• Ensembles of decision trees are a useful tool for obtaining for obtaining flexible estimates of regression functions. Examples of these methods include gradient boosted decision trees, random forests, and Bayesian CART. Two potential shortcomings of tree ensembles are their lack of smoothness and vulnerability to the curse of dimensionality. We show that these issues can be overcome by instead considering sparsity inducing soft decision trees in which the decisions are treated as probabilistic. We implement this in the context of the Bayesian additive regression trees framework, and illustrate its promising performance through testing on benchmark datasets. We provide strong theoretical support for our methodology by showing that the posterior distribution concentrates at the minimax rate (up-to a logarithmic factor) for sparse functions and functions with additive structures in the high-dimensional regime where the dimensionality of the covariate space is allowed to grow near exponentially in the sample size. Our method also adapts to the unknown smoothness and sparsity levels, and can be implemented by making minimal modifications to existing BART algorithms.
  • We investigate a wide class of two-dimensional hyperbolic systems with singularities, and prove the almost sure invariance principle (ASIP) for the random process generated by sequences of dynamically H\"older observables. The observables could be unbounded, and the process may be non-stationary and need not have linearly growing variances. Our results apply to Anosov diffeomorphisms, Sinai dispersing billiards and their perturbations. The random processes under consideration are related to the fluctuation of Lyapunov exponents, the shrinking target problem, etc.
  • For any $C^\infty$, area-preserving Anosov diffeomorphism $f$ of a surface, we show that a suspension flow over $f$ is $C^\infty$-conjugate to a constant-time suspension flow of a hyperbolic automorphism of the two torus if and only if the volume measure is the measure with maximal entropy. We also show that the the metric entropy with respect to the volume measure and the topological entropy of suspension flow over Anosov diffeomorphisms on torus achieve all possible values. Our results fit into two programs related to entropy rigidity and flexibility of Anosov systems.
  • We provide a topological classification of locally constant functions over subshifts of finite type via their zero-temperature measures. Our approach is to analyze the relationship between the distribution of the zero-temperature measures and the boundary of higher dimensional generalized rotation sets. We also discuss the regularity of the localized entropy function on the boundary of the generalized rotation sets.
  • In this paper, we present a criterion for pitchfork bifurcation of smooth vector fields based on a topological argument. Our result expands Rajapakse and Smale's result \cite{RS2} significantly. Based on our criterion, we present a class of families of non-symmetric vector fields undergoing a pitchfork bifurcation.
  • We propose a family of variational approximations to Bayesian posterior distributions, called $\alpha$-VB, with provable statistical guarantees. The standard variational approximation is a special case of $\alpha$-VB with $\alpha=1$. When $\alpha \in(0,1]$, a novel class of variational inequalities are developed for linking the Bayes risk under the variational approximation to the objective function in the variational optimization problem, implying that maximizing the evidence lower bound in variational inference has the effect of minimizing the Bayes risk within the variational density family. Operating in a frequentist setup, the variational inequalities imply that point estimates constructed from the $\alpha$-VB procedure converge at an optimal rate to the true parameter in a wide range of problems. We illustrate our general theory with a number of examples, including the mean-field variational approximation to (low)-high-dimensional Bayesian linear regression with spike and slab priors, mixture of Gaussian models, latent Dirichlet allocation, and (mixture of) Gaussian variational approximation in regular parametric models.
  • The article addresses a long-standing open problem on the justification of using variational Bayes methods for parameter estimation. We provide general conditions for obtaining optimal risk bounds for point estimates acquired from mean-field variational Bayesian inference. The conditions pertain to the existence of certain test functions for the distance metric on the parameter space and minimal assumptions on the prior. A general recipe for verification of the conditions is outlined which is broadly applicable to existing Bayesian models with or without latent variables. As illustrations, specific applications to Latent Dirichlet Allocation and Gaussian mixture models are discussed.
  • Gaussian process (GP) regression is a powerful interpolation technique due to its flexibility in capturing non-linearity. In this paper, we provide a general framework for understanding the frequentist coverage of point-wise and simultaneous Bayesian credible sets in GP regression. As an intermediate result, we develop a Bernstein von-Mises type result under supremum norm in random design GP regression. Identifying both the mean and covariance function of the posterior distribution of the Gaussian process as regularized $M$-estimators, we show that the sampling distribution of the posterior mean function and the centered posterior distribution can be respectively approximated by two population level GPs. By developing a comparison inequality between two GPs, we provide exact characterization of frequentist coverage probabilities of Bayesian point-wise credible intervals and simultaneous credible bands of the regression function. Our results show that inference based on GP regression tends to be conservative; when the prior is under-smoothed, the resulting credible intervals and bands have minimax-optimal sizes, with their frequentist coverage converging to a non-degenerate value between their nominal level and one. As a byproduct of our theory, we show that the GP regression also yields minimax-optimal posterior contraction rate relative to the supremum norm, which provides a positive evidence to the long standing problem on optimal supremum norm contraction rate in GP regression.
