• The Bell inequality, and its substantial experimental violation, offers a seminal paradigm for showing that the world is not in fact locally realistic. Here, going beyond the concept of Bell's inequality, we show that quantum teleportation can be used to quantitatively characterize quantum correlations using a generic physical model of genuinely classical processes. The validity of the proposed formalism is demonstrated by considering the problem of teleportation through a linear three-node quantum network. A hierarchy is derived between the Bell nonlocality, nonbilocality, steering and nonlocality-steering hybrid correlations based on a process fidelity constraint. The proposed formalism can be directly extended to reveal the nonlocality structure behind teleportation through any linear many-node quantum network. The formalism provides a faithful identification of quantum teleportation and demonstrates for the first time the use of quantum-information processing as a means of quantitatively discriminating quantum correlations.
  • Decision of whether a Boolean equation system has a solution is an NPC problem and finding a solution is NP hard. In this paper, we present a quantum algorithm to decide whether a Boolean equation system FS has a solution and compute one if FS does have solutions with any given success probability. The runtime complexity of the algorithm is polynomial in the size of FS and the condition number of FS. As a consequence, we give a polynomial-time quantum algorithm for solving Boolean equation systems if their condition numbers are small, say polynomial in the size of FS. We apply our quantum algorithm for solving Boolean equations to the cryptanalysis of several important cryptosystems: the stream cipher Trivum, the block cipher AES, the hash function SHA-3/Keccak, and the multivariate public key cryptosystems, and show that they are secure under quantum algebraic attack only if the condition numbers of the corresponding equation systems are large. This leads to a new criterion for designing cryptosystems that can against the attack of quantum computers: their corresponding equation systems must have large condition numbers.
  • In this paper, we give quantum algorithms for two fundamental computation problems: solving polynomial systems and optimization over finite fields. The quantum algorithms can solve these problems with any given probability and have complexities polynomial in the size of the input and the condition number of certain polynomial system related to the problem. So, we achieved exponential speedup for these problems when their condition numbers are small. As special cases of the optimization problem, quantum algorithms are given for the polynomial systems with noise, the short integer solution problem, cryptanalysis for the lattice based NTRU cryptosystems. The main technical contribution of the paper is how to reduce polynomial system solving and optimization over finite fields into the determination of Boolean solutions of a polynomial system over C, under the condition that the number of variables and the total sparseness of the new system is well controlled.
  • We perform decoy-state quantum key distribution between a low-Earth-orbit satellite and multiple ground stations located in Xinglong, Nanshan, and Graz, which establish satellite-to-ground secure keys with ~kHz rate per passage of the satellite Micius over a ground station. The satellite thus establishes a secure key between itself and, say, Xinglong, and another key between itself and, say, Graz. Then, upon request from the ground command, Micius acts as a trusted relay. It performs bitwise exclusive OR operations between the two keys and relays the result to one of the ground stations. That way, a secret key is created between China and Europe at locations separated by 7600 km on Earth. These keys are then used for intercontinental quantum-secured communication. This was on the one hand the transmission of images in a one-time pad configuration from China to Austria as well as from Austria to China. Also, a videoconference was performed between the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Chinese Academy of Sciences, which also included a 280 km optical ground connection between Xinglong and Beijing. Our work points towards an efficient solution for an ultralong-distance global quantum network, laying the groundwork for a future quantum internet.
  • Quantum entanglement was termed "spooky action at a distance" in the well-known paper by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen. Entanglement is expected to be distributed over longer and longer distances in both practical applications and fundamental research into the principles of nature. Here, we present a proposal for distributing entangled photon pairs between the Earth and Moon using a Lagrangian point at a distance of 1.28 light seconds. One of the most fascinating features in this long-distance distribution of entanglement is that we can perform Bell test with human supply the random measurement settings and record the results while still maintaining space-like intervals. To realize a proof-of-principle experiment, we develop an entangled photon source with 1 GHz generation rate, about 2 orders of magnitude higher than previous results. Violation of the Bell's inequality was observed under a total simulated loss of 103 dB with measurement settings chosen by two experimenters. This demonstrates the feasibility of such long-distance Bell test over extremely high-loss channels, paving the way for the ultimate test of the foundations of quantum mechanics.
