• In the coming LSST era, we will observe $\mathcal{O}(100)$ of lensed supernovae (SNe). In this paper, we investigate possibility for predicting time and sky position of a supernova using strong lensing. We find that it will be possible to predict the time and position of the fourth image of SNe which produce four images by strong lensing, with combined information from the three previous images. It is useful to perform multi-messenger observations of the very early phase of supernova explosions including the shock breakout.
  • We investigate the explosive nucleosynthesis during two dimensional neutrino-driven explosion of ultra-stripped Type Ic supernovae evolved from 1.45 and 1.5 M$_\odot$ CO stars. These supernovae explode with the explosion energy of $\sim 10^{50}$ erg and release $\sim 0.1$ M$_\odot$ ejecta. The light trans-iron elements Ga-Zr are produced in the neutrino-irradiated ejecta. The abundance distribution of these elements has a large uncertainty because of the uncertainty of the electron fraction of the neutrino-irradiated ejecta. The yield of the elements will be less than 0.01 M$_\odot$. Ultra-stripped supernova and core-collapse supernova evolved from a light CO core can be main sources of the light trans-iron elements. They could also produce neutron-rich nuclei $^{48}$Ca. The ultra-stripped supernovae eject $^{56}$Ni of $\sim$ 0.006 - 0.01 M$_\odot$. If most of neutrino-irradiated ejecta is proton-rich, $^{56}$Ni will be produced more abundantly. The light curves of these supernovae indicate sub-luminous fast decaying explosion with the peak magnitude of about $-15$ - $-16$. Future observations of ultra-stripped supernovae could give a constraint to the event rate of a class of neutron star mergers.
  • Studies were made of the 1-70 keV persistent spectra of fifteen magnetars as a complete sample observed with Suzaku from 2006 to 2013. Combined with early NuSTAR observations of four hard X-ray emitters, nine objects showed a hard power-law emission dominating at $\gtrsim$10 keV with the 15--60 keV flux of $\sim$1-$11\times 10^{-11}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$. The hard X-ray luminosity $L_{\rm h}$, relative to that of a soft-thermal surface radiation $L_{\rm s}$, tends to become higher toward younger and strongly magnetized objects. Updated from the previous study, their hardness ratio, defined as $\xi=L_{\rm h}/L_{\rm s}$, is correlated with the measured spin-down rate $\dot{P}$ as $\xi=0.62 \times (\dot{P}/10^{-11}\,{\rm s}\,{\rm s}^{-1})^{0.72}$, corresponding with positive and negative correlations of the dipole field strength $B_{\rm d}$ ($\xi \propto B_{\rm d}^{1.41}$) and the characteristic age $\tau_{\rm c}$ ($\xi \propto \tau_{\rm c}^{-0.68}$), respectively. Among our sample, five transients were observed during X-ray outbursts, and the results are compared with their long-term 1-10 keV flux decays monitored with Swift/XRT and RXTE/PCA. Fading curves of three bright outbursts are approximated by an empirical formula used in the seismology, showing a $\sim$10-40 d plateau phase. Transients show the maximum luminosities of $L_{\rm s}$$\sim$$10^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$, which is comparable to those of the persistently bright ones, and fade back to $\lesssim$$10^{32}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Spectral properties are discussed in a framework of the magnetar hypothesis.
  • $^{56}$Ni is an important indicator of the supernova explosions, which characterizes light curves. Nevertheless, rather than $^{56}$Ni, the explosion energy has often been paid attention from the explosion mechanism community, since it is easier to estimate from numerical data than the amount of $^{56}$Ni. The final explosion energy, however, is difficult to estimate by detailed numerical simulations because current simulations cannot reach typical timescale of saturation of explosion energy. Instead, the amount of $^{56}$Ni converges within a short timescale so that it would be a better probe of the explosion mechanism. We investigated the amount of $^{56}$Ni synthesized by explosive nucleosynthesis in supernova ejecta by means of numerical simulations and an analytic model. For numerical simulations, we employ Lagrangian hydrodynamics code in which neutrino heating and cooling terms are taken into account by light-bulb approximation. Initial conditions are taken from Woosley & Hegel (2007), which have 12, 15, 20, and 25 $M_\odot$ in zero age main sequence. We additionally develop an analytic model, which gives a reasonable estimate of the amount of $^{56}$Ni. We found that, in order to produce enough amount of $^{56}$Ni, $\mathcal{O}(1)$ Bethe s$^{-1}$ of growth rate of the explosion energy is needed, which is much larger than that found in recent exploding simulations, typically $\mathcal{O}(0.1)$ Bethe s$^{-1}$.