  • In this paper, we propose a new method for estimation and constructing confidence intervals for low-dimensional components in a high-dimensional model. The proposed estimator, called Constrained Lasso (CLasso) estimator, is obtained by simultaneously solving two estimating equations---one imposing a zero-bias constraint for the low-dimensional parameter and the other forming an $\ell_1$-penalized procedure for the high-dimensional nuisance parameter. By carefully choosing the zero-bias constraint, the resulting estimator of the low dimensional parameter is shown to admit an asymptotically normal limit attaining the Cram\'{e}r-Rao lower bound in a semiparametric sense. We propose a tuning-free iterative algorithm for implementing the CLasso. We show that when the algorithm is initialized at the Lasso estimator, the de-sparsified estimator proposed in van de Geer et al. [\emph{Ann. Statist.} {\bf 42} (2014) 1166--1202] is asymptotically equivalent to the first iterate of the algorithm. We analyse the asymptotic properties of the CLasso estimator and show the globally linear convergence of the algorithm. We also demonstrate encouraging empirical performance of the CLasso through numerical studies.
  • In this paper, we propose a model of decentralized energy storages, who serve as instruments to shift energy supply intertemporally. From storages' perspective, we investigate their optimal buying or selling decisions under market uncertainty. The goal of this paper is to understand the economic value of future market information, as energy storages mitigate market uncertainty by forward-looking strategies. At a system level, we evaluate different information management policies to coordinate storages' actions and improve their aggregate profitability: (1) providing a publicly available market forecasting channel; (2) encouraging decentralized storages to share their private forecasts with each other; (3) releasing additional market information to a targeted subset of storages exclusively. We highlight the perils of too much market information provision and advice on exclusiveness of market forecast channel.
  • We obtain a nature generalization for an affine Sierpinski carpet and Sierpinski triangle to $n$-dimensional space, by using the generations and characterizations of affinely-equivalent Sierpinski carpet. Exactly, in this paper, a Menger sponge and Sierpinski simplex in $4$-dimensional space could be drawn out clearly under an affine transformation. Furthermore, the method could be used to a much broader class in fractals.
  • We consider nonparametric testing in a non-asymptotic framework. Our statistical guarantees are exact in the sense that Type I and II errors are controlled for any finite sample size. Meanwhile, one proposed test is shown to achieve minimax optimality in the asymptotic sense. An important consequence of this non-asymptotic theory is a new and practically useful formula for selecting the optimal smoothing parameter in nonparametric testing. The leading example in this paper is smoothing spline models under Gaussian errors. The results obtained therein can be further generalized to the kernel ridge regression framework under possibly non-Gaussian errors. Simulations demonstrate that our proposed test improves over the conventional asymptotic test when sample size is small to moderate.
  • In this article, we investigate large sample properties of model selection procedures in a general Bayesian framework when a closed form expression of the marginal likelihood function is not available or a local asymptotic quadratic approximation of the log-likelihood function does not exist. Under appropriate identifiability assumptions on the true model, we provide sufficient conditions for a Bayesian model selection procedure to be consistent and obey the Occam's razor phenomenon, i.e., the probability of selecting the "smallest" model that contains the truth tends to one as the sample size goes to infinity. In order to show that a Bayesian model selection procedure selects the smallest model containing the truth, we impose a prior anti-concentration condition, requiring the prior mass assigned by large models to a neighborhood of the truth to be sufficiently small. In a more general setting where the strong model identifiability assumption may not hold, we introduce the notion of local Bayesian complexity and develop oracle inequalities for Bayesian model selection procedures. Our Bayesian oracle inequality characterizes a trade-off between the approximation error and a Bayesian characterization of the local complexity of the model, illustrating the adaptive nature of averaging-based Bayesian procedures towards achieving an optimal rate of posterior convergence. Specific applications of the model selection theory are discussed in the context of high-dimensional nonparametric regression and density regression where the regression function or the conditional density is assumed to depend on a fixed subset of predictors. As a result of independent interest, we propose a general technique for obtaining upper bounds of certain small ball probability of stationary Gaussian processes.
