• We present a wide dataset of gamma-ray, X-ray, UVOIR, and radio observations of the Swift GRB100814A. At the end of the slow decline phase of the X-ray and optical afterglow, this burst shows a sudden and prominent rebrightening in the optical band only, followed by a fast decay in both bands. The optical rebrightening also shows chromatic evolution. Such a puzzling behaviour cannot be explained by a single component model. We discuss other possible interpretations, and we find that a model that incorporates a long-lived reverse shock and forward shock fits the temporal and spectral properties of GRB100814A the best.
  • We present the gamma-ray, X-ray, optical and radio data for GRB100814A. At the end of the slow decline phase of the X-ray and optical afterglow, a sudden and prominent rebrightening in the optical band occurs followed by a fast decay in both bands. This optical rebrightening is accompanied by possible chromatic variations. We discuss possible interpretations, such as double component scenarios and internal dissipation mechanism, with their virtues and drawbacks. We also compare GRB100814A with other Swift bursts that show optical rebrightenings with similar properties.
  • Hundreds of gamma-ray burst (GRB) UV-optical light curves have been measured since the discovery of optical afterglows, however, even after nearly 5 years of operation of the SWIFT observatory, only a handful of measurements have been made soon (within a minute) after the gamma ray signal. This lack of early observations fails to address burst physics at the short time scales associated with burst events and progenitors. Because of this lack of sub-minute data, the characteristics of the UV-optical light curve of short-hard type GRB and rapid-rising GRB, which may account for ~30% of all GRB, remain practically unknown. We have developed methods for reaching the sub-minute and the sub-second timescales in a small spacecraft observatory appropriate for launch on a microsatellite. Rather than slewing the entire spacecraft to aim the UV-optical instrument at the GRB position, we use rapidly moving mirrors to redirect our optical beam. Our collaboration has produced a unique MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) micromirror array which can point and settle on target in only 1 ms. This technology is proven, flying successfully as the MTEL (MEMS Telescope for Extreme Lightning) on the Tatiana-2 Spacecraft in September 2009 and as the KAMTEL on the International Space Station in April 2008. The sub-minute measurements of the UV-optical emission of dozens of GRB each year will result in a more rigorous test of current internal shock models, probe the extremes of bulk Lorentz factors, and provide the first early and detailed measurements of fast-rise and short type GRB UV-optical light curves.
  • Relativistic blast waves can be described by a mechanical model. In this model, the "blast" -- the compressed gas between the forward and reverse shocks -- is viewed as one hot body. Equations governing its dynamics are derived from conservation of mass, energy, and momentum. Simple analytical solutions are obtained in the two limiting cases of ultra-relativistic and non-relativistic reverse shock. Equations are derived for the general explosion problem.