  • We report results from a series of three-dimensional (3D) rotational core-collapse simulations for $11.2$ and 27 $M_{/odot}$ stars employing neutrino transport scheme by the isotropic diffusion source approximation. By changing the initial strength of rotation systematically, we find a rotation-assisted explosion for the 27$M_{/odot}$ progenitor, which fails in the absence of rotation. The unique feature was not captured in previous two-dimensional (2D) self-consistent rotating models because the growing non-axisymmetric instabilities play a key role. In the rapidly rotating case, strong spiral flows generated by the so-called low $T/|W|$ instability enhance the energy transport from the proto-neutron star (PNS) to the gain region, which makes the shock expansion more energetic. The explosion occurs more strongly in the direction perpendicular to the rotational axis, which is different from previous 2D predictions.
  • We investigate a method to construct parametrized progenitor models for core-collapse supernova simulations. Different from all modern core-collapse supernova studies, which rely on progenitor models from stellar evolution calculations, we follow the methodology of Baron & Cooperstein (1990) to construct initial models. Choosing parametrized spatial distributions of entropy and electron fraction as a function of mass coordinate and solving the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium, we obtain the initial density structures of our progenitor models. First, we calculate structures with parameters fitting broadly the evolutionary model s11.2 of Woosley et al. (2002). We then demonstrate the reliability of our method by performing general relativistic hydrodynamic simulations in spherical symmetry with the isotropic diffusion source approximation to solve the neutrino transport. Our comprehensive parameter study shows that initial models with a small central entropy ($\lesssim 0.4\,k_B$ nucleon$^{-1}$) can explode even in spherically symmetric simulations. Models with a large entropy ($\gtrsim 6\,k_B$ nucleon$^{-1}$) in the Si/O layer have a rather large explosion energy ($\sim 4\times 10^{50}$ erg) at the end of the simulations, which is still rapidly increasing.
  • By performing neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations in spherical symmetry (1D) and axial symmetry (2D) with different progenitor models by Woosley & Heger (2007) from 12 $M_{\odot}$ to 100 $M_{\odot}$, we find that all 1D runs fail to produce an explosion and several 2D runs succeed. The difference in the shock evolutions for different progenitors can be interpreted by the difference in their mass accretion histories, which are in turn determined by the density structures of progenitors. The mass accretion history has two phases in the majority of the models: the earlier phase in which the mass accretion rate is high and rapidly decreasing and the later phase with a low and almost constant accretion rate. They are separated by the so-called turning point, the origin of which is a change of the accreting layer. We argue that shock revival will most likely occur around the turning point and hence that its location in the $\dot M$-$L_\nu$ plane will be a good measure for the possibility of shock revival: if the turning point lies above the critical curve and the system stays there for a long time, shock revival will obtain. In addition, we develop a phenomenological model to approximately evaluate the trajectories in the $\dot M$-$L_\nu$ plane, which, after calibrating free parameters by a small number of 1D simulations, reproduces the location of the turning point reasonably well by using the initial density structure of progenitor alone. We suggest the application of the phenomenological model to a large collection of progenitors in order to infer without simulations which ones are more likely to explode.
