• We present the detection of very extended stellar populations around the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) out to R~21 degrees, or ~18.5 kpc at the LMC distance of 50 kpc, as detected in the Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) performed with the Dark Energy Camera on the NOAO Blanco 4m Telescope. The deep (g~24) SMASH color magnitude diagrams (CMDs) clearly reveal old (~9 Gyr), metal-poor ([Fe/H]=-0.8 dex) main-sequence stars at a distance of 50 kpc. The surface brightness of these detections is extremely low with our most distant detection having 34 mag per arcsec squared in g-band. The SMASH radial density profile breaks from the inner LMC exponential decline at ~13-15 degrees and a second component at larger radii has a shallower slope with power-law index of -2.2 that contributes ~0.4% of the LMC's total stellar mass. In addition, the SMASH densities exhibit large scatter around our best-fit model of ~70% indicating that the envelope of stellar material in the LMC periphery is highly disturbed. We also use data from the NOAO Source catalog to map the LMC main-sequence populations at intermediate radii and detect a steep dropoff in density on the eastern side of the LMC (at R~8 deg) as well as an extended structure to the far northeast. These combined results confirm the existence of a very extended, low-density envelope of stellar material with disturbed shape around the LMC. The exact origin of this structure remains unclear but the leading options include a classical accreted halo or tidally stripped outer disk material.
  • We present high-resolution (sub-parsec) observations of a giant molecular cloud in the nearest star-forming galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. ALMA Band 6 observations trace the bulk of the molecular gas in $^{12}$CO(2-1) and high column density regions in $^{13}$CO(2-1). Our target is a quiescent cloud (PGCC G282.98-32.40, which we refer to as the "Planck cold cloud" or PCC) in the southern outskirts of the galaxy where star-formation activity is very low and largely confined to one location. We decompose the cloud into structures using a dendrogram and apply an identical analysis to matched-resolution cubes of the 30 Doradus molecular cloud (located near intense star formation) for comparison. Structures in the PCC exhibit roughly 10 times lower surface density and 5 times lower velocity dispersion than comparably sized structures in 30 Dor, underscoring the non-universality of molecular cloud properties. In both clouds, structures with relatively higher surface density lie closer to simple virial equilibrium, whereas lower surface density structures tend to exhibit super-virial line widths. In the PCC, relatively high line widths are found in the vicinity of an infrared source whose properties are consistent with a luminous young stellar object. More generally, we find that the smallest resolved structures ("leaves") of the dendrogram span close to the full range of line widths observed across all scales. As a result, while the bulk of the kinetic energy is found on the largest scales, the small-scale energetics tend to be dominated by only a few structures, leading to substantial scatter in observed size-linewidth relationships.
  • The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) are unique local laboratories for studying the formation and evolution of small galaxies in exquisite detail. The Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) is an NOAO community DECam survey of the Clouds mapping 480 square degrees (distributed over ~2400 square degrees at ~20% filling factor) to ~24th mag in ugriz with the goal of identifying broadly distributed, low surface brightness stellar populations associated with the stellar halos and tidal debris of the Clouds. SMASH will also derive spatially-resolved star formation histories covering all ages out to large radii from the MCs that will further complement our understanding of their formation. Here, we present a summary of the survey, its data reduction, and a description of the first public Data Release (DR1). The SMASH DECam data have been reduced with a combination of the NOAO Community Pipeline, PHOTRED, an automated PSF photometry pipeline based mainly on the DAOPHOT suite, and custom calibration software. The attained astrometric precision is ~15 mas and the accuracy is ~2 mas with respect to the Gaia DR1 astrometric reference frame. The photometric precision is ~0.5-0.7% in griz and ~1% in u with a calibration accuracy of ~1.3% in all bands. The median 5 sigma point source depths in ugriz bands are 23.9, 24.8, 24.5, 24.2, 23.5 mag. The SMASH data already have been used to discover the Hydra II Milky Way satellite, the SMASH 1 old globular cluster likely associated with the LMC, and very extended stellar populations around the LMC out to R~18.4 kpc. SMASH DR1 contains measurements of ~100 million objects distributed in 61 fields. A prototype version of the NOAO Data Lab provides data access, including a data discovery tool, SMASH database access, an image cutout service, and a Jupyter notebook server with example notebooks for exploratory analysis.
