• Context. The surface structures and dynamics of cool stars are characterized by the presence of convective motions and turbulent flows which shape the emergent spectrum. Aims. We used realistic three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamical simulations from the Stagger-grid to calculate synthetic spectra with the radiative transfer code Optim3D for stars with different stellar parameters to predict photometric colors and convective velocity shifts. Methods. We calculated spectra from 1000 to 200 000 A with a constant resolving power of 20 000 and from 8470 and 8710 A (Gaia Radial Velocity Spectrometer - RVS - spectral range), with a constant resolving power of 300 000. Results. We used synthetic spectra to compute theoretical colors in the Johnson-Cousins UBV(RI), SDSS, 2MASS, Gaia, SkyMapper, Stromgren systems, and HST-WFC3. We showed that 1D versus 3D differences are limited to a small percent except for the narrow filters that span the optical and UV region of the spectrum. In addition, we derived the effect of the convective velocity fields on selected Fe I lines. We found the overall convective shift for 3D simulations with respect to the reference 1D hydrostatic models, revealing line shifts of between -0.235 and +0.361 km/s. We showed a net correlation of the convective shifts with the effective temperature: lower effective temperatures denote redshifts and higher effective temperatures denote blueshifts. We conclude that the extraction of accurate radial velocities from RVS spectra need an appropriate wavelength correction from convection shifts. Conclusions. The use of realistic 3D hydrodynamical stellar atmosphere simulations has a small but significant impact on the predicted photometry compared with classical 1D hydrostatic models for late-type stars. We make all the spectra publicly available for the community through the POLLUX database.
  • Context. Red giant branch (RGB) stars are very bright objects in galaxies and are often used as standard candles. Interferometry is the ideal tool to characterize the dynamics and morphology of their atmospheres. Aims. We aim at precisely characterising the surface dynamics of a sample of RGB stars. Methods. We obtained interferometric observations for three RGB stars with the MIRC instrument mounted at the CHARA interfer- ometer. We looked for asymmetries on the stellar surfaces using limb-darkening models. Results. We measured the apparent diameters of HD197989 (Epsilon Cyg) = 4.61+-0.02 mas, HD189276 (HR7633) = 2.95+-0.01 mas, and HD161096 (Beta Oph) = 4.43+-0.01 mas. We detected departures from the centrosymmetric case for all three stars with the tendency of a greater effect for lower logg of the sample. We explored the causes of this signal and conclude that a possible explanation to the interferometric signal is the convection-related and/or the magnetic-related surface activity. However, it is necessary to monitor these stars with new observations, possibly coupled with spectroscopy, in order to firmly establish the cause.
  • Stellar activity and convection-related surface structures might cause bias in planet detection and characterization that use these transits. Surface convection simulations help to quantify the granulation signal. We used realistic three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamical simulations from the Stagger grid and synthetic images computed with the radiative transfer code Optim3D to model the transits of three prototype planets: a hot Jupiter, a hot Neptune, and a terrestrial planet. We computed intensity maps from RHD simulations of the Sun and a K-dwarf star at different wavelength bands from optical to far-infrared. We modeled the transit using synthetic stellar-disk images and emulated the temporal variation of the granulation intensity. We identified two types of granulation noise that act simultaneously during the planet transit: (i) the intrinsic change in the granulation pattern with timescales smaller than the usual planet transit, and (ii) the fact that the transiting planet occults isolated regions of the photosphere that differ in local surface brightness. Our modeling approach shows that the granulation pattern has a non-negligible effect on the light curve depth during the transit, and, consequentially on the determination of the radius of the planet transiting. The granulation noise appears to be correlated among the different wavelength ranges either in the visible or in the infrared regions. The granulation has to be considered as an intrinsic uncertainty (as a result of stellar variability) on the precise measurements of exoplanet transits of planets. The full characterization of the granulation is essential for determining the degree of uncertainty on the planet parameters. In this context, the use of 3D RHD simulations is important to measure the convection-related fluctuations.
  • Stellar activity and, in particular, convection-related surface structures, potentially cause fluctuations that can affect the transit light curves. Surface convection simulations can help the interpretation of ToV. We used realistic three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamical simulation of the Sun from the Stagger-grid and synthetic images computed with the radiative transfer code Optim3D to provide predictions for the transit of Venus in 2004 observed by the satellite ACRIMSAT. We computed intensity maps from RHD simulation of the Sun and produced synthetic stellar disk image. We computed the light curve and compared it to the ACRIMSAT observations and also to the light curves obtained with solar surface representations carried out using radial profiles with different limb-darkening laws. We also applied the same spherical tile imaging method to the observations of center-to-limb Sun granulation with HINODE. We managed to explain ACRIMSAT observations of 2004 ToV and showed that the granulation pattern causes fluctuations in the transit light curve. We evaluated the contribution of the granulation to the ToV. We showed that the granulation pattern can partially explain the observed discrepancies between models and data. This confirms that the limb-darkening and the granulation pattern simulated in 3D RHD Sun represent well what is imaged by HINODE. In the end, we found that the Venus's aureole contribution during ToV is less intense than the solar photosphere, and thus negligible. Being able to explain consistently the data of 2004 ToV is a new step forward for 3D RHD simulations that are becoming essential for the detection and characterization of exoplanets. They show that the granulation have to be considered as an intrinsic incertitude, due to the stellar variability, on precise measurements of exoplanet transits of, most likely, planets with small diameters.