  • We study explosion characteristics of ultra-stripped supernovae (SNe), which are candidates of SNe generating binary neutron stars (NSs). As a first step, we perform stellar evolutionary simulations of bare carbon-oxygen cores of mass from 1.45 to 2.0 $M_\odot$ until the iron cores become unstable and start collapsing. We then perform axisymmetric hydrodynamics simulations with spectral neutrino transport using these stellar evolution outcomes as initial conditions. All models exhibit successful explosions driven by neutrino heating. The diagnostic explosion energy, ejecta mass, Ni mass, and NS mass are typically $\sim 10^{50}$ erg, $\sim 0.1 M_\odot$, $\sim 0.01M_\odot$, and $\approx 1.3 M_\odot$, which are compatible with observations of rapidly-evolving and luminous transient such as SN 2005ek. We also find that the ultra-stripped SN is a candidate for producing the secondary low-mass NS in the observed compact binary NSs like PSR J0737-3039.
  • The next time a core-collapse supernova (SN) explodes in our galaxy, vari- ous detectors will be ready and waiting to detect its emissions of gravitational waves (GWs) and neutrinos. Current numerical simulations have successfully introduced multi-dimensional effects to produce exploding SN models, but thus far the explosion mechanism is not well understood. In this paper, we focus on an investigation of progenitor core rotation via comparison of the start time of GW emission and that of the neutronization burst. The GW and neutrino de- tectors are assumed to be, respectively, the KAGRA detector and a co-located gadolinium-loaded water Cherenkov detector, either EGADS or GADZOOKS!. Our detection simulation studies show that for a nearby supernova (0.2 kpc) we can confirm the lack of core rotation close to 100% of the time, and the presence of core rotation about 90% of the time. Using this approach there is also po- tential to confirm rotation for considerably more distant Milky Way supernova explosions.
  • We examine the bright radio synchrotron counterparts of low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts (llGRBs) and relativistic supernovae (SNe) and find that they can be powered by spherical hypernova (HN) explosions. Our results imply that radio-bright HNe are driven by relativistic jets that are choked deep inside the progenitor stars or quasi-spherical magnetized winds from fast-rotating magnetars. We also consider the optical synchrotron counterparts of radio-bright HNe and show that they can be observed as precursors several days before the SN peak with an r-band absolute magnitude of M_r ~ -14 mag. While previous studies suggested that additional trans-relativistic components are required to power the bright radio emission, we find that they overestimated the energy budget of the trans-relativistic component by overlooking some factors related to the minimum energy of non-thermal electrons. If an additional trans-relativistic component exists, then a much brighter optical precursor with M_r ~ -20 mag can be expected. Thus, the scenarios of radio-bright HNe can be distinguished by using optical precursors, which can be detectable from < 100 Mpc by current SN surveys like the Kiso SN Survey, Palomar Transient Factory, and Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System.
  • A rapidly rotating neutron star with strong magnetic fields, called magnetar, is a possible candidate for the central engine of long gamma-ray bursts and hypernovae (HNe). We solve the evolution of a shock wave driven by the wind from magnetar and evaluate the temperature evolution, by which we estimate the amount of $^{56}$Ni that produces a bright emission of HNe. We obtain a constraint on the magnetar parameters, namely the poloidal magnetic field strength ($B_p$) and initial angular velocity ($\Omega_i$), for synthesizing enough $^{56}$Ni mass to explain HNe ($M_{^{56}\mathrm{Ni}}\gtrsim 0.2M_\odot$), i.e. $(B_p/10^{16}~\mathrm{G})^{1/2}(\Omega_i/10^4~\mathrm{rad~s}^{-1})\gtrsim 0.7$.
