• In this paper, we consider the mixture of sparse linear regressions model. Let ${\beta}^{(1)},\ldots,{\beta}^{(L)}\in\mathbb{C}^n$ be $ L $ unknown sparse parameter vectors with a total of $ K $ non-zero coefficients. Noisy linear measurements are obtained in the form $y_i={x}_i^H {\beta}^{(\ell_i)} + w_i$, each of which is generated randomly from one of the sparse vectors with the label $ \ell_i $ unknown. The goal is to estimate the parameter vectors efficiently with low sample and computational costs. This problem presents significant challenges as one needs to simultaneously solve the demixing problem of recovering the labels $ \ell_i $ as well as the estimation problem of recovering the sparse vectors $ {\beta}^{(\ell)} $. Our solution to the problem leverages the connection between modern coding theory and statistical inference. We introduce a new algorithm, Mixed-Coloring, which samples the mixture strategically using query vectors $ {x}_i $ constructed based on ideas from sparse graph codes. Our novel code design allows for both efficient demixing and parameter estimation. In the noiseless setting, for a constant number of sparse parameter vectors, our algorithm achieves the order-optimal sample and time complexities of $\Theta(K)$. In the presence of Gaussian noise, for the problem with two parameter vectors (i.e., $L=2$), we show that the Robust Mixed-Coloring algorithm achieves near-optimal $\Theta(K polylog(n))$ sample and time complexities. When $K=O(n^{\alpha})$ for some constant $\alpha\in(0,1)$ (i.e., $K$ is sublinear in $n$), we can achieve sample and time complexities both sublinear in the ambient dimension. In one of our experiments, to recover a mixture of two regressions with dimension $n=500$ and sparsity $K=50$, our algorithm is more than $300$ times faster than EM algorithm, with about one third of its sample cost.
  • This paper studies the Tensor Robust Principal Component (TRPCA) problem which extends the known Robust PCA (Candes et al. 2011) to the tensor case. Our model is based on a new tensor Singular Value Decomposition (t-SVD) (Kilmer and Martin 2011) and its induced tensor tubal rank and tensor nuclear norm. Consider that we have a 3-way tensor ${\mathcal{X}}\in\mathbb{R}^{n_1\times n_2\times n_3}$ such that ${\mathcal{X}}={\mathcal{L}}_0+{\mathcal{E}}_0$, where ${\mathcal{L}}_0$ has low tubal rank and ${\mathcal{E}}_0$ is sparse. Is that possible to recover both components? In this work, we prove that under certain suitable assumptions, we can recover both the low-rank and the sparse components exactly by simply solving a convex program whose objective is a weighted combination of the tensor nuclear norm and the $\ell_1$-norm, i.e., $\min_{{\mathcal{L}},\ {\mathcal{E}}} \ \|{{\mathcal{L}}}\|_*+\lambda\|{{\mathcal{E}}}\|_1, \ \text{s.t.} \ {\mathcal{X}}={\mathcal{L}}+{\mathcal{E}}$, where $\lambda= {1}/{\sqrt{\max(n_1,n_2)n_3}}$. Interestingly, TRPCA involves RPCA as a special case when $n_3=1$ and thus it is a simple and elegant tensor extension of RPCA. Also numerical experiments verify our theory and the application for the image denoising demonstrates the effectiveness of our method.
  • Low-rank modeling plays a pivotal role in signal processing and machine learning, with applications ranging from collaborative filtering, video surveillance, medical imaging, to dimensionality reduction and adaptive filtering. Many modern high-dimensional data and interactions thereof can be modeled as lying approximately in a low-dimensional subspace or manifold, possibly with additional structures, and its proper exploitations lead to significant reduction of costs in sensing, computation and storage. In recent years, there is a plethora of progress in understanding how to exploit low-rank structures using computationally efficient procedures in a provable manner, including both convex and nonconvex approaches. On one side, convex relaxations such as nuclear norm minimization often lead to statistically optimal procedures for estimating low-rank matrices, where first-order methods are developed to address the computational challenges; on the other side, there is emerging evidence that properly designed nonconvex procedures, such as projected gradient descent, often provide globally optimal solutions with a much lower computational cost in many problems. This survey article will provide a unified overview of these recent advances on low-rank matrix estimation from incomplete measurements. Attention is paid to rigorous characterization of the performance of these algorithms, and to problems where the low-rank matrix have additional structural properties that require new algorithmic designs and theoretical analysis.