  • The element abundance ratios of four low-mass stars with extremely low metallicities indicate that the gas out of which the stars formed was enriched in each case by at most a few, and potentially only one low-energy, supernova. Such supernovae yield large quantities of light elements such as carbon but very little iron. The dominance of low-energy supernovae is surprising, because it has been expected that the first stars were extremely massive, and that they disintegrated in pair-instability explosions that would rapidly enrich galaxies in iron. What has remained unclear is the yield of iron from the first supernovae, because hitherto no star is unambiguously interpreted as encapsulating the yield of a single supernova. Here we report the optical spectrum of SMSS J031300.36- 670839.3, which shows no evidence of iron (with an upper limit of 10^-7.1 times solar abundance). Based on a comparison of its abundance pattern with those of models, we conclude that the star was seeded with material from a single supernova with an original mass of ~60 Mo (and that the supernova left behind a black hole). Taken together with the previously mentioned low-metallicity stars, we conclude that low-energy supernovae were common in the early Universe, and that such supernovae yield light element enrichment with insignificant iron. Reduced stellar feedback both chemically and mechanically from low-energy supernovae would have enabled first-generation stars to form over an extended period. We speculate that such stars may perhaps have had an important role in the epoch of cosmic reionization and the chemical evolution of early galaxies.
  • We present the Stagger-grid, a comprehensive grid of time-dependent, 3D hydrodynamic model atmospheres for late-type stars with realistic treatment of radiative transfer, covering a wide range in stellar parameters. This grid of 3D models is intended for various applications like stellar spectroscopy, asteroseismology and the study of stellar convection. In this introductory paper, we describe the methods used for the computation of the grid and discuss the general properties of the 3D models as well as their temporal and spatial averages (<3D>). All our models were generated with the Stagger-code, using realistic input physics for the equation of state (EOS) and for continuous and line opacities. Our ~220 grid models range in Teff from 4000 to 7000K in steps of 500K, in log g from 1.5 to 5.0 in steps of 0.5 dex, and [Fe/H] from -4.0 to +0.5 in steps of 0.5 and 1.0 dex. We find a tight scaling relation between the vertical velocity and the surface entropy jump, which itself correlates with the constant entropy value of the adiabatic convection zone. The range in intensity contrast is enhanced at lower metallicity. The granule size correlates closely with the pressure scale height sampled at the depth of maximum velocity. We compare the <3D> models with widely applied 1D models, as well as with theoretical 1D hydrostatic models generated with the same EOS and opacity tables as the 3D models, in order to isolate the effects of using self-consistent and hydrodynamic modeling of convection, rather than the classical mixing length theory approach. For the first time, we are able to quantify systematically over a broad range of stellar parameters the uncertainties of 1D models arising from the simplified treatment of physics, in particular convective energy transport. In agreement with previous findings, we find that the differences can be significant, especially for metal-poor stars.
  • We used a new realistic 3D radiative-hydrodynamical model atmosphere of Procyon generated with the Stagger Code and synthetic spectra computed with the radiative transfer code Optim3D to re-analyze interferometric and spectroscopic data from the optical to the infrared of Procyon. We compute intensity maps in two optical filters centered at 500 and 800 nm (MARK III) and one infrared filter centered at 2200 nm (VINCI). We constructed stellar disk images accounting for the center-to-limb variations and used them to derive visibility amplitudes and closure phases. We provide 3D limb-darkening coefficients in the optical as well as in the infrared. We show that visibility curves and closure phases show clear deviations from circular symmetry from the 3rd lobe on. These deviations are detectable with current interferometers using closure phases. We derive new angular diameters at different wavelengths with two independent methods based on 3D simulations. We find a diameter_Vinci = 5.390 \pm 0.03 mas that this is confirmed by an independent asteroseismic estimation. The resulting Teff is 6591 K, which is consistent with the infrared flux method determinations. We find also a value of the surface gravity log g = 4.01 \pm 0.03 that is larger by 0.05 dex from literature values. Spectrophotometric comparisons with observations provide very good agreement with the spectral energy distribution and photometric colors, allowing us to conclude that the thermal gradient of the simulation matches fairly well Procyon. Finally, we show that the granulation pattern of a planet hosting Procyon-like star has a non-negligible impact on the detection of hot Jupiters in the infrared using interferometry closure phases. It is then crucial to have a comprehensive knowledge of the host star to directly detect and characterize hot Jupiters. In this respect, RHD simulations are very important to reach this aim.
  • Convection plays an essential role in the emerging intensity for many stars that will be observed by Gaia. Convective-related surface structures affect the shape, shift, and asymmetry of absorption lines, the phocentric and photometric variability causing bias in Gaia measurements. Regarding the importance of Gaia mission and its goals, it is mandatory to have the best models of the observed stars. 3D time-dependent hydrodynamical simulations of surface convection are crucial to model the photosphere of late type stars in a very realistic way. These simulations are an important tool to correct the radial velocities and better estimates the parallaxes and photometric variability.