  • We investigate the possible origin of extended emissions (EEs) of short gamma-ray bursts with an isotropic energy of ~ 10^(50-51) erg and a duration of a few 10 s to ~ 100 s, based on a compact binary (neutron star (NS)-NS or NS-black hole (BH)) merger scenario. We analyze the evolution of magnetized neutrino-dominated accretion disks of mass ~ 0.1 M_sun around BHs formed after the mergers, and estimate the power of relativistic outflows via the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) process. We show that a rotation energy of the BH up to > 10^52 erg can be extracted with an observed time scale of > 30 (1+z) s with a relatively small disk viscosity parameter of alpha < 0.01. Such a BZ power dissipates by clashing with non-relativistic pre-ejected matter of mass M ~ 10^-(2-4) M_sun, and forms a mildly relativistic fireball. We show that the dissipative photospheric emissions from such fireballs are likely in the soft X-ray band (1-10 keV) for M ~ 10^-2 M_sun possibly in NS-NS mergers, and in the BAT band (15-150 keV) for M ~ 10^-4 M_sun possibly in NS-BH mergers. In the former case, such soft EEs can provide a good chance of ~ 6 yr^-1 for simultaneous detections of the gravitational waves with a ~ 0.1 deg angular resolution by soft X-ray survey facilities like Wide-Field MAXI.
  • The ultra-strong magnetic field of magnetars modifies the neutrino cross section due to the parity violation of the weak interaction and can induce asymmetric propagation of neutrinos. Such an anisotropic neutrino radiation transfers not only the linear momentum of a neutron star but also the angular momentum, if a strong toroidal field is embedded inside the stellar interior. As such, the hidden toroidal field implied by recent observations potentially affects the rotational spin evolution of new-born magnetars. We analytically solve the transport equation for neutrinos and evaluate the degree of anisotropy that causes the magnetar to spin-up or spin-down during the early neutrino cooling phase. Supposing that after the neutrino cooling phase the dominant process causing the magnetar spin-down is the canonical magnetic dipole radiation, we compare the solution with the observed present rotational periods of anomalous X-ray pulsars 1E 1841-045 and 1E 2259+586, whose poloidal (dipole) fields are $\sim 10^{15}$ G and $10^{14}$ G, respectively. Combining with the supernova remnant age associated with these magnetars, the present evaluation implies a rough constraint of global (average) toroidal field strength at $B^\phi\lesssim 10^{15}$ G.
  • We present a review of a broad selection of nuclear matter equations of state (EOSs) applicable in core-collapse supernova studies. The large variety of nuclear matter properties, such as the symmetry energy, which are covered by these EOSs leads to distinct outcomes in supernova simulations. Many of the currently used EOS models can be ruled out by nuclear experiments, nuclear many-body calculations, and observations of neutron stars. In particular the two classical supernova EOS describe neutron matter poorly. Nevertheless, we explore their impact in supernova simulations since they are commonly used in astrophysics. They serve as extremely soft and stiff representative nuclear models. The corresponding supernova simulations represent two extreme cases, e.g., with respect to the protoneutron star (PNS) compactness and shock evolution. Moreover, in multi-dimensional supernova simulations EOS differences have a strong effect on the explosion dynamics. Because of the extreme behaviors of the classical supernova EOSs we also include DD2, a relativistic mean field EOS with density-dependent couplings, which is in satisfactory agreement with many current nuclear and observational constraints. This is the first time that DD2 is applied to supernova simulations and compared with the classical supernova EOS. We find that the overall behaviour of the latter EOS in supernova simulations lies in between the two extreme classical EOSs. As pointed out in previous studies, we confirm the impact of the symmetry energy on the electron fraction. Furthermore, we find that the symmetry energy becomes less important during the post bounce evolution, where conversely the symmetric part of the EOS becomes increasingly dominating, which is related to the high temperatures obtained. Moreover, we study the possible impact of quark matter at high densities and light nuclear clusters at low and intermediate dens
  • We present numerical results on two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic core-collapse simulations of an 11.2$M_\odot$ star. By changing numerical resolutions and seed perturbations systematically, we study how the postbounce dynamics is different in 2D and 3D. The calculations were performed with an energy-dependent treatment of the neutrino transport based on the isotropic diffusion source approximation scheme, which we have updated to achieve a very high computational efficiency. All the computed models in this work including nine 3D models and fifteen 2D models exhibit the revival of the stalled bounce shock, leading to the possibility of explosion. All of them are driven by the neutrino-heating mechanism, which is fostered by neutrino-driven convection and the standing-accretion-shock instability (SASI). Reflecting the stochastic nature of multi-dimensional (multi-D) neutrino-driven explosions, the blast morphology changes from models to models. However, we find that the final fate of the multi-D models whether an explosion is obtained or not, is little affected by the explosion stochasticity. In agreement with some previous studies, higher numerical resolutions lead to slower onset of the shock revival in both 3D and 2D. Based on the self-consistent supernova models leading to the possibility of explosions, our results systematically show that the revived shock expands more energetically in 2D than in 3D.