  • The protoplanetary disk around HL Tau is so far the youngest candidate of planet formation, and it is still embedded in a protostellar envelope with a size of thousands of au. In this work, we study the gas kinematics in the envelope and its possible influence on the embedded disk. We present our new ALMA cycle 3 observational results of HL Tau in the 13CO (2-1) and C18O (2-1) emission at resolutions of 0.8" (110 au), and we compare the observed velocity pattern with models of different kinds of gas motions. Both the 13CO and C18O emission lines show a central compact component with a size of 2" (280 au), which traces the protoplanetary disk. The disk is clearly resolved and shows a Keplerian motion, from which the protostellar mass of HL Tau is estimated to be 1.8+/-0.3 M$_\odot$, assuming the inclination angle of the disk to be 47 deg from the plane of the sky. The 13CO emission shows two arc structures with sizes of 1000-2000 au and masses of 3E-3 M$_\odot$ connected to the central disk. One is blueshifted and stretches from the northeast to the northwest, and the other is redshifted and stretches from the southwest to the southeast. We find that simple kinematical models of infalling and (counter-)rotating flattened envelopes cannot fully explain the observed velocity patterns in the arc structures. The gas kinematics of the arc structures can be better explained with three-dimensional infalling or outflowing motions. Nevertheless, the observed velocity in the northwestern part of the blueshifted arc structure is ~60-70% higher than the expected free-fall velocity. We discuss two possible origins of the arc structures: (1) infalling flows externally compressed by an expanding shell driven by XZ Tau and (2) outflowing gas clumps caused by gravitational instabilities in the protoplanetary disk around HL Tau.
  • We perform a comprehensive analysis of the planetary nebula (PN) NGC6781 to investigate the physical conditions of each of its ionized, atomic, and molecular gas and dust components and the object's evolution, based on panchromatic observational data ranging from UV to radio. Empirical nebular elemental abundances, compared with theoretical predictions via nucleosynthesis models of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, indicate that the progenitor is a solar-metallicity, 2.25-3.0 Msun initial-mass star. We derive the best-fit distance of 0.46 kpc by fitting the stellar luminosity (as a function of the distance and effective temperature of the central star) with the adopted post-AGB evolutionary tracks. Our excitation energy diagram analysis indicate high excitation temperatures in the photodissociation region (PDR) beyond the ionized part of the nebula, suggesting extra heating by shock interactions between the slow AGB wind and the fast PN wind. Through iterative fitting using the Cloudy code with empirically-derived constraints, we find the best-fit dusty photoionization model of the object that would inclusively reproduce all of the adopted panchromatic observational data. The estimated total gas mass (0.41 Msun) corresponds to the mass ejected during the last AGB thermal pulse event predicted for a 2.5 Msun initial-mass star. A significant fraction of the total mass (about 70 percent) is found to exist in the PDR, demonstrating the critical importance of the PDR in PNe that are generally recognized as the hallmark of ionized/H+ regions.
  • N103B is a Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR) projected in the outskirt of the superbubble around the rich cluster NGC 1850 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We have obtained H$\alpha$ and continuum images of N103B with the $\textit{Hubble Space Telescope}$ ($\textit{HST}$) and high-dispersion spectra with 4m and 1.5m telescopes at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. The $\textit{HST}$ H$\alpha$ image exhibits a complex system of nebular knots inside an incomplete filamentary elliptical shell that opens to the east where X-ray and radio emission extends further out. Electron densities of the nebular knots, determined from the [S II] doublet, reach 5300 cm$^{-3}$, indicating an origin of circumstellar medium, rather than interstellar medium. The high-dispersion spectra reveal three kinematic components in N103B: (1) a narrow component with [N II]6583/H$\alpha$ $\sim$ 0.14 from the ionized interstellar gas associated with the superbubble of NGC 1850 in the background, (2) a broader H$\alpha$ component with no [N II] counterpart from the SNR's collisionless shocks into a mostly neutral ambient medium, and (3) a broad component, $\Delta V$ $\sim$ 500 km s$^{-1}$, in both H$\alpha$ and [N II] lines from shocked material in the nebular knots. The Balmer-dominated filaments can be fitted by an ellipse, and we adopt its center as the site of SN explosion. We find that the star closest to this explosion center has colors and luminosity consistent with a 1 $M_\odot$ surviving subgiant companion as modelled by Podsiadlowski. Follow-up spectroscopic observations are needed to confirm this star as the SN's surviving companion.