  • In this paper, we consider the Tensor Robust Principal Component Analysis (TRPCA) problem, which aims to exactly recover the low-rank and sparse components from their sum. Our model is based on the recently proposed tensor-tensor product (or t-product) [13]. Induced by the t-product, we first rigorously deduce the tensor spectral norm, tensor nuclear norm, and tensor average rank, and show that the tensor nuclear norm is the convex envelope of the tensor average rank within the unit ball of the tensor spectral norm. These definitions, their relationships and properties are consistent with matrix cases. Equipped with the new tensor nuclear norm, we then solve the TRPCA problem by solving a convex program and provide the theoretical guarantee for the exact recovery. Our TRPCA model and recovery guarantee include matrix RPCA as a special case. Numerical experiments verify our results, and the applications to image recovery and background modeling problems demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.
  • In this paper, we introduce a powerful technique, Leave-One-Out, to the analysis of low-rank matrix completion problems. Using this technique, we develop a general approach for obtaining fine-grained, entry-wise bounds on iterative stochastic procedures. We demonstrate the power of this approach in analyzing two of the most important algorithms for matrix completion: the non-convex approach based on Singular Value Projection (SVP), and the convex relaxation approach based on nuclear norm minimization (NNM). In particular, we prove for the first time that the original form of SVP, without re-sampling or sample splitting, converges linearly in the infinity norm. We further apply our leave-one-out approach to an iterative procedure that arises in the analysis of the dual solutions of NNM. Our results show that NNM recovers the true $ d $-by-$ d $ rank-$ r $ matrix with $\mathcal{O}(\mu^2 r^3d \log d )$ observed entries, which has optimal dependence on the dimension and is independent of the condition number of the matrix. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first sample complexity result for a tractable matrix completion algorithm that satisfies these two properties simultaneously.
  • We consider the problem of estimating the discrete clustering structures under Sub-Gaussian Mixture Models. Our main results establish a hidden integrality property of a semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxation for this problem: while the optimal solutions to the SDP are not integer-valued in general, their estimation errors can be upper bounded in terms of the error of an idealized integer program. The error of the integer program, and hence that of the SDP, are further shown to decay exponentially in the signal-to-noise ratio. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first exponentially decaying error bound for convex relaxations of mixture models, and our results reveal the "global-to-local" mechanism that drives the performance of the SDP relaxation. A corollary of our results shows that in certain regimes the SDP solutions are in fact integral and exact, improving on existing exact recovery results for convex relaxations. More generally, our results establish sufficient conditions for the SDP to correctly recover the cluster memberships of $(1-\delta)$ fraction of the points for any $\delta\in(0,1)$. As a special case, we show that under the $d$-dimensional Stochastic Ball Model, SDP achieves non-trivial (sometimes exact) recovery when the center separation is as small as $\sqrt{1/d}$, which complements previous exact recovery results that require constant separation.
  • In large-scale distributed learning, security issues have become increasingly important. Particularly in a decentralized environment, some computing units may behave abnormally, or even exhibit Byzantine failures---arbitrary and potentially adversarial behavior. In this paper, we develop distributed learning algorithms that are provably robust against such failures, with a focus on achieving optimal statistical performance. A main result of this work is a sharp analysis of two robust distributed gradient descent algorithms based on median and trimmed mean operations, respectively. We prove statistical error rates for three kinds of population loss functions: strongly convex, non-strongly convex, and smooth non-convex. In particular, these algorithms are shown to achieve order-optimal statistical error rates for strongly convex losses. To achieve better communication efficiency, we further propose a median-based distributed algorithm that is provably robust, and uses only one communication round. For strongly convex quadratic loss, we show that this algorithm achieves the same optimal error rate as the robust distributed gradient descent algorithms.
  • In this paper we consider the cluster estimation problem under the Stochastic Block Model. We show that the semidefinite programming (SDP) formulation for this problem achieves an error rate that decays exponentially in the signal-to-noise ratio. The error bound implies weak recovery in the sparse graph regime with bounded expected degrees, as well as exact recovery in the dense regime. An immediate corollary of our results yields error bounds under the Censored Block Model. Moreover, these error bounds are robust, continuing to hold under heterogeneous edge probabilities and a form of the so-called monotone attack. Significantly, this error rate is achieved by the SDP solution itself without any further pre- or post-processing, and improves upon existing polynomially-decaying error bounds proved using the Grothendieck\textquoteright s inequality. Our analysis has two key ingredients: (i) showing that the graph has a well-behaved spectrum, even in the sparse regime, after discounting an exponentially small number of edges, and (ii) an order-statistics argument that governs the final error rate. Both arguments highlight the implicit regularization effect of the SDP formulation.