  • The gravitational collapse, bounce, the explosion of an iron core of an 11.2 $M_{\odot}$ star is simulated by two-dimensional neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic code. The explosion is driven by the neutrino heating aided by multi-dimensional hydrodynamic effects such as the convection. Following the explosion phase, we continue the simulation focusing on the thermal evolution of the protoneutron star up to $\sim$70 s when the crust of the neutron star is formed using one-dimensional simulation. We find that the crust forms at high-density region ($\rho\sim10^{14}$ g cm$^{-3}$) and it would proceed from inside to outside. This is the first self-consistent simulation that successfully follows from the collapse phase to the protoneutron star cooling phase based on the multi-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation.
  • Stationary pulsar magnetospheres in the force-free system are governed by the pulsar equation. In 1999, Contopoulos, Kazanas, and Fendt (hereafter CKF) numerically solved the pulsar equation and obtained a pulsar magnetosphere model called the CKF solution that has both closed and open magnetic field lines. The CKF solution is a successful solution, but it contains a poloidal current sheet that flows along the last open field line. This current sheet is artificially added to make the current system closed. In this paper, we suggest an alternative method to solve the pulsar equation and construct pulsar magnetosphere models without a current sheet. In our method, the pulsar equation is decomposed into Ampere's law and the force-free condition. We numerically solve these equations simultaneously with a fixed poloidal current. As a result, we obtain a pulsar magnetosphere model without a current sheet, which is similar to the CKF solution near the neutron star and has a jet-like structure at a distance along the pole. In addition, we discuss physical properties of the model and find that the force-free condition breaks down in a vicinity of the light cylinder due to dissipation that is included implicitly in the numerical method.
  • Long GRBs (LGRBs) have typical duration of ~ 30 s and some of them are associated with hypernovae, like Type Ic SN 1998bw. Wolf-Rayet stars are the most plausible LGRB progenitors, since the free-fall time of the envelope is consistent with the duration, and the natural outcome of the progenitor is a Type Ic SN. While a new population of ultra-long GRBs (ULGRBs), GRB 111209A, GRB 101225A, and GRB 121027A, has a duration of ~ 10^4 s, two of them are accompanied by superluminous-supernova (SLSN) like bumps, which are <~ 10 times brighter than typical hypernovae. Wolf-Rayet progenitors cannot explain ULGRBs because of too long duration and too bright SN-like bump. A blue supergiant (BSG) progenitor model, however, can explain the duration of ULGRBs. Moreover, SLSN-like bump can be attributed to the so-called cocoon-fireball photospheric emissions (CFPEs). Since a large cocoon is inevitably produced during the relativistic jet piercing though the BSG envelope, this component can be a smoking-gun evidence of BSG model for ULGRBs. In this paper, we examine u, g, r, i, and J-band light curves of three ULGRBs and demonstrate that they can be fitted quite well by our BSG model with the appropriate choices of the jet opening angle and the number density of the ambient gas. In addition, we predict that for 121027A, SLSN-like bump could have been observed for ~ 20 - 80 days after the burst. We also propose that some SLSNe might be CFPEs of off-axis ULGRBs without visible prompt emission.