  • The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array(ALMA) Band 1 receiver covers the 35-50 GHz frequency band. Development of prototype receivers, including the key components and subsystems has been completed and two sets of prototype receivers were fully tested. We will provide an overview of the ALMA Band 1 science goals, and its requirements and design for use on the ALMA. The receiver development status will also be discussed and the infrastructure, integration, evaluation of fully-assembled band 1 receiver system will be covered. Finally, a discussion of the technical and management challenges encountered will be presented.
  • Observations suggest that there is a significant fraction of O-stars in the field of the Milky Way that appear to have formed in isolation or in low mass clusters ($<$100 $M_\odot$). The existence of these high-mass stars that apparently formed in the field challenges the generally accepted paradigm, which requires star formation to occur in clustered environments. In order to understand the physical conditions for the formation of these stars, it is necessary to observe isolated high-mass stars while they are still forming. With the $Hubble$ $Space$ $Telescope$, we observe the seven most isolated massive ($>$8 $M_\odot$) young stellar objects (MYSOs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The observations show that while these MYSOs are remote from other MYSOs, OB associations, and even from known giant molecular clouds, they are actually not isolated at all. Imaging reveals $\sim$100 to several hundred pre--main-sequence (PMS) stars in the vicinity of each MYSO. These previously undetected PMS stars form prominent compact clusters around the MYSOs, and in most cases they are also distributed sparsely across the observed regions. Contrary to what previous high-mass field star studies show, these observations suggest that high-mass stars may not be able to form in clusters with masses less than 100 $M_\odot$. If these MYSOs are indeed the best candidates for isolated high-mass star formation, then the lack of isolation is at odds with random sampling of the IMF. Moreover, while isolated MYSOs may not exist, we find evidence that isolated clusters containing O-stars can exist, which in itself is rare.
  • Naoyuki Tamura, Naruhisa Takato, Atsushi Shimono, Yuki Moritani, Kiyoto Yabe, Yuki Ishizuka, Akitoshi Ueda, Yukiko Kamata, Hrand Aghazarian, Stephane Arnouts, Gabriel Barban, Robert H. Barkhouser, Renato C. Borges, David F. Braun, Michael A. Carr, Pierre-Yves Chabaud, Yin-Chang Chang, Hsin-Yo Chen, Masashi Chiba, Richard C. Y. Chou, You-Hua Chu, Judith G. Cohen, Rodrigo P. de Almeida, Antonio C. de Oliveira, Ligia S. de Oliveira, Richard G. Dekany, Kjetil Dohlen, Jesulino B. dos Santos, Leandro H. dos Santos, Richard S. Ellis, Maximilian Fabricius, Didier Ferrand, Decio Ferreira, Mirek Golebiowski, Jenny E. Greene, Johannes Gross, James E. Gunn, Randolph Hammond, Albert Harding, Murdock Hart, Timothy M. Heckman, Christopher M. Hirata, Paul Ho, Stephen C. Hope, Larry Hovland, Shu-Fu Hsu, Yen-Shan Hu, Ping-Jie Huang, Marc Jaquet, Yipeng Jing, Jennifer Karr, Masahiko Kimura, Matthew E. King, Eiichiro Komatsu, Vincent Le Brun, Olivier Le Fevre, Arnaud Le Fur, David Le Mignant, Hung-Hsu Ling, Craig P. Loomis, Robert H. Lupton, Fabrice Madec, Peter Mao, Lucas S. Marrara, Claudia Mendes de Oliveira, Yosuke Minowa, Chaz N. Morantz, Hitoshi Murayama, Graham J. Murray, Youichi Ohyama, Joseph Orndorff, Sandrine Pascal, Jefferson M. Pereira, Daniel J. Reiley, Martin Reinecke, Andreas Ritter, Mitsuko Roberts, Mark A. Schwochert, Michael D. Seiffert, Stephen A. Smee, Laerte Sodre Jr., David N. Spergel, Aaron J. Steinkraus, Michael A. Strauss, Christian Surace, Yasushi Suto, Nao Suzuki, John Swinbank, Philip J. Tait, Masahiro Takada, Tomonori Tamura, Yoko Tanaka, Laurence Tresse, Orlando Verducci Jr., Didier Vibert, Clement Vidal, Shiang-Yu Wang, Chih-Yi Wen, Chi-Hung Yan, Naoki Yasuda
    PFS (Prime Focus Spectrograph), a next generation facility instrument on the 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope, is a very wide-field, massively multiplexed, optical and near-infrared spectrograph. Exploiting the Subaru prime focus, 2394 reconfigurable fibers will be distributed over the 1.3 deg field of view. The spectrograph has been designed with 3 arms of blue, red, and near-infrared cameras to simultaneously observe spectra from 380nm to 1260nm in one exposure at a resolution of ~1.6-2.7A. An international collaboration is developing this instrument under the initiative of Kavli IPMU. The project is now going into the construction phase aiming at undertaking system integration in 2017-2018 and subsequently carrying out engineering operations in 2018-2019. This article gives an overview of the instrument, current project status and future paths forward.