  • We consider the problem of distributed statistical machine learning in adversarial settings, where some unknown and time-varying subset of working machines may be compromised and behave arbitrarily to prevent an accurate model from being learned. This setting captures the potential adversarial attacks faced by Federated Learning -- a modern machine learning paradigm that is proposed by Google researchers and has been intensively studied for ensuring user privacy. Formally, we focus on a distributed system consisting of a parameter server and $m$ working machines. Each working machine keeps $N/m$ data samples, where $N$ is the total number of samples. The goal is to collectively learn the underlying true model parameter of dimension $d$. In classical batch gradient descent methods, the gradients reported to the server by the working machines are aggregated via simple averaging, which is vulnerable to a single Byzantine failure. In this paper, we propose a Byzantine gradient descent method based on the geometric median of means of the gradients. We show that our method can tolerate $q \le (m-1)/2$ Byzantine failures, and the parameter estimate converges in $O(\log N)$ rounds with an estimation error of $\sqrt{d(2q+1)/N}$, hence approaching the optimal error rate $\sqrt{d/N}$ in the centralized and failure-free setting. The total computational complexity of our algorithm is of $O((Nd/m) \log N)$ at each working machine and $O(md + kd \log^3 N)$ at the central server, and the total communication cost is of $O(m d \log N)$. We further provide an application of our general results to the linear regression problem. A key challenge arises in the above problem is that Byzantine failures create arbitrary and unspecified dependency among the iterations and the aggregated gradients. We prove that the aggregated gradient converges uniformly to the true gradient function.
  • We study two $2$-dimensional Teichm\"uller spaces of surfaces with boundary and marked points, namely, the pentagon and the punctured triangle. We show that their geometry is quite different from Teichm\"uller spaces of closed surfaces. Indeed, both spaces are exhausted by regular convex geodesic polygons with a fixed number of sides, and their geodesics diverge at most linearly.
  • We consider the problem of Robust PCA in the fully and partially observed settings. Without corruptions, this is the well-known matrix completion problem. From a statistical standpoint this problem has been recently well-studied, and conditions on when recovery is possible (how many observations do we need, how many corruptions can we tolerate) via polynomial-time algorithms is by now understood. This paper presents and analyzes a non-convex optimization approach that greatly reduces the computational complexity of the above problems, compared to the best available algorithms. In particular, in the fully observed case, with $r$ denoting rank and $d$ dimension, we reduce the complexity from $\mathcal{O}(r^2d^2\log(1/\varepsilon))$ to $\mathcal{O}(rd^2\log(1/\varepsilon))$ -- a big savings when the rank is big. For the partially observed case, we show the complexity of our algorithm is no more than $\mathcal{O}(r^4d \log d \log(1/\varepsilon))$. Not only is this the best-known run-time for a provable algorithm under partial observation, but in the setting where $r$ is small compared to $d$, it also allows for near-linear-in-$d$ run-time that can be exploited in the fully-observed case as well, by simply running our algorithm on a subset of the observations.
  • This paper considers the problem of matrix completion when some number of the columns are completely and arbitrarily corrupted, potentially by a malicious adversary. It is well-known that standard algorithms for matrix completion can return arbitrarily poor results, if even a single column is corrupted. One direct application comes from robust collaborative filtering. Here, some number of users are so-called manipulators who try to skew the predictions of the algorithm by calibrating their inputs to the system. In this paper, we develop an efficient algorithm for this problem based on a combination of a trimming procedure and a convex program that minimizes the nuclear norm and the $\ell_{1,2}$ norm. Our theoretical results show that given a vanishing fraction of observed entries, it is nevertheless possible to complete the underlying matrix even when the number of corrupted columns grows. Significantly, our results hold without any assumptions on the locations or values of the observed entries of the manipulated columns. Moreover, we show by an information-theoretic argument that our guarantees are nearly optimal in terms of the fraction of sampled entries on the authentic columns, the fraction of corrupted columns, and the rank of the underlying matrix. Our results therefore sharply characterize the tradeoffs between sample, robustness and rank in matrix completion.