  • Quantum mechanics provides means of generating genuine randomness that is impossible with deterministic classical processes. Remarkably, the unpredictability of randomness can be certified in a self-testing manner that is independent of implementation devices. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of self-testing quantum random number generation based on an detection-loophole free Bell test with entangled photons. In the randomness analysis, without the assumption of independent identical distribution, we consider the worst case scenario that the adversary launches the most powerful attacks against quantum adversary. After considering statistical fluctuations and applying an 80 Gb $\times$ 45.6 Mb Toeplitz matrix hashing, we achieve a final random bit rate of 114 bits/s, with a failure probability less than $10^{-5}$. Such self-testing random number generators mark a critical step towards realistic applications in cryptography and fundamental physics tests.
  • Silicon single-photon detectors (SPDs) are the key devices for detecting single photons in the visible wavelength range. Here we present high detection efficiency silicon SPDs dedicated to the generation of multiphoton entanglement based on the technique of high-frequency sine wave gating. The silicon single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) components are acquired by disassembling 6 commercial single-photon counting modules (SPCMs). Using the new quenching electronics, the average detection efficiency of SPDs is increased from 68.6% to 73.1% at a wavelength of 785 nm. These sine wave gating SPDs are then applied in a four-photon entanglement experiment, and the four-fold coincidence count rate is increased by 30% without degrading its visibility compared with the original SPCMs.
  • Long-distance entanglement distribution is essential both for foundational tests of quantum physics and scalable quantum networks. Owing to channel loss, however, the previously achieved distance was limited to ~100 km. Here, we demonstrate satellite-based distribution of entangled photon pairs to two locations separated by 1203 km on the Earth, through satellite-to-ground two-downlink with a sum of length varies from 1600 km to 2400 km. We observe a survival of two-photon entanglement and a violation of Bell inequality by 2.37+/-0.09 under strict Einstein locality conditions. The obtained effective link efficiency at 1200 km in this work is over 12 orders of magnitude higher than the direct bidirectional transmission of the two photons through the best commercial telecommunication fibers with a loss of 0.16 dB/km.
  • An arbitrary unknown quantum state cannot be precisely measured or perfectly replicated. However, quantum teleportation allows faithful transfer of unknown quantum states from one object to another over long distance, without physical travelling of the object itself. Long-distance teleportation has been recognized as a fundamental element in protocols such as large-scale quantum networks and distributed quantum computation. However, the previous teleportation experiments between distant locations were limited to a distance on the order of 100 kilometers, due to photon loss in optical fibres or terrestrial free-space channels. An outstanding open challenge for a global-scale "quantum internet" is to significantly extend the range for teleportation. A promising solution to this problem is exploiting satellite platform and space-based link, which can conveniently connect two remote points on the Earth with greatly reduced channel loss because most of the photons' propagation path is in empty space. Here, we report the first quantum teleportation of independent single-photon qubits from a ground observatory to a low Earth orbit satellite - through an up-link channel - with a distance up to 1400 km. To optimize the link efficiency and overcome the atmospheric turbulence in the up-link, a series of techniques are developed, including a compact ultra-bright source of multi-photon entanglement, narrow beam divergence, high-bandwidth and high-accuracy acquiring, pointing, and tracking (APT). We demonstrate successful quantum teleportation for six input states in mutually unbiased bases with an average fidelity of 0.80+/-0.01, well above the classical limit. This work establishes the first ground-to-satellite up-link for faithful and ultra-long-distance quantum teleportation, an essential step toward global-scale quantum internet.
