• We report a polarized Raman scattering study of non-symmorphic topological insulator KHgSb with hourglass-like electronic dispersion. Supported by theoretical calculations, we show that the lattice of the previously assigned space group $P6_3/mmc$ (No. 194) is unstable in KHgSb. While we observe one of two calculated Raman active E$_{2g}$ phonons of space group $P6_3/mmc$ at room temperature, an additional A$_{1g}$ peak appears at 99.5 ~cm$^{-1}$ upon cooling below $T^*$ = 150 K, which suggests a lattice distortion. Several weak peaks associated with two-phonon excitations emerge with this lattice instability. We also show that the sample is very sensitive to high temperature and high laser power, conditions under which it quickly decomposes, leading to the formation of Sb. Our first-principles calculations indicate that space group $P6_3mc$ (No. 186), corresponding to a vertical displacement of the Sb atoms with respect to the Hg atoms that breaks the inversion symmetry, is lower in energy than the presumed $P6_3/mmc$ structure and preserves the glide plane symmetry necessary to the formation of hourglass fermions.
  • We have investigated the spin texture of surface Fermi arcs in the recently discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The experimental results demonstrate that the Fermi arcs are spin-polarized. The measured spin texture fulfills the requirement of mirror and time reversal symmetries and is well reproduced by our first-principles calculations, which gives strong evidence for the topologically nontrivial Weyl semimetal state in TaAs. The consistency between the experimental and calculated results further confirms the distribution of chirality of the Weyl nodes determined by first-principles calculations.
  • We report a polarized Raman study of Weyl semimetal TaAs. We observe all the optical phonons, with energies and symmetries consistent with our first-principles calculations. We detect additional excitations assigned to multiple-phonon excitations. These excitations are accompanied by broad peaks separated by 140~cm$^{-1}$ that are also most likely associated with multiple-phonon excitations. We also noticed a sizable B$_1$ component for the spectral background, for which the origin remains unclear.