by recent developed selective chemical etching of transition-metal carbides (MAX phase). This will pave the way to tremendous applications of 2D TIs, such as "ideal" conducting wire, multifunctional spintronic device, and the realization of topological superconductivity and Majorana modes for quantum computing.
  • Graphene, a two dimensional (2D) carbon sheet, acquires many of its amazing properties from the Dirac point nature of its electronic structures with negligible spin-orbit coupling. Extending to 3D space, graphene networks with negative curvature, called Mackay-Terrones crystals (MTC), have been proposed and experimentally explored, yet their topological properties remain to be discovered. Based on the first-principle calculations, we report an all-carbon MTC with topologically non-trivial electronic states by exhibiting node-lines in bulk. When the node-lines are projected on to surfaces to form circles, "drumhead" like flat surface bands nestled inside of the circles are formed. The bulk node-line can evolve into 3D Dirac point in the absence of inversion symmetry, which has shown its plausible existence in recent experiments.
  • The lattice relaxation in oxygen-deficient Ta2O5 is investigated using first-principles calculations. The presence of a charge-neutral oxygen vacancy can result in a long-ranged lattice relaxation which extends beyond 18 {\AA} from the vacancy site. The lattice relaxation has significant effects on the vacancy formation energy as well as the electronic structures. The long-ranged behavior of the lattice relaxation is explained in terms of the Hellmann-Feynman forces and the potential energy surface related to the variation of Ta-O bond lengths.
  • We study the magnitude of zero-point vibration in one-component crystals. For the crystals whose constituent atoms share the same bonding geometry, we prove the existence of a characteristic temperature, T0, at which the magnitude of zero-point vibrations equals to that of the excited vibrations. Within the Debye model T0 is found to be ~1/3 of the Debye temperature. The results are demonstrated in realistic systems.
  • We report observation of 90-degree ferroelectric domain structures in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of epitaxially-grown films of PbTiO3. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on first-principles effective Hamiltonian of bulk PbTiO3, we corroborate the occurance of such domains showing that it arises as metastable states only in cooling simulations (as the temperature is lowered) and establish characteristic stability of 90-degree domain structures in PbTiO3. In contrast, such domains do not manifest in similar simulations of BaTiO3. Through a detailed analysis based on energetics and comparison between PbTiO3 and BaTiO3, we find that 90-degree domain structures are energetically favorable only in the former, and the origin of their stability lies in the polarization-strain coupling. Our analysis suggests that they may form in BaTiO3 due to special boundary condition and/or defect-related inhomogeneities.
  • Based on the first principles calculation combined with quasi-harmonic approximation, in this work we focus on the analysis of temperature dependent lattice geometries, thermal expansion coefficients, elastic constants and ultimate strength of graphene and graphyne. For the linear thermal expansion coefficient, both graphene and graphyne show a negative region in the low temperature regime. This coefficient increases up to be positive at high temperatures. Graphene has superior mechanical properties, with Young modulus E11=371.0 N/m, E22=378.2 N/m and ultimate tensile strength of 119.2 GPa at room temperature. Based on our analysis, it is found that graphene's mechanical properties have strong resistance against temperature increase up to 1200 K. Graphyne also shows good mechanical properties, with Young modulus E11=224.7 N/m, E22=223.9 N/m and ultimate tensile strength of 81.2 GPa at room temperature, but graphyne's mechanical properties have a weaker resistance with respect to the increase of temperature than that of graphene.
  • To study temperature dependent elastic constants, a new computational method is proposed by combining continuum elasticity theory and first principles calculations. A Gibbs free energy function with one variable with respect to strain at given temperature and pressure was derived, hence the full minimization of the Gibbs free energy with respect to temperature and lattice parameters can be put into effective operation by using first principles. Therefore, with this new theory, anisotropic thermal expansion and temperature dependent elastic constants can be obtained for crystals with arbitrary symmetry. In addition, we apply our method to hexagonal beryllium, hexagonal diamond and cubic diamond to illustrate its general applicability.
  • In order to study a magnetic principle of carbon based materials, multiple spin state of zigzag edge modified graphene molecules are analyzed by the first principle density functional theory to select suitable modification element. Radical carbon modified C64H17 shows that the highest spin state is most stable, which arises from two up-spin's tetrahedral molecular orbital configuration at zigzag edge. In contrast, oxygen modified C59O5H17 show the lowest spin state to be most stable due to four spins cancellation at oxygen site. Boron modified C59B5H22 have no {\pi}-molecular orbit at boron site to bring stable molecular spin state to be the lowest one. Whereas, C59N5H2 have two {\pi}-electrons, where spins cancel each other to give the stable lowest spin state. Silicon modified C59Si5H27 and Phosphorus modified C59P5H22 show curved molecular geometry due to a large atom insertion at zigzag site, which also bring complex spin distribution. Radical carbon and dihydrogenated carbon modification are promising candidates for designing carbon-based magnetic materials.