  • Quantum key distribution (QKD) uses individual light quanta in quantum superposition states to guarantee unconditional communication security between distant parties. In practice, the achievable distance for QKD has been limited to a few hundred kilometers, due to the channel loss of fibers or terrestrial free space that exponentially reduced the photon rate. Satellite-based QKD promises to establish a global-scale quantum network by exploiting the negligible photon loss and decoherence in the empty out space. Here, we develop and launch a low-Earth-orbit satellite to implement decoy-state QKD with over kHz key rate from the satellite to ground over a distance up to 1200 km, which is up to 20 orders of magnitudes more efficient than that expected using an optical fiber (with 0.2 dB/km loss) of the same length. The establishment of a reliable and efficient space-to-ground link for faithful quantum state transmission constitutes a key milestone for global-scale quantum networks.
  • Intuition from our everyday lives gives rise to the belief that information exchanged between remote parties is carried by physical particles. Surprisingly, in a recent theoretical study [Salih H, Li ZH, Al-Amri M, Zubairy MS (2013) Phys Rev Lett 110:170502], quantum mechanics was found to allow for communication, even without the actual transmission of physical particles. From the viewpoint of communication, this mystery stems from a (nonintuitive) fundamental concept in quantum mechanics wave-particle duality. All particles can be described fully by wave functions. To determine whether light appears in a channel, one refers to the amplitude of its wave function. However, in counterfactual communication, information is carried by the phase part of the wave function. Using a single-photon source, we experimentally demonstrate the counterfactual communication and successfully transfer a monochrome bitmap from one location to another by using a nested version of the quantum Zeno effect.
  • Recent experimental realizations of superfluid mixtures of Bose and Fermi quantum gases provide a unique platform for exploring diverse superfluid phenomena. We study dipole oscillations of a double superfluid in a cigar-shaped optical dipole trap, consisting of $^{41}$K and $^{6}$Li atoms with a large mass imbalance, where the oscillations of the bosonic and fermionic components are coupled via the Bose-Fermi interaction. In our high-precision measurements, the frequencies of both components are observed to be shifted from the single-species ones, and exhibit unusual features. The frequency shifts of the $^{41}$K component are upward (downward) in the radial (axial) direction, whereas the $^{6}$Li component has down-shifted frequencies in both directions. Most strikingly, as the interaction strength is varied, the frequency shifts display a resonant-like behavior in both directions, for both species, and around a similar location at the BCS side of fermionic superfluid. These rich phenomena challenge theoretical understanding of superfluids.
  • Quantum simulation is of great importance in quantum information science. Here, we report an experimental quantum channel simulator imbued with an algorithm for imitating the behavior of a general class of quantum systems. The reported quantum channel simulator consists of four single-qubit gates and one controlled-NOT gate. All types of quantum channels can be decomposed by the algorithm and implemented on this device. We deploy our system to simulate various quantum channels, such as quantum-noise channels and weak quantum measurement. Our results advance experimental quantum channel simulation, which is integral to the goal of quantum information processing.
  • We report a new apparatus for the study of two-species quantum degenerate mixture of $^{41}$K and $^6$Li atoms. We develop and combine several advanced cooling techniques to achieve both large atom number and high phase space density of the two-species atom clouds. Furthermore, we build a high-efficiency two-species magnetic transport system to transfer atom clouds from the 3D magneto-optical-trap chamber to a full glass science chamber of extreme high vacuum environment and good optical access. We perform a forced radio-frequency evaporative cooling for $^{41}$K atoms while the $^6$Li atoms are sympathetically cooled in an optically-plugged magnetic trap. Finally, we achieve the simultaneous quantum degeneracy for the $^{41}$K and $^6$Li atoms. The Bose-Einstein condensate of $^{41}$K has 1.4$\times$10$^5$ atoms with a condensate fraction of about 62%, while the degenerate Fermi gas of $^6$Li has a total atom number of 5.4$\times$10$^5$ at 0.25 Fermi temperature.
