• We discuss a Tsallis distribution with complex nonextensivity parameter $q$. In this case the usual distribution is decorated with a log-periodic oscillating factor (apparently, such oscillations can bee seen in recently measured transverse momentum distributions in collisions at very high energies). Complex $q$ also means complex heat capacity which shall also be briefly discussed.
  • N.Abgrall, O.Andreeva, A.Aduszkiewicz, Y.Ali, T.Anticic, N.Antoniou, B.Baatar, F.Bay, A.Blondel, J.Blumer, M.Bogomilov, M.Bogusz, A.Bravar, J.Brzychczyk, S.A.Bunyatov, P.Christakoglou, T.Czopowicz, N.Davis, S.Debieux, H.Dembinski, F.Diakonos, S.DiLuise, W.Dominik, T.Drozhzhova, J.Dumarchez, K.Dynowski, R.Engel, I.Efthymiopoulos, A.Ereditato, A.Fabich, G.A.Feofilov, Z.Fodor, A.Fulop, M.Gazdzicki, M.Golubeva, K.Grebieszkow, A.Grzeszczuk, F.Guber, A.Haesler, T.Hasegawa, M.Hierholzer, R.Idczak, S.Igolkin, A.Ivashkin, D.Jokovic, K.Kadija, A.Kapoyannis, E.Kaptur, D.Kielczewska, M.Kirejczyk, J.Kisiel, T.Kiss, S.Kleinfelder, T.Kobayashi, V.I.Kolesnikov, D.Kolev, V.P.Kondratiev, A.Korzenev, P.Koversarski, S.Kowalski, A.Krasnoperov, A.Kurepin, D.Larsen, A.Laszlo, V.V.Lyubushkin, M.Mackowiak-Pawlowska, Z.Majka, B.Maksiak, A.I.Malakhov, D.Maletic, D.Manglunki, D.Manic, A.Marchionni, A.Marcinek, V.Marin, K.Marton, H.-J.Mathes, T.Matulewicz, V.Matveev, G.L.Melkumov, M.Messina, St.Mrowczynski, S.Murphy, T.Nakadaira, M.Nirkko, K.Nishikawa, T.Palczewski, G.Palla, A.D.Panagiotou, T.Paul, W.Peryt, O.Petukhov, C.Pistillo, R.Planeta, J.Pluta, B.A.Popov, M.Posiadala, S.Pulawski, J.Puzovic, W.Rauch, M.Ravonel, A.Redij, R.Renfordt, E.Richter-Was, A.Robert, D.Rohrich, E.Rondio, B.Rossi, M.Roth, A.Rubbia, A.Rustamov, M.Rybczynski, A.Sadovsky, K.Sakashita, M.Savic, K.Schmidt, T.Sekiguchi, P.Seyboth, D.Sgalaberna, M.Shibata, R.Sipos, E.Skrzypczak, M.Slodkowski, Z.Sosin, P.Staszel, G.Stefanek, J.Stepaniak, H.Stroebele, T.Susa, M.Szuba, M.Tada, V.Tereshchenko, T.Tolyhi, R.Tsenov, L.Turko, R.Ulrich, M.Unger, M.Vassiliou, D.Veberic, V.V.Vechernin, G.Vesztergombi, L.Vinogradov, A.Wilczek, Z.Wlodarczyk, A.Wojtaszek-Szwarz, O.Wyszynski, L.Zambelli, W.Zipper
    Jan. 19, 2014 nucl-ex, physics.ins-det
    NA61/SHINE (SPS Heavy Ion and Neutrino Experiment) is a multi-purpose experimental facility to study hadron production in hadron-proton, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. It recorded the first physics data with hadron beams in 2009 and with ion beams (secondary 7Be beams) in 2011. NA61/SHINE has greatly profited from the long development of the CERN proton and ion sources and the accelerator chain as well as the H2 beamline of the CERN North Area. The latter has recently been modified to also serve as a fragment separator as needed to produce the Be beams for NA61/SHINE. Numerous components of the NA61/SHINE set-up were inherited from its predecessors, in particular, the last one, the NA49 experiment. Important new detectors and upgrades of the legacy equipment were introduced by the NA61/SHINE Collaboration. This paper describes the state of the NA61/SHINE facility - the beams and the detector system - before the CERN Long Shutdown I, which started in March 2013.
  • Notwithstanding the visible maturity of the subject of Bose-Einstein Correlations (BEC), as witnessed nowadays, we would like to bring to ones attention two points, which apparently did not received attention they deserve: the problem of the choice of the form of $C_2(Q)$ correlation function when effects of partial coherence of the hadronizing source are to be included and the feasibility to model effects of Bose-Einstein statistics, in particular the BEC, by direct numerical simulations.
  • We demonstrate that selection of the minimal value of ordered variables leads in a natural way to its distribution being given by the Tsallis distribution, the same as that resulting from Tsallis nonextensive statistics. The possible application of this result to the multiparticle production processes is indicated.