  • In order to explain room-temperature ferromagnetism of graphite-like materials, this paper offers a new magnetic counting rule of radical carbon zigzag edge nano graphene. Multiple spin state analysis based on a density function theory shows that the highest spin state is most stable. Energy difference with next spin state overcomes kT=2000K suggesting a room-temperature ferromagnetism. Local spin density at a radical carbon shows twice a large up-spin cloud which comes from two orbital with tetrahedral configuration occupied by up-up spins. This leads a new magnetic counting rule to give a localized spin Sz=+2/2 to one radical carbon site, whereas Sz= -1/2 to the nearest carbon site. Applied to five model molecules, we could confirm this magnetic counting rule. In addition, we enhanced such concept to oxygen substituted zigzag edge occupied by four electrons.
  • Using first-principle density functional theory, we investigated the hydrogen storage capacity of Li functionalized adamantane. We showed that if one of the acidic hydrogen atoms of adamantane is replaced by Li/Li+, the resulting complex is activated and ready to adsorb hydrogen molecules at a high gravimetric weight percent of around ~ 7.0 %. Due to polarization of hydrogen molecules under the induced electric field generated by positively charged Li/Li+, they are adsorbed on ADM.Li/Li+ complexes with an average binding energy of ~ -0.15 eV/H2, desirable for hydrogen storage applications. We also examined the possibility of the replacement of a larger number of acidic hydrogen atoms of adamantane by Li/Li+ and the possibility of aggregations of formed complexes in experiments. The stabilities of the proposed structures were investigated by calculating vibrational spectra and doing MD simulations.
  • Several experiments have recently found room-temperature ferromagnetism in graphite-like carbon based materials. This paper offers a model explaining such ferromagnetism by using an asymmetric nano-graphene. Our first typical model is C48H24 graphene molecule, which has three dihydrogenated (-CH2) zigzag edges. There are several multiple spin states competing for stable minimum energy in the same atomic topology. Both molecular orbital and density function theory methods indicate that the quartet state(S=3/2) is more stable than that of doublet (S=1/2), which means that larger saturation magnetization will be achieved. We also enhanced this molecule to an infinite length ribbon having many (-CH2) edges. Similar results were obtained where the highest spin state was more stable than lower spin state. In contrast, a nitrogen substituted (-NH) molecule C45N3H21 demonstrated opposite results. that is, the lowest spin state(S=1/2) is more stable than that of highest one(S=3/2), which arises from the slight change in atom position.
  • Room temperature ferromagnetic materials composed only by light elements like carbon, hydrogen and/or nitrogen, so called carbon magnet, are very attractive for creating new material categories both in science and industry. Recently several experiments suggest ferromagnetic features at a room temperature, especially in graphite base materials. This paper reveals a mechanism of such ferromagnetic features by modeling nanometer size asymmetric graphene molecule by using both a semi-empirical molecular orbital method and a first principle density function theory. Asymmetrically dihydrogenated zigzag edge graphene molecule shows that high spin state is more stable in total molecular energy than low spin state. Proton ion irradiation play an important role to create such asymmetric features. Also, nitrogen contained graphite ferromagnetism is explained by a similar asymmetric molecule model.
  • Recent experiments indicate room-temperature ferromagnetism in graphite-like materials. This paper offers multiple spin state analysis applied to asymmetric graphene molecule to find out mechanism of ferromagnetic nature. First principle density functional theory is applied to calculate spin density, energy and atom position depending on each spin state. Molecules with dihydrogenated zigzag edges like C64H27, C56H24, C64H25, C56H22 and C64H23 show that in every molecule the highest spin state is the most stable one with over 3000 K energy difference with next spin state. This result suggests a stability of room temperature ferromagnetism in these molecules. In contrast, nitrogen substituted molecules like C59N5H22, C52N4H20, C61N3H22, C54N2H20 and C63N1H22 show opposite result that the lowest spin state is the most stable. Magnetic stability of graphene molecule can be explained by three key issues, that is, edge specified localized spin density, parallel spins exchange interaction inside of a molecule and atom position optimization depending on spin state. Those results will be applied to design a carbon-base ferro-magnet, an ultra high density 100 tera bit /inch2 class information storage and spintronic devices.
  • Recent experiments indicate room-temperature ferromagnetism in graphite like materials. This paper offers an multiple spin state analysis to find out the origine of ferromagnetism in case of nano meter size graphene molecule.First principle density function theory calculation (DFT-GGA with 631-G basis set) is applied to nano meter size asymmetric graphene fifteen molecules. Major results are,(1) Dihydrogenated zigzag edge molecule like C64H27 show that the most stable (lowest molecular energy) spin state is the highest one as Sz=5/2. Examples for spin density map of Sz=1/2,3/2 and 5/2 is shown in Fig.1. In other molecules like C56H24, C64H25, C64H22 and C64H23 also show the highest spin state most stable as shown in Fig.2. Energy difference between most stable spin state and next one overcome temperature difference 1000K,which suggests a stability of room temperature ferromagnetism. (2) Radical carbon zigzag edge molecules are also analysed. As illustrated in Fig.3, in every five molecule, also the highest spin state is most stable. (3) In contrast, nitrogen substituted molecules like C59N5H22, C61N3H22 etc. show opposite result,that is, the lowest spin state is most stable as shown in Fig.4. There are following three key issues to bring those results. (A) Edge specified localized spin arrangement. (B) Up-Up (also Down-Down) complex spin pairs inside of molecule. (C) Optimized atom position rearrangement depend on the spin state. Detailed mechanism will be discussed in the Symposium. Multiple spin state analysis is very useful to design carbon based ferro-magnet and also to design new spintronic devices.
