• With the routine collection of massive-dimensional predictors in many application areas, screening methods that rapidly identify a small subset of promising predictors have become commonplace. We propose a new MOdular Bayes Screening (MOBS) approach, which involves several novel characteristics that can potentially lead to improved performance. MOBS first applies a Bayesian mixture model to the marginal distribution of the response, obtaining posterior samples of mixture weights, cluster-specific parameters, and cluster allocations for each subject. Hypothesis tests are then introduced, corresponding to whether or not to include a given predictor, with posterior probabilities for each hypothesis available analytically conditionally on unknowns sampled in the first stage and tuning parameters controlling borrowing of information across tests. By marginalizing over the first stage posterior samples, we avoid under-estimation of uncertainty typical of two-stage methods. We greatly simplify the model specification and reduce computational complexity by using {\em modularization}. We provide basic theoretical support for this approach, and illustrate excellent performance relative to competitors in simulation studies and the ability to capture complex shifts beyond simple differences in means. The method is illustrated with applications to genomics by using a very high-dimensional cis-eQTL dataset with roughly 38 million SNPs.
  • The large-scale structural ingredients of the brain and neural connectomes have been identified in recent years. These are, similar to the features found in many other real networks: the arrangement of brain regions into modules and the presence of highly connected regions (hubs) forming rich-clubs. Here, we examine how modules and hubs shape the collective dynamics on networks and we find that both ingredients lead to the emergence of complex dynamics. Comparing the connectomes of C. elegans, cats, macaques and humans to surrogate networks in which either modules or hubs are destroyed, we find that functional complexity always decreases in the perturbed networks. A comparison between simulated and empirically obtained resting-state functional connectivity indicates that the human brain, at rest, lies in a dynamical state that reflects the largest complexity its anatomical connectome can host. Last, we generalise the topology of neural connectomes into a new hierarchical network model that successfully combines modular organisation with rich-club forming hubs. This is achieved by centralising the cross-modular connections through a preferential attachment rule. Our network model hosts more complex dynamics than other hierarchical models widely used as benchmarks.