  • Planetary nebulae (PNe) are expected to have a ~10$^{5}$ K interface layer between the $\geq$10$^{6}$ K inner hot bubble and the ~10$^{4}$ K optical nebular shell. The PN structure and evolution, and the X-ray emission depend critically on the efficiency of mixing of material at this interface layer. However, neither its location nor its spatial extent has ever been determined so far. Using high-spatial resolution HST STIS spectroscopic observations of the N V 1239,1243 lines in the Cat's Eye Nebula (NGC 6543), we have detected this interface layer and determined its location, extent, and physical properties for the first time in a PN. We confirm that this interface layer, as revealed by the spatial distribution of the N V 1239 line emission, is located between the hot bubble and the optical nebular shell. We estimate a thickness of 1.5$\times$10$^{16}$ cm and an electron density of ~200 cm$^{-3}$ for the mixing layer. With a thermal pressure of ~2$\times$10$^{-8}$ dyn cm$^{-2}$, the mixing layer is in pressure equilibrium with the hot bubble and ionized nebular rim of NGC 6543.
  • We perform spatial and spectral analyses of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) gamma-ray emission collected over 66 months by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In our spatial analysis, we model the LMC cosmic-ray distribution and gamma-ray production using observed maps of the LMC interstellar medium, star formation history, interstellar radiation field, and synchrotron emission. We use bootstrapping of the data to quantify the robustness of spatial model performance. We model the LMC gamma-ray spectrum using fitting functions derived from the physics of $\pi^0$ decay, bremsstrahlung, and inverse Compton scattering. We find the integrated gamma-ray flux of the LMC from 200 MeV to 20 GeV to be $1.38 \pm 0.02 \times 10^{-7}$ ph cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, of which we attribute about 10% to inverse Compton scattering and 40% to bremsstrahlung. From our work, we conclude that the spectral index of the LMC cosmic-ray proton population is 2.4$\pm$0.2, and we find that cosmic-ray energy loss through gamma-ray production is concentrated within a few hundred pc of acceleration sites. Assuming cosmic-ray energy equipartition with magnetic fields, we estimate LMC cosmic rays encounter an average magnetic field strength ~3 $\mu$G.
  • IRC+10216 is the nearest carbon star with a very high mass-loss rate. The existence of a binary companion has been hinted by indirect observational evidence, such as the bipolar morphology of its nebula and a spiral-like pattern in its circumstellar material; however, to date, no companion has been identified. We have examined archival Hubble Space Telescope images of IRC+10216, and find that the images taken in 2011 exhibit dramatic changes in its innermost region from those taken at earlier epochs. The scattered light is more spread out in 2011. After proper motion correction, the brightest peak in 2011 is close to, but not coincident with, the dominant peak in previous epochs. A fainter point-like object was revealed at about 0.5 arcsec from this brightest peak. We suggest that these changes at the core of IRC+10216 are caused by dissipation of intervening circumstellar dust, as indicated by the brightening trend in the lightcurve extracted from the Catalina photometric survey. We tentatively identify the brightest peak in 2011 as the primary star of IRC+10216 and the fainter point-like source as a companion. The cause of non-detections of the companion candidate in earlier epochs is uncertain. These identifications need to be verified by monitoring of the core of IRC+10216 at high resolution in the future.
  • We present the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Hydra II, found serendipitously within the data from the ongoing Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) conducted with the Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco 4m Telescope. The new satellite is compact (r_h = 68 +/- 11 pc) and faint (M_V = -4.8 +/- 0.3), but well within the realm of dwarf galaxies. The stellar distribution of HydraII in the color-magnitude diagram is well-described by a metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -2.2) and old (13 Gyr) isochrone and shows a distinct blue horizontal branch, some possible red clump stars, and faint stars that are suggestive of blue stragglers. At a heliocentric distance of 134 +/- 10 kpc, Hydra II is located in a region of the Galactic halo that models have suggested may host material from the leading arm of the Magellanic Stream. A comparison with N-body simulations hints that the new dwarf galaxy could be or could have been a satellite of the Magellanic Clouds.