  • Metal-poor massive stars may typically end up their lives as blue supergiants (BSGs). Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from such progenitors could have ultra-long duration of relativistic jets. For example Population III (Pop III) GRBs at z ~ 10-20 might be observable as X-ray rich events with a typical duration of T_90 ~ 10^4(1+z) sec. Recent GRB111209A at z = 0.677 has an ultra long duration of T_90 ~ 2.5*10^4 sec so that it have been suggested that the progenitor might be a metal-poor BSGs in the local universe. Here, we suggest luminous UV/optical/infrared emissions associated with such a new class of GRB from metal poor BSGs. Before the jet head breaks out the progenitor envelope, the energy injected by the jet is stored in a hot-plasma cocoon, which finally emerges and expands as a baryon-loaded fireball. We show that the photospheric emissions from the cocoon fireball could be intrinsically very bright (L_peak ~ 10^(42-44) erg/sec) in UV/optical bands (E_peak ~ 10 eV) with a typical duration of ~ 100 days in the rest frame. Such cocoon emissions from Pop III GRB might be detectable in infrared bands at ~ years after Pop III GRBs at up to z ~ 15 by up-coming facilities like JWST. We also suggest that GRB111209A might have been rebrightening in UV/optical bands up to an AB magnitude of < 26. The cocoon emissions from local metal-poor BSGs might have been already observed as luminous supernovae without GRB since they can be seen from the off-axis direction of the jet.
  • By implementing widely-used equations of state (EOS) from Lattimer & Swesty (LS) and H. Shen et al. (SHEN) in core-collapse supernova simulations, we explore possible impacts of these EOS on the post-bounce dynamics prior to the onset of neutrino-driven explosions. Our spherically symmetric (1D) and axially symmetric (2D) models are based on neutrino radiation hydrodynamics including spectral transport, which is solved by the isotropic diffusion source approximation. We confirm that in 1D simulations neutrino-driven explosions cannot be obtained for any of the employed EOS. Impacts of the EOS on the post-bounce hydrodynamics are more clearly visible in 2D simulations. In 2D models of a 15 M_sun progenitor using the LS EOS, the stalled bounce shock expands to increasingly larger radii, which is not the case using the SHEN EOS. Keeping in mind that the omission of the energy drain by heavy-lepton neutrinos in the present scheme could facilitate explosions, we find that 2D models of an 11.2 M_sun progenitor produce neutrino-driven explosions for all the EOS under investigation. Models using the LS EOS are slightly more energetic compared to those with the SHEN EOS. The more efficient neutrino heating in the LS models coincides with a higher electron antineutrino luminosity and a larger mass that is enclosed within the gain region. The models based on the LS EOS also show a more vigorous and aspherical downflow of accreting matter to the surface of the protoneutron star (PNS). The accretion pattern is essential for the production and strength of outgoing pressure waves, that can push in turn the shock to larger radii and provide more favorable conditions for the explosion. [abbreviated]
  • The neutrino annihilation is one of the most promising candidates for the jet production process of gamma-ray bursts. Although neutrino interaction rates depend strongly on the neutrino spectrum, the estimations of annihilation rate have been done with an assumption of the neutrino thermal spectrum based on the presence of the neutrinospheres, in which neutrinos and matter couple strongly. We consider the spectral change of neutrinos caused by the scattering by infalling materials and amplification of the annihilation rate. We solve the kinetic equation of neutrinos in spherically symmetric background flow and find that neutrinos are successfully accelerated and partly form nonthermal spectrum. We find that the accelerated neutrinos can significantly enhance the annihilation rate by a factor of $\sim 10$, depending on the injection optical depth.