  • We prepare a Fermionic superfluid of about $5 \times 10^6$ $^6$Li atoms in a cigar-shaped optical dipole trap and demonstrate that in the weak residual magnetic field curvature, the atom cloud undergoes an oscillatory quadrupole-like expansion over 30~ms. By analyzing the expansion dynamics according to the superfluid hydrodynamic equation, we derive several parameters characterizing quantum state of the trapped Fermionic superfluid, including the Bertsch parameter $\xi$ at unitarity and the effective polytropic index $\overline{\gamma}$ over the whole BEC-BCS crossover. The experimental estimate $\xi=0.42(2)$ agrees well with the quantum Monte Carlo calculation $0.42(1)$. The $\overline{\gamma}$ values show a nonmonotonic behavior as a function of interaction strength, and reduce to the well-known theoretical results in the BEC, BCS and unitary limits.
  • We report on the experimental realization of a ten-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state using thin BiB$_{3}$O$_{6}$ crystals. The observed fidelity is $0.606\pm0.029$, demonstrating a genuine entanglement with a standard deviation of 3.6 $\sigma$. This result is further verified using $p$-value calculation, obtaining an upper bound of $3.7\times10^{-3}$ under an assumed hypothesis test. Our experiment paves a new way to efficiently engineer BiB$_{3}$O$_{6}$ crystal-based multi-photon entanglement systems, which provides a promising platform for investigating advanced optical quantum information processing tasks such as boson sampling, quantum error correction and quantum-enhanced measurement.
  • In this paper, we give decision criteria for normal binomial difference polynomial ideals in the univariate difference polynomial ring F{y} to have finite difference Groebner bases and an algorithm to compute the finite difference Groebner bases if these criteria are satisfied. The novelty of these criteria lies in the fact that complicated properties about difference polynomial ideals are reduced to elementary properties of univariate polynomials in Z[x].
  • Quantum entanglement among multiple spatially separated particles is of fundamental interest, and can serve as central resources for studies in quantum nonlocality, quantum-to-classical transition, quantum error correction, and quantum simulation. The ability of generating an increasing number of entangled particles is an important benchmark for quantum information processing. The largest entangled states were previously created with fourteen trapped ions, eight photons, and five superconducting qubits. Here, based on spontaneous parametric down-converted two-photon entanglement source with simultaneously a high brightness of ~12 MHz/W, a collection efficiency of ~70% and an indistinguishability of ~91% between independent photons, we demonstrate, for the first time, genuine and distillable entanglement of ten single photons under different pump power. Our work creates a state-of-the-art platform for multi-photon experiments, and provide enabling technologies for challenging optical quantum information tasks such as high-efficiency scattershot boson sampling with many photons.
  • We report on a narrow-linewidth cooling of $^{6}$Li atoms using the $2S_{1/2}\to 3P_{3/2}$ transition in the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength regime. By combining the traditional red magneto-optical trap (MOT) at 671 nm and the UV MOT at 323 nm, we obtain a cold sample of $1.3\times10^9$ atoms with a temperature of 58 $\mu$K. Furthermore, we demonstrate a high efficiency magnetic transport for $^{6}$Li atoms with the help of the UV MOT. Finally, we obtain $8.1\times10^8$ atoms with a temperature of 296 $\mu$K at a magnetic gradient of 198 G/cm in the science chamber with a good vacuum environment and large optical access.
  • We use D1 gray molasses to achieve Bose-Einstein condensation of a large number of $^{41}$K atoms in an optical dipole trap. By combining a new configuration of compressed-MOT with D1 gray molasses, we obtain a cold sample of $2.4\times10^9$ atoms with a temperature as low as 42 $\mu$K. After magnetically transferring the atoms into the final glass cell, we perform a two-stage evaporative cooling. A condensate with up to $1.2\times10^6$ atoms in the lowest Zeeman state $|F=1,m_F=1\rangle$ is achieved in the optical dipole trap. Furthermore, we observe two narrow Feshbach resonances in the lowest hyperfine channel, which are in good agreement with theoretical predictions.