  • We present the detection and analysis of molecular hydrogen emission toward ten interstellar regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We examined low-resolution infrared spectral maps of twelve regions obtained with the Spitzer infrared spectrograph (IRS). The pure rotational 0--0 transitions of H$_2$ at 28.2 and 17.1${\,\rm \mu m}$ are detected in the IRS spectra for ten regions. The higher level transitions are mostly upper limit measurements except for three regions, where a 3$\sigma$ detection threshold is achieved for lines at 12.2 and 8.6${\,\rm \mu m}$. The excitation diagrams of the detected H$_2$ transitions are used to determine the warm H$_2$ gas column density and temperature. The single-temperature fits through the lower transition lines give temperatures in the range $86-137\,{\rm K}$. The bulk of the excited H$_2$ gas is found at these temperatures and contributes $\sim$5-17% to the total gas mass. We find a tight correlation of the H$_2$ surface brightness with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and total infrared emission, which is a clear indication of photo-electric heating in photodissociation regions. We find the excitation of H$_2$ by this process is equally efficient in both atomic and molecular dominated regions. We also present the correlation of the warm H$_2$ physical conditions with dust properties. The warm H$_2$ mass fraction and excitation temperature show positive correlations with the average starlight intensity, again supporting H$_2$ excitation in photodissociation regions.
  • We analyze the expansion of hydrogen-poor knots and filaments in the born-again planetary nebulae A30 and A78 based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images obtained almost 20 yr apart. The proper motion of these features generally increases with distance to the central star, but the fractional expansion decreases, i.e., the expansion is not homologous. As a result, there is not a unique expansion age, which is estimated to be 610-950 yr for A30 and 600-1140 yr for A78. The knots and filaments have experienced complex dynamical processes: the current fast stellar wind is mass loaded by the material ablated from the inner knots; the ablated material is then swept up until it shocks the inner edges of the outer, hydrogen-rich nebula. The angular expansion of the outer filaments shows a clear dependence on position angle, indicating that the interaction of the stellar wind with the innermost knots channels the wind along preferred directions. The apparent angular expansion of the innermost knots seems to be dominated by the rocket effect of evaporating gas and by the propagation of the ionization front inside them. Radiation-hydrodynamical simulations show that a single ejection of material followed by a rapid onset of the stellar wind and ionizing flux can reproduce the variety of clumps and filaments at different distances from the central star found in A30 and A78.
  • A very sensitive X-ray investigation of the giant HII region N11 in the LMC was performed using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The 300ks observation reveals X-ray sources with luminosities down to 10^32 erg/s, increasing by more than a factor of 5 the number of known point sources in the field. Amongst these detections are 13 massive stars (3 compact groups of massive stars, 9 O-stars and one early B-star) with log(Lx/Lbol)~-6.5 to -7, which may suggest that they are highly magnetic or colliding wind systems. On the other hand, the stacked signal for regions corresponding to undetected O-stars yields log(Lx/Lbol)~-7.3, i.e., an emission level comparable to similar Galactic stars despite the lower metallicity. Other point sources coincide with 11 foreground stars, 6 late-B/A stars in N11, and many background objects. This observation also uncovers the extent and detailed spatial properties of the soft, diffuse emission regions but the presence of some hotter plasma in their spectra suggests contamination by the unresolved stellar population.
  • Only a few percent of cool, old white dwarfs (WDs) have infrared excesses interpreted as originating in small hot disks due to the infall and destruction of single asteroids that come within the star's Roche limit. Infrared excesses at 24 micron were also found to derive from the immediate vicinity of younger, hot WDs, most of which are still central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPN). The incidence of CSPN with this excess is 18%. The Helix CSPN, with a 24 micron excess, has been suggested to have a disk formed from collisions of Kuiper belt-like objects (KBOs). In this paper, we have analyzed an additional sample of CSPN to look for similar infrared excesses. These CSPN are all members of the PG 1159 class and were chosen because their immediate progenitors are known to often have dusty environments consistent with large dusty disks. We find that, overall, PG 1159 stars do not present such disks more often than other CSPN, although the statistics (5 objects) are poor. We then consider the entire sample of CSPN with infrared excesses, and compare it to the infrared properties of old WDs, as well as cooler post-AGB stars. We conclude with the suggestion that the infrared properties of CSPN more plausibly derive from AGB-formed disks rather than disks formed via the collision of KBOs, although the latter scenario cannot be ruled out. We finally remark that there seems to be an association between CSPN with a 24 micron excess and confirmed or possible binarity of the central star.