  • Specific forms of the exchange correlation energy functionals in first-principles density functional theory-based calculations, such as the local density approximation (LDA) and generalized-gradient approximations (GGA), give rise to structural lattice parameters with typical errors of -2% and 2%. Due to a strong coupling between structure and polarization, the order parameter of ferroelectric transitions, they result in large errors in estimation of temperature dependent ferroelectric structural transition properties. Here, we employ a recently developed GGA functional of Wu and Cohen [Phys. Rev. B 73, 235116 (2006)] and determine total-energy surfaces for zone-center distortions of BaTiO3, PbTiO3, and SrTiO3, and compare them with the ones obtained with calculations based on standard LDA and GGA. Confirming that the Wu and Cohen functional allows better estimation of structural properties at 0 K, we determine a new set of parameters defining the effective Hamiltonian for ferroelectric transition in BaTiO3. Using the new set of parameters, we perform molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations under effective pressures p=0.0 GPa, p=-2.0 GPa, and p=-0.005T GPa. The simulations under p=-0.005T GPa, which is for simulating thermal expansion, show a clear improvement in the cubic to tetragonal transition temperature and c/a parameter of its ferroelectric tetragonal phase, while the description of transitions at lower temperatures to orthorhombic and rhombohedral phases is marginally improved. Our findings augur well for use of Wu-Cohen functional in studies of ferroelectrics at nano-scale, particularly in the form of epitaxial films where the properties depend crucially on the lattice mismatch.
  • The stability of atomic intercalated boron nitride K4 crystal structures, XBN (X=H, Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Br, Rb or Sr) is evaluated by the geometric optimization and frozen phonon calculations based on the first principles calculations. NaBN, MgBN, GaBN, FBN and ClBN are found to be stable. NaBN, GaBN, FBN and ClBN are metallic, whereas MgBN is semiconducting.
  • The stability of atomic intercalated carbon $K_{4}$ crystals, XC$_{2}$ (X=H, Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Br, Rb or Sr) is evaluated by geometry optimization and frozen phonon analysis based on first principles calculations. Although C $K_{4}$ is unstable, NaC$_{2}$ and MgC$_{2}$ are found to be stable. It is shown that NaC$_{2}$ and MgC$_{2}$ are metallic and semi conducting, respectively.
  • The geometric and electronic structures of NaN, CuN, and AgN metal clusters are systematically studied based on the density functional theory over a wide range of cluster sizes 2=<N=<75. A remarkable similarity is observed between the optimized geometric structures of alkali and noble metal clusters over all of the calculated cluster sizes N. The most stable structures are the same for the three different metal clusters for approximately half the cluster sizes N considered in this study. Even if the most stable structures are different, the same types of structures are obtained when the meta-stable structures are also considered. For all of the three different metal clusters, the cluster shapes change in the order of linear, planar, opened, and closed structures with increasing N. This structural type transition leads to a deviation from the monotonic increase in the volume with N. A remarkable similarity is also observed for the N dependence of the cluster energy E(N) for the most stable geometric structures. The amplitude of this energy difference is larger in the two noble metal clusters than in the alkali metal cluster. This is attributed to the contribution of $d$ electrons to the bonds. The magic number is defined in the framework of total energy calculations for the first time. In the case of NaN, a semi-quantitative comparison between the experimental abundance spectra (Knight et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 52, 2141 (1984)) and the total energy calculations is carried out. The changing aspect of the Kohn-Sham eigenvalues from N=2 to N=75 is presented for the three different metal clusters. The feature of the bulk density of states already appears at N=75 for all of three clusters. With increasing N, the HOMO-LUMO gap clearly exhibits an odd-even alternation and converges to 0.
  • Recent scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STM) experiments display images with star and ellipsoidal like features resulting from unique geometrical arrangements of a few adsorbed hydrogen atoms on graphite. Based on first-principles STM simulations, we propose a new model with three hydrogen atoms adsorbed on the graphene sheet in the shape of an equilateral triangle with a hexagon ring surrounded inside. The model reproduces the experimentally observed starlike STM patterns. Additionally, we confirm that an ortho-hydrogen pair is the configuration corresponding to the ellipsoidal images. These calculations reveal that when the hydrogen pairs are in the same orientation, they are energetically more stable.