  • The stochastic block model (SBM) is a popular framework for studying community detection in networks. This model is limited by the assumption that all nodes in the same community are statistically equivalent and have equal expected degrees. The degree-corrected stochastic block model (DCSBM) is a natural extension of SBM that allows for degree heterogeneity within communities. This paper proposes a convexified modularity maximization approach for estimating the hidden communities under DCSBM. Our approach is based on a convex programming relaxation of the classical (generalized) modularity maximization formulation, followed by a novel doubly-weighted $ \ell_1 $-norm $ k $-median procedure. We establish non-asymptotic theoretical guarantees for both approximate clustering and perfect clustering. Our approximate clustering results are insensitive to the minimum degree, and hold even in sparse regime with bounded average degrees. In the special case of SBM, these theoretical results match the best-known performance guarantees of computationally feasible algorithms. Numerically, we provide an efficient implementation of our algorithm, which is applied to both synthetic and real-world networks. Experiment results show that our method enjoys competitive performance compared to the state of the art in the literature.
  • Optimization problems with rank constraints arise in many applications, including matrix regression, structured PCA, matrix completion and matrix decomposition problems. An attractive heuristic for solving such problems is to factorize the low-rank matrix, and to run projected gradient descent on the nonconvex factorized optimization problem. The goal of this problem is to provide a general theoretical framework for understanding when such methods work well, and to characterize the nature of the resulting fixed point. We provide a simple set of conditions under which projected gradient descent, when given a suitable initialization, converges geometrically to a statistically useful solution. Our results are applicable even when the initial solution is outside any region of local convexity, and even when the problem is globally concave. Working in a non-asymptotic framework, we show that our conditions are satisfied for a wide range of concrete models, including matrix regression, structured PCA, matrix completion with real and quantized observations, matrix decomposition, and graph clustering problems. Simulation results show excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions.
  • Many models for sparse regression typically assume that the covariates are known completely, and without noise. Particularly in high-dimensional applications, this is often not the case. This paper develops efficient OMP-like algorithms to deal with precisely this setting. Our algorithms are as efficient as OMP, and improve on the best-known results for missing and noisy data in regression, both in the high-dimensional setting where we seek to recover a sparse vector from only a few measurements, and in the classical low-dimensional setting where we recover an unstructured regressor. In the high-dimensional setting, our support-recovery algorithm requires no knowledge of even the statistics of the noise. Along the way, we also obtain improved performance guarantees for OMP for the standard sparse regression problem with Gaussian noise.
  • We consider two closely related problems: planted clustering and submatrix localization. The planted clustering problem assumes that a random graph is generated based on some underlying clusters of the nodes; the task is to recover these clusters given the graph. The submatrix localization problem concerns locating hidden submatrices with elevated means inside a large real-valued random matrix. Of particular interest is the setting where the number of clusters/submatrices is allowed to grow unbounded with the problem size. These formulations cover several classical models such as planted clique, planted densest subgraph, planted partition, planted coloring, and stochastic block model, which are widely used for studying community detection and clustering/bi-clustering. For both problems, we show that the space of the model parameters (cluster/submatrix size, cluster density, and submatrix mean) can be partitioned into four disjoint regions corresponding to decreasing statistical and computational complexities: (1) the \emph{impossible} regime, where all algorithms fail; (2) the \emph{hard} regime, where the computationally expensive Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE) succeeds; (3) the \emph{easy} regime, where the polynomial-time convexified MLE succeeds; (4) the \emph{simple} regime, where a simple counting/thresholding procedure succeeds. Moreover, we show that each of these algorithms provably fails in the previous harder regimes. Our theorems establish the minimax recovery limit, which are tight up to constants and hold with a growing number of clusters/submatrices, and provide a stronger performance guarantee than previously known for polynomial-time algorithms. Our study demonstrates the tradeoffs between statistical and computational considerations, and suggests that the minimax recovery limit may not be achievable by polynomial-time algorithms.
  • We consider the mixed regression problem with two components, under adversarial and stochastic noise. We give a convex optimization formulation that provably recovers the true solution, and provide upper bounds on the recovery errors for both arbitrary noise and stochastic noise settings. We also give matching minimax lower bounds (up to log factors), showing that under certain assumptions, our algorithm is information-theoretically optimal. Our results represent the first tractable algorithm guaranteeing successful recovery with tight bounds on recovery errors and sample complexity.