  • Massive stars can alter physical conditions and properties of their ambient interstellar dust grains via radiative heating and shocks. The HII regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) offer ideal sites to study the stellar energy feedback effects on dust because stars can be resolved, and the galaxy's nearly face-on orientation allows us to unambiguously associate HII regions with their ionizing massive stars. The Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the LMC provides multi-wavelength (3.6 to 160 $\mu$m) photometric data of all HII regions. To investigate the evolution of dust properties around massive stars, we have analyzed spatially-resolved IR dust emission from two classical HII regions (N63 and N180) and two simple superbubbles (N70 and N144) in the LMC. We produce photometric spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of numerous small subregions for each region based on its stellar distributions and nebular morphologies. We use DustEM dust emission model fits to characterize the dust properties. Color-color diagrams and model fits are compared with the radiation field (estimated from photometric and spectroscopic surveys). Strong radial variations of SEDs can be seen throughout the regions, reflecting the available radiative heating. Emission from very small grains drastically increases at locations where the radiation field is the highest, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) appear to be destroyed. PAH emission is the strongest in the presence of molecular clouds, provided that the radiation field is low.
  • This paper reports variations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) features that were found in Spitzer Space Telescope spectra of carbon-rich post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The paper consists of two parts. The first part describes our Spitzer spectral observing programme of 24 stars including post-AGB candidates. The latter half of this paper presents the analysis of PAH features in 20 carbon-rich post-AGB stars in the LMC, assembled from the Spitzer archive as well as from our own programme. We found that five post-AGB stars showed a broad feature with a peak at 7.7 micron, that had not been classified before. Further, the 10--13 micron PAH spectra were classified into four classes, one of which has three broad peaks at 11.3, 12.3 and 13.3 micron rather than two distinct sharp peaks at 11.3 and 12.7 micron, as commonly found in HII regions. Our studies suggest that PAHs are gradually processed while the central stars evolve from post-AGB phase to PNe, changing their composition before PAHs are incorporated into the interstellar medium. Although some metallicity dependence of PAH spectra exists, the evolutionary state of an object is more significant than its metallicity in determining the spectral characteristics of PAHs for LMC and Galactic post-AGB stars.
  • The Spitzer Space Telescope has three science instruments (IRAC, MIPS, and IRS) that can take images at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, 70, and 160 microns, spectra over 5--38 microns, and spectral energy distribution over 52--100 microns. The Spitzer archive contains targeted imaging observations for more than 100 PNe. Spitzer legacy surveys, particularly the GLIMPSE survey of the Galactic plane, contain additional serendipitous imaging observations of PNe. Spitzer imaging and spectroscopic observations of PNe allow us to investigate atomic/molecular line emission and dust continuum from the nebulae as well as circumstellar dust disks around the central stars. Highlights of Spitzer observations of PNe are reviewed in this paper.
  • Two types of dust disks around white dwarfs (WDs) have been reported: small dust disks around cool metal-rich WDs consisting of tidally disrupted asteroids, and a large dust disk around the hot central WD of the Helix planetary nebula (PN) possibly produced by collisions among Kuiper Belt-like objects. To search for more dust disks of the latter type, we have conducted a Spitzer MIPS 24 um survey of 71 hot WDs or pre-WDs, among which 35 are central stars of PNe (CSPNs). Nine of these evolved stars are detected and their 24 um flux densities are at least two orders of magnitude higher than their expected photospheric emission. Considering the bias against detection of distant objects, the 24 um detection rate for the sample is >~15%. It is striking that seven, or ~20%, of the WD and pre-WDs in known PNe exhibit 24 um excesses, while two, or 5-6%, of the WDs not in PNe show 24 um excesses and they have the lowest 24 um flux densities. We have obtained follow-up Spitzer IRS spectra for five objects. Four show clear continuum emission at 24 um, and one is overwhelmed by a bright neighboring star but still show a hint of continuum emission. In the cases of WD 0950+139 and CSPN K1-22, a late-type companion is present, making it difficult to determine whether the excess 24 um emission is associated with the WD or its red companion. High-resolution images in the mid-IR are needed to establish unambiguously the stars responsible for the 24 um excesses.