  • Recent numerical simulations suggest that Population III (Pop III) stars were born with masses not larger than $\sim 100 M_{\odot}$ but typically $\sim 40M_{\odot}$. By self-consistently considering the jet generation and propagation in the envelope of these low mass Pop III stars, we find that a Pop III blue super giant star has the possibility to raise a gamma-ray burst (GRB) even though it keeps a massive hydrogen envelope. We evaluate observational characters of Pop III GRBs and predict that Pop III GRBs have the duration of $\sim 10^5$ sec in the observer frame and the peak luminosity of $\sim 5 \times 10^{50} {\rm erg} {\rm sec}^{-1}$. Assuming that the $E_p-L_p$ (or $E_p-E_{\gamma, \rm iso}$) correlation holds for Pop III GRBs, we find that the spectrum peak energy falls $\sim$ a few keV (or $\sim 100$ keV) in the observer frame. We discuss the detectability of Pop III GRBs by future satellite missions such as EXIST and Lobster. If the $E_p-E_{\gamma, \rm iso}$ correlation holds, we have the possibility to detect Pop III GRBs at $z \sim 9$ as long duration X-ray rich GRBs by EXIST. On the other hand, if the $E_p-L_p$ correlation holds, we have the possibility to detect Pop III GRBs up to $z \sim 19$ as long duration X-ray flashes by Lobster.
  • This is a status report on our endeavor to reveal the mechanism of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) by large-scale numerical simulations. Multi-dimensionality of the supernova engine, general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics, energy and lepton number transport by neutrinos emitted from the forming neutron star as well as nuclear interactions there, are all believed to play crucial roles in repelling infalling matter and producing energetic explosions. These ingredients are nonlinearly coupled with one another in the dynamics of core-collapse, bounce, and shock expansion. Serious quantitative studies of CCSNe hence make extensive numerical computations mandatory. Since neutrinos are neither in thermal nor in chemical equilibrium in general, their distributions in the phase space should be computed. This is a six dimensional (6D) neutrino transport problem and quite a challenge even for those with an access to the most advanced numerical resources such as the "K computer". To tackle this problem, we have embarked on multi-front efforts. In particular we report in this paper our recent progresses in the treatments of multi-dimensional (multi-D) radiation-hydrodynamics. We are currently proceeding on two different paths to the ultimate goal; in one approach we employ an approximate but highly efficient scheme for neutrino transport and treat 3D hydrodynamics and/or general relativity rigorously; some neutrino-driven explosions will be presented and comparisons will be made between 2D and 3D models quantitatively; in the second approach, on the other hand, exact but so far Newtonian Boltzmann equations are solved in two and three spatial dimensions; we will show some demonstrative test simulations. We will also address the perspectives of exa-scale computations on the next generation supercomputers.
  • We investigate the propagation of accretion-powered jets in various types of massive stars such as Wolf-Rayet stars, light Population III (Pop III) stars, and massive Pop III stars, all of which are the progenitor candidates of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). We perform two dimensional axisymmetric simulations of relativistic hydrodynamics taking into account both the envelope collapse and the jet propagation (i.e., the negative feedback of the jet on the accretion). Based on our hydrodynamic simulations, we show for the first time that the accretion-powered jet can potentially break out relativistically from the outer layers of Pop III progenitors. In our simulations, the accretion rate is estimated by the mass flux going through the inner boundary, and the jet is injected with a fixed accretion-to-jet conversion efficiency $\eta$. By varying the efficiency $\eta$ and opening angle $\theta_{op}$ for more than 40 models, we find that the jet can make a relativistic breakout from all types of progenitors for GRBs if a simple condition $\eta \gtrsim 10^{-4} (\theta_{op}/8^{\circ})^2$ is satisfied, which is consistent with analytical estimates. Otherwise no explosion or some failed spherical explosions occur.
  • Core-collapse supernovae are dramatic explosions marking the catastrophic end of massive stars. The only means to get direct information about the supernova engine is from observations of neutrinos emitted by the forming neutron star, and through gravitational waves which are produced when the hydrodynamic flow or the neutrino flux is not perfectly spherically symmetric. The multidimensionality of the supernova engine, which breaks the sphericity of the central core such as convection, rotation, magnetic fields, and hydrodynamic instabilities of the supernova shock, is attracting great attention as the most important ingredient to understand the long-veiled explosion mechanism. Based on our recent work, we summarize properties of gravitational waves, neutrinos, and explosive nucleosynthesis obtained in a series of our multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations and discuss how the mystery of the central engines can be unraveled by deciphering these multimessengers produced under the thick veils of massive stars.