  • This paper considers the matrix completion problem. We show that it is not necessary to assume joint incoherence, which is a standard but unintuitive and restrictive condition that is imposed by previous studies. This leads to a sample complexity bound that is order-wise optimal with respect to the incoherence parameter (as well as to the rank $r$ and the matrix dimension $n$ up to a log factor). As a consequence, we improve the sample complexity of recovering a semidefinite matrix from $O(nr^{2}\log^{2}n)$ to $O(nr\log^{2}n)$, and the highest allowable rank from $\Theta(\sqrt{n}/\log n)$ to $\Theta(n/\log^{2}n)$. The key step in proof is to obtain new bounds on the $\ell_{\infty,2}$-norm, defined as the maximum of the row and column norms of a matrix. To illustrate the applicability of our techniques, we discuss extensions to SVD projection, structured matrix completion and semi-supervised clustering, for which we provide order-wise improvements over existing results. Finally, we turn to the closely-related problem of low-rank-plus-sparse matrix decomposition. We show that the joint incoherence condition is unavoidable here for polynomial-time algorithms conditioned on the Planted Clique conjecture. This means it is intractable in general to separate a rank-$\omega(\sqrt{n})$ positive semidefinite matrix and a sparse matrix. Interestingly, our results show that the standard and joint incoherence conditions are associated respectively with the information (statistical) and computational aspects of the matrix decomposition problem.
  • Graph clustering involves the task of dividing nodes into clusters, so that the edge density is higher within clusters as opposed to across clusters. A natural, classic and popular statistical setting for evaluating solutions to this problem is the stochastic block model, also referred to as the planted partition model. In this paper we present a new algorithm--a convexified version of Maximum Likelihood--for graph clustering. We show that, in the classic stochastic block model setting, it outperforms existing methods by polynomial factors when the cluster size is allowed to have general scalings. In fact, it is within logarithmic factors of known lower bounds for spectral methods, and there is evidence suggesting that no polynomial time algorithm would do significantly better. We then show that this guarantee carries over to a more general extension of the stochastic block model. Our method can handle the settings of semi-random graphs, heterogeneous degree distributions, unequal cluster sizes, unaffiliated nodes, partially observed graphs and planted clique/coloring etc. In particular, our results provide the best exact recovery guarantees to date for the planted partition, planted k-disjoint-cliques and planted noisy coloring models with general cluster sizes; in other settings, we match the best existing results up to logarithmic factors.
  • This paper considers the problem of clustering a partially observed unweighted graph---i.e., one where for some node pairs we know there is an edge between them, for some others we know there is no edge, and for the remaining we do not know whether or not there is an edge. We want to organize the nodes into disjoint clusters so that there is relatively dense (observed) connectivity within clusters, and sparse across clusters. We take a novel yet natural approach to this problem, by focusing on finding the clustering that minimizes the number of "disagreements"---i.e., the sum of the number of (observed) missing edges within clusters, and (observed) present edges across clusters. Our algorithm uses convex optimization; its basis is a reduction of disagreement minimization to the problem of recovering an (unknown) low-rank matrix and an (unknown) sparse matrix from their partially observed sum. We evaluate the performance of our algorithm on the classical Planted Partition/Stochastic Block Model. Our main theorem provides sufficient conditions for the success of our algorithm as a function of the minimum cluster size, edge density and observation probability; in particular, the results characterize the tradeoff between the observation probability and the edge density gap. When there are a constant number of clusters of equal size, our results are optimal up to logarithmic factors.
  • Matrix completion, i.e., the exact and provable recovery of a low-rank matrix from a small subset of its elements, is currently only known to be possible if the matrix satisfies a restrictive structural constraint---known as {\em incoherence}---on its row and column spaces. In these cases, the subset of elements is sampled uniformly at random. In this paper, we show that {\em any} rank-$ r $ $ n$-by-$ n $ matrix can be exactly recovered from as few as $O(nr \log^2 n)$ randomly chosen elements, provided this random choice is made according to a {\em specific biased distribution}: the probability of any element being sampled should be proportional to the sum of the leverage scores of the corresponding row, and column. Perhaps equally important, we show that this specific form of sampling is nearly necessary, in a natural precise sense; this implies that other perhaps more intuitive sampling schemes fail. We further establish three ways to use the above result for the setting when leverage scores are not known \textit{a priori}: (a) a sampling strategy for the case when only one of the row or column spaces are incoherent, (b) a two-phase sampling procedure for general matrices that first samples to estimate leverage scores followed by sampling for exact recovery, and (c) an analysis showing the advantages of weighted nuclear/trace-norm minimization over the vanilla un-weighted formulation for the case of non-uniform sampling.