  • Using the moving frame and invariants, any discrete curve in $\R^3$ could be uniquely identified by its centroaffine curvatures and torsions. In this paper, depending on the affine curvatures of the fractal curves, such as Koch curve and Hilbert curve, we can clearly describe their iterative regularities. Interestingly, by the affine curvatures, the fractal curves can be quantified and encoded accordingly to a sequence. Hence, it is more convenient for future reference. Given three starting points, we can directly generate the affine Koch curve and affine Hilbert curve at the step $n, \forall n\in \mathbb{Z}^+$. Certainly, if the initial three points are standard, the curve is the traditional Koch curve or Hilbert curve. By this method, the characteristic of some fractal curves which look like irregular could be quantified, and the regularities would become more obvious.
  • Any two equivalent discrete curves must have the same invariants at the corresponding points under an affine transformation. In this paper, we construct the moving frame and invariants for the discrete centroaffine curves, which could be used to discriminate the same discrete curves from different graphics, and estimate whether a polygon flow is stable or periodically stable. In fact, using the similar method as the Frenet-Serret frame, a discrete curve can be uniquely identified by its centroaffine curvatures and torsions. In 1878, Darboux studied the problem of midpoint iteration of polygons[12]. Berlekamp et al studied this problem in detail[2]. Now, through the centroaffine curvatures and torsions, the iteration process can be clearly quantified. Exactly, we describe the whole iteration process by using centroaffine curvatures and torsions, and its periodicity could be directly exhibited. As an application, we would obtain some stable discrete space curves with changeless curvatures and torsions after multistep iteration. For the pentagram map of a polygon, the affinely regular polygons are stable. Furthermore, we find the convex hexagons with parallel and equi-length opposite sides are periodically stable, and some convex parallel and equi-length opposite sides octagons are also periodically stable. The proofs of these results are obtained using the structure equations of the discrete cnetroaffine curves and the integrable conditions of its flows.
  • We consider the fractional posterior distribution that is obtained by updating a prior distribution via Bayes theorem with a fractional likelihood function, a usual likelihood function raised to a fractional power. First, we analyze the contraction property of the fractional posterior in a general misspecified framework. Our contraction results only require a prior mass condition on certain Kullback-Leibler (KL) neighborhood of the true parameter (or the KL divergence minimizer in the misspecified case), and obviate constructions of test functions and sieves commonly used in the literature for analyzing the contraction property of a regular posterior. We show through a counterexample that some condition controlling the complexity of the parameter space is necessary for the regular posterior to contract, rendering additional flexibility on the choice of the prior for the fractional posterior. Second, we derive a novel Bayesian oracle inequality based on a PAC-Bayes inequality in misspecified models. Our derivation reveals several advantages of averaging based Bayesian procedures over optimization based frequentist procedures. As an application of the Bayesian oracle inequality, we derive a sharp oracle inequality in the convex regression problem under an arbitrary dimension. We also illustrate the theory in Gaussian process regression and density estimation problems.
  • We present a Communication-efficient Surrogate Likelihood (CSL) framework for solving distributed statistical inference problems. CSL provides a communication-efficient surrogate to the global likelihood that can be used for low-dimensional estimation, high-dimensional regularized estimation and Bayesian inference. For low-dimensional estimation, CSL provably improves upon naive averaging schemes and facilitates the construction of confidence intervals. For high-dimensional regularized estimation, CSL leads to a minimax-optimal estimator with controlled communication cost. For Bayesian inference, CSL can be used to form a communication-efficient quasi-posterior distribution that converges to the true posterior. This quasi-posterior procedure significantly improves the computational efficiency of MCMC algorithms even in a non-distributed setting. We present both theoretical analysis and experiments to explore the properties of the CSL approximation.
  • In this paper we build the structure equations and the integrable systems for a discrete centroaffine indefinite surface in $\R^3$. At the same time, some centroaffine invariants are obtained according to the structure equations. Using these centroaffine invariants, we study the Laplacian operator and the convexity of a discrete centroaffine indefinite surface. Furthermore, some interest examples are provided.
  • Cloud computing provides scientists a platform that can deploy computation and data intensive applications without infrastructure investment. With excessive cloud resources and a decision support system, large generated data sets can be flexibly 1 stored locally in the current cloud, 2 deleted and regenerated whenever reused or 3 transferred to cheaper cloud service for storage. However, due to the pay for use model, the total application cost largely depends on the usage of computation, storage and bandwidth resources, hence cutting the cost of cloud based data storage becomes a big concern for deploying scientific applications in the cloud. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy that can cost effectively store large generated data sets with multiple cloud service providers. The strategy is based on a novel algorithm that finds the trade off among computation, storage and bandwidth costs in the cloud, which are three key factors for the cost of data storage. Both general (random) simulations conducted with popular cloud service providers pricing models and three specific case studies on real world scientific applications show that the proposed storage strategy is highly cost effective and practical for run time utilization in the cloud.