  • The superfluid mixture of interacting Bose and Fermi species is a remarkable many-body quantum system. Dilute degenerate atomic gases, especially for two species of distinct masses, are excellent candidates for exploring fundamental features of superfluid mixture. However, producing a mass-imbalance Bose-Fermi superfluid mixture, providing an unambiguous visual proof of two-species superfluidity and probing inter-species interaction effects remain challenging. Here, we report the realization of a two-species superfluid of lithium-6 and potassium-41. By rotating the dilute gases, we observe the simultaneous existence of vortex lattices in both species, and thus present a definitive visual evidence for the simultaneous superfluidity of the two species. Pronounced effects of the inter-species interaction are demonstrated through a series of precision measurements on the formation and decay of two-species vortices. Our system provides a new platform for studying novel macroscopic quantum phenomena in vortex matter of interacting species.
  • Secret sharing of a quantum state, or quantum secret sharing, in which a dealer wants to share certain amount of quantum information with a few players, has wide applications in quantum information. The critical criterion in a threshold secret sharing scheme is confidentiality, with less than the designated number of players, no information can be recovered. Furthermore, in a quantum scenario, one additional critical criterion exists, the capability of sharing entangled and unknown quantum information. Here by employing a six-photon entangled state, we demonstrate a quantum threshold scheme, where the shared quantum secrecy can be efficiently reconstructed with a state fidelity as high as 93%. By observing that any one or two parties cannot recover the secrecy, we show that our scheme meets the confidentiality criterion. Meanwhile, we also demonstrate that entangled quantum information can be shared and recovered via our setting, which demonstrates that our implemented scheme is fully quantum. Moreover, our experimental setup can be treated as a decoding circuit of the 5-qubit quantum error-correcting code with two erasure errors.
  • Ring exchange is an elementary interaction for modeling unconventional topological matters which hold promise for efficient quantum information processing. We report the observation of four-body ring-exchange interactions and the topological properties of anyonic excitations within an ultracold atom system. A minimum toric code Hamiltonian in which the ring exchange is the dominant term, was implemented by engineering a Hubbard Hamiltonian that describes atomic spins in disconnected plaquette arrays formed by two orthogonal superlattices. The ring-exchange interactions were resolved from the dynamical evolutions in the spin orders, matching well with the predicted energy gaps between two anyonic excitations of the spin system. A braiding operation was applied to the spins in the plaquettes and an induced phase $1.00(3)\pi$ in the four-spin state was observed, confirming $\frac{1}{2}$-anynoic statistics. This work represents an essential step towards studying topological matters with many-body systems and the applications in quantum computation and simulation.
  • Ultracold atoms in optical lattices offer a great promise to generate entangled states for scalable quantum information processing owing to the inherited long coherence time and controllability over a large number of particles. We report on the generation, manipulation and detection of atomic spin entanglement in an optical superlattice. Employing a spin-dependent superlattice, atomic spins in the left or right sites can be individually addressed and coherently manipulated by microwave pulses with near unitary fidelities. Spin entanglement of the two atoms in the double wells of the superlattice is generated via dynamical evolution governed by spin superexchange. By observing collisional atom loss with in-situ absorption imaging we measure spin correlations of atoms inside the double wells and obtain the lower boundary of entanglement fidelity as $0.79\pm0.06$, and the violation of a Bell's inequality with $S=2.21\pm 0.08$. The above results represent an essential step towards scalable quantum computation with ultracold atoms in optical lattices.
  • Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering demonstrates that two parties share entanglement even if the measurement devices of one party are untrusted. Here, going beyond this bipartite concept, we develop a novel formalism to explore a large class of EPR steering from generic multipartite quantum systems of arbitrarily high dimensionality and degrees of freedom, such as graph states and hyperentangled systems. All of these quantum characteristics of genuine high-order EPR steering can be efficiently certified with few measurement settings in experiments. We faithfully demonstrate for the first time such generality by experimentally showing genuine four-partite EPR steering and applications to universal one-way quantum computing. Our formalism provides a new insight into the intermediate type of genuine multipartite Bell non-locality and potential applications to quantum of untrusted measurement devices.