  • In this paper, we study the quantization errors of modulo sigma-delta modulated finite, asymptotically-infinite, infinite causal stable ARMA processes. We prove that the normalized quantization error can be taken as a uniformly distributed white noise for all the cases. Moreover, we find that this nice property is guaranteed by two different mechanisms: the high-enough quantization resolution \cite{Bennett1948}-\cite{WidrowKollar2008} and the asymptotic convergence of quantization errors for some quasi-stationary processes \cite{ChouGray1991}-\cite{LiChenLiZhang2009}, for different cases. But the assumption of the smooth density of the sampled random processes is needed in all the cases.
  • We present a principled approach for detecting overlapping temporal community structure in dynamic networks. Our method is based on the following framework: find the overlapping temporal community structure that maximizes a quality function associated with each snapshot of the network subject to a temporal smoothness constraint. A novel quality function and a smoothness constraint are proposed to handle overlaps, and a new convex relaxation is used to solve the resulting combinatorial optimization problem. We provide theoretical guarantees as well as experimental results that reveal community structure in real and synthetic networks. Our main insight is that certain structures can be identified only when temporal correlation is considered and when communities are allowed to overlap. In general, discovering such overlapping temporal community structure can enhance our understanding of real-world complex networks by revealing the underlying stability behind their seemingly chaotic evolution.
  • This paper investigates graph clustering in the planted cluster model in the presence of {\em small clusters}. Traditional results dictate that for an algorithm to provably correctly recover the clusters, {\em all} clusters must be sufficiently large (in particular, $\tilde{\Omega}(\sqrt{n})$ where $n$ is the number of nodes of the graph). We show that this is not really a restriction: by a more refined analysis of the trace-norm based recovery approach proposed in Jalali et al. (2011) and Chen et al. (2012), we prove that small clusters, under certain mild assumptions, do not hinder recovery of large ones. Based on this result, we further devise an iterative algorithm to recover {\em almost all clusters} via a "peeling strategy", i.e., recover large clusters first, leading to a reduced problem, and repeat this procedure. These results are extended to the {\em partial observation} setting, in which only a (chosen) part of the graph is observed.The peeling strategy gives rise to an active learning algorithm, in which edges adjacent to smaller clusters are queried more often as large clusters are learned (and removed). From a high level, this paper sheds novel insights on high-dimensional statistics and learning structured data, by presenting a structured matrix learning problem for which a one shot convex relaxation approach necessarily fails, but a carefully constructed sequence of convex relaxationsdoes the job.
  • We consider high dimensional sparse regression, and develop strategies able to deal with arbitrary -- possibly, severe or coordinated -- errors in the covariance matrix $X$. These may come from corrupted data, persistent experimental errors, or malicious respondents in surveys/recommender systems, etc. Such non-stochastic error-in-variables problems are notoriously difficult to treat, and as we demonstrate, the problem is particularly pronounced in high-dimensional settings where the primary goal is {\em support recovery} of the sparse regressor. We develop algorithms for support recovery in sparse regression, when some number $n_1$ out of $n+n_1$ total covariate/response pairs are {\it arbitrarily (possibly maliciously) corrupted}. We are interested in understanding how many outliers, $n_1$, we can tolerate, while identifying the correct support. To the best of our knowledge, neither standard outlier rejection techniques, nor recently developed robust regression algorithms (that focus only on corrupted response variables), nor recent algorithms for dealing with stochastic noise or erasures, can provide guarantees on support recovery. Perhaps surprisingly, we also show that the natural brute force algorithm that searches over all subsets of $n$ covariate/response pairs, and all subsets of possible support coordinates in order to minimize regression error, is remarkably poor, unable to correctly identify the support with even $n_1 = O(n/k)$ corrupted points, where $k$ is the sparsity. This is true even in the basic setting we consider, where all authentic measurements and noise are independent and sub-Gaussian. In this setting, we provide a simple algorithm -- no more computationally taxing than OMP -- that gives stronger performance guarantees, recovering the support with up to $n_1 = O(n/(\sqrt{k} \log p))$ corrupted points, where $p$ is the dimension of the signal to be recovered.