  • Let $\Diff^{ r}_m(M)$ be the set of $C^{ r}$ volume-preserving diffeomorphisms on a compact Riemannian manifold $M$ ($\dim M\geq 2$). In this paper, we prove that the diffeomorphisms without zero Lyapunov exponents on a set of positive volume are $C^1$ dense in $\Diff^{ r}_m(M), r\geq 1$. We also prove a weaker result for symplectic diffeomorphisms $\mathcal{S}ym^{r}_{\omega}(M), r\geq1 $ saying that the symplectic diffeomorphisms with non-zero Lyapunov exponents on a set of positive volume are $C^1$ dense in $\mathcal{S}ym^{r}_{\omega}(M), r\geq1 $.
  • In spite of the recent surge of interest in quantile regression, joint estimation of linear quantile planes remains a great challenge in statistics and econometrics. We propose a novel parametrization that characterizes any collection of non-crossing quantile planes over arbitrarily shaped convex predictor domains in any dimension by means of unconstrained scalar, vector and function valued parameters. Statistical models based on this parametrization inherit a fast computation of the likelihood function, enabling penalized likelihood or Bayesian approaches to model fitting. We introduce a complete Bayesian methodology by using Gaussian process prior distributions on the function valued parameters and develop a robust and efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation. The resulting method is shown to offer posterior consistency under mild tail and regularity conditions. We present several illustrative examples where the new method is compared against existing approaches and is found to offer better accuracy, coverage and model fit.
  • In this article we will discuss a new, mostly theoretical, method for solving (zero-dimensional) polynomial systems, which lies in between Gr\"obner basis computations and the heuristic first fall degree assumption and is not based on any heuristic. This method relies on the new concept of last fall degree. Let $k$ be a finite field of cardinality $q^n$ and let $k'$ be its subfield of cardinality $q$. Let $\mathcal{F} \subset k[X_0,\ldots,X_{m-1}]$ be a finite subset generating a zero-dimensional ideal. We give an upper bound of the last fall degree of the Weil descent system of $\mathcal{F}$, which depends on $q$, $m$, the last fall degree of $\mathcal{F}$, the degree of $\mathcal{F}$ and the number of solutions of $\mathcal{F}$, but not on $n$. This shows that such Weil descent systems can be solved efficiently if $n$ grows. In particular, we apply these results for multi-HFE and essentially show that multi-HFE is insecure. Finally, we discuss that the degree of regularity (or last fall degree) of Weil descent systems coming from summation polynomials to solve the elliptic curve discrete logarithm problem might depend on $n$, since such systems without field equations are not zero-dimensional.
  • We study the computational complexity of Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods for high-dimensional Bayesian linear regression under sparsity constraints. We first show that a Bayesian approach can achieve variable-selection consistency under relatively mild conditions on the design matrix. We then demonstrate that the statistical criterion of posterior concentration need not imply the computational desideratum of rapid mixing of the MCMC algorithm. By introducing a truncated sparsity prior for variable selection, we provide a set of conditions that guarantee both variable-selection consistency and rapid mixing of a particular Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. The mixing time is linear in the number of covariates up to a logarithmic factor. Our proof controls the spectral gap of the Markov chain by constructing a canonical path ensemble that is inspired by the steps taken by greedy algorithms for variable selection.
  • In this paper we establish a closing property and a hyperbolic closing property for thin trapped chain hyperbolic homoclinic classes with one dimensional center in partial hyperbolicity setting. Taking advantage of theses properties, we prove that the growth rate of the number of hyperbolic periodic points is equal to the topological entropy. We also obtain that the hyperbolic periodic measures are dense in the space of invariant measures.
  • Minimax $L_2$ risks for high-dimensional nonparametric regression are derived under two sparsity assumptions: (1) the true regression surface is a sparse function that depends only on $d=O(\log n)$ important predictors among a list of $p$ predictors, with $\log p=o(n)$; (2) the true regression surface depends on $O(n)$ predictors but is an additive function where each additive component is sparse but may contain two or more interacting predictors and may have a smoothness level different from other components. For either modeling assumption, a practicable extension of the widely used Bayesian Gaussian process regression method is shown to adaptively attain the optimal minimax rate (up to $\log n$ terms) asymptotically as both $n,p\to\infty$ with $\log p=o(n)$.