  • We present our investigation of pre--main-sequence (PMS) stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) from imaging with Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 camera. Our targets of interest are four star-forming regions located at the periphery of the super-giant shell LMC 4 (Shapley Constellation III). The PMS stellar content of the regions is revealed through the differential Hess diagrams and the observed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). Further statistical analysis of stellar distributions along cross-sections of the faint part of the CMDs allowed the quantitative assessment of the PMS stars census, and the isolation of faint PMS stars as the true low-mass stellar members of the regions. These distributions are found to be well represented by a double Gaussian function, the first component of which represents the main-sequence field stars and the second the native PMS stars of each region. Based on this result, a cluster membership probability was assigned to each PMS star according to its CMD position. The higher extinction in the region LH 88 did not allow the unambiguous identification of its native stellar population. The CMD distributions of the PMS stars with the highest membership probability in the regions LH 60, LH 63 and LH 72 exhibit an extraordinary similarity among the regions, suggesting that these stars share common characteristics, as well as common recent star formation history. Considering that the regions are located at different areas of the edge of LMC 4, this finding suggests that star formation along the super-giant shell may have occurred almost simultaneously.
  • The Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP) has shown that the Carina Nebula displays bright, spatially-complex soft diffuse X-ray emission. Here we `sum up' the CCCP diffuse emission work by comparing the global morphology and spectrum of Carina's diffuse X-ray emission to other famous sites of massive star formation with pronounced diffuse X-ray emission: M17, NGC 3576, NGC 3603, and 30 Doradus. All spectral models require at least two diffuse thermal plasma components to achieve adequate spectral fits, a softer component with kT = 0.2--0.6 keV and a harder component with kT = 0.5--0.9 keV. In several cases these hot plasmas appear to be in a state of non-equilibrium ionization that may indicate recent and current strong shocks. A cavity north of the embedded giant HII region NGC 3576 is the only region studied here that exhibits hard diffuse X-ray emission; this emission appears to be nonthermal and is likely due to a recent cavity supernova, as evidenced by a previously-known pulsar and newly-discovered pulsar wind nebula also seen in this cavity. All of these targets exhibit X-ray emission lines that are not well-modeled by variable-abundance thermal plasmas and that might be attributed to charge exchange at the shock between the hot, tenuous, X-ray-emitting plasma and cold, dense molecular material; this is likely evidence for dust destruction at the many hot/cold interfaces that characterize massive star-forming regions.
  • We present a 1.42 square degree mosaic of diffuse X-ray emission in the Great Nebula in Carina from the Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer camera. After removing >14,000 X-ray point sources from the field, we smooth the remaining unresolved emission, tessellate it into segments of similar apparent surface brightness, and perform X-ray spectral fitting on those tessellates to infer the intrinsic properties of the X-ray-emitting plasma. By modeling faint resolved point sources, we estimate the contribution to the extended X-ray emission from unresolved point sources and show that the vast majority of Carina's unresolved X-ray emission is truly diffuse. Line-like correlated residuals in the X-ray spectral fits suggest that substantial X-ray emission is generated by charge exchange at the interfaces between Carina's hot, rarefied plasma and its many cold neutral pillars, ridges, and clumps.
  • The Great Nebula in Carina provides an exceptional view into the violent massive star formation and feedback that typifies giant HII regions and starburst galaxies. We have mapped the Carina star-forming complex in X-rays, using archival Chandra data and a mosaic of 20 new 60ks pointings using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, as a testbed for understanding recent and ongoing star formation and to probe Carina's regions of bright diffuse X-ray emission. This study has yielded a catalog of properties of >14,000 X-ray point sources; >9800 of them have multiwavelength counterparts. Using Chandra's unsurpassed X-ray spatial resolution, we have separated these point sources from the extensive, spatially-complex diffuse emission that pervades the region; X-ray properties of this diffuse emission suggest that it traces feedback from Carina's massive stars. In this introductory paper, we motivate the survey design, describe the Chandra observations, and present some simple results, providing a foundation for the 15 papers that follow in this Special Issue and that present detailed catalogs, methods, and science results.