  • We propose a novel numerical method of modelling Bose-Einstein correlations (BEC) observed among identical (bosonic) particles produced in multiparticle production reactions. We argue that the most natural approach is to work directly in the momentum space in which the Bose statistics of secondaries reveals itself in their tendency to bunch in a specific way in the available phase space. Because such procedure is essentially identical to the clan model of multiparticle distributions proposed some time ago, therefore we call it the Quantum Clan Model.
  • We look at multiparticle production processes from the Information Theory point of view, both in its extensive and nonextensive versions. Examples of both symmetric (like pp or AA) and asymmetric (like pA) collisions are considered showing that some ways of description of experimental data used in the literature are of more general validity than usually anticipated.}
  • We describe an attempt to numerically model Bose-Einstein correlations (BEC) from "within", i.e., by using them as the most fundamental ingredient of a Monte Carlo event generator (MC) rather than considering them as a kind of (more or less important, depending on the actual situation) "afterburner", which inevitably changes the original physical content of the MC code used to model multiparticle production process.
  • The extended Gaussian ensemble introduced recently as a generalization of the canonical ensemble, which allows to treat energy fluctuations present in the system, is used to analyze the inelasticity distributions in high energy multiparticle production processes.
  • We propose extension of the numerical method to model effect of Bose-Einstein correlations (BEC) observed in hadronization processes which allows for calculations not only correlation functions $C_2(Q_{inv})$ (one-dimensional) but also corresponding to them $C_2(Q_{x,y,z})$ (i.e., three-dimensional). The method is based on the bunching of identical bosonic particles in elementary emitting cells (EEC) in phase space in manner leading to proper Bose-Einstein form of distribution of energy (this was enough to calculate $C_2(Q_{inv})$). To obtain also $C_2(Q_{x,y,z})$ one has to add to it also symmetrization of the multiparticle wave function to properly correlate space-time locations of produced particles with their energy-momentum characteristics.
  • We review hitherto attempts to look at the multiparticle production processes from the Information Theory point of view (both in its extensive and nonextensive versions).
  • We describe an attempt to model numerically Bose-Einstein correlations (BEC) from "within", i.e., by using them as the most fundamental ingredient of some Monte Carlo event generator (MC) rather than considering them as a kind of (more or less important, depending on the actual situation) "afterburner", which inevitably changes original physical content of the MC code used to model multiparticle production process.
  • Numerical modelling of quantum effects caused by bosonic or fermionic character of secondaries produced in high energy collisions of different sorts is at the moment still far from being established. In what follows we propose novel numerical method of modelling Bose-Einstein correlations (BEC) observed among identical (bosonic) particles produced in such reactions. We argue that the most natural approach is to work directly in the momentum space of produced secondaries in which the Bose statistics reveals itself in their tendency to bunch in a specific way in the available phase space. Fermionic particles can also be treated in similar fashion.
  • We look at multiparticle production processes from the nonextensive point of view. Nonextensivity means here the systematic deviations in exponential formulas provided by the usual statistical approach for description of some observables like transverse momenta or rapidity distributions. We show that they can be accounted for by means of single parameter q with |q-1| being the measure of nonextensivity. The whole discussion will be based on the information theoretical approach to multiparticle processes proposed by us some time ago.
  • We propose novel numerical method of modelling Bose-Einstein correlations (BEC) observed among identical (bosonic) particles produced in multiparticle production reactions. We argue that the most natural approach is to work directly in the momentum space in which Bose statistics of secondaries reveals itself in their tendency to bunch in a specific way in the available phase space. Because such procedure is essentially identical to the clan model of multiparticle distributions proposed some time ago, therefore we call it the Quantum Clan Model.
  • The showers of cosmic rays entering the Earth's atmosphere are main sources of information on cosmic rays and are also believed to provide information on elementary interactions at energies not accessible to accelerators. In this context we would like first to remind the role of inelasticity K and elementary cross section $\sigma$ and then argue that similar in importance are fluctuations of different observables. The later will be illustrated by multiplicity fluctuations in hadronic and nuclear collisions.
  • The application of information theory approach (both in its extensive and nonextensive versions) to high energy multiparticle processes is discussed and confronted with experimental data on e+e- annihilation processes, pp and \bar{p}p scatterings and heavy ion collisions.
  • We argue that recent data on fluctuations observed in heavy ion collisions show non-monotonic behaviour as function of number of participants (or "wounded nucleons") N_W. When interpreted in thermodynamical approach this result can be associated with a possible structure occuring in the corresponding equation of state (EoS). This in turn could be further interpreted as due to the occurence of some characteristic points (like "softest point" or "critical point") of EoS discussed in the literature and therefore be regarded as a possible signal of the QGP formation in such collisions. We show, however, that the actual situation is still far from being clear and calls for more investigations of fluctuation phenomena in multiparticle production processes to be performed.
  • The new method of numerical modelling of Bose-Einstein correlations observed in all kinds of multiparticle production processes is proposed.
  • It is demonstrated how to obtain the least biased description of the single particle spectra measured in all multiparticle production processes by using information theory approach (known also as MaxEnt approach). The case of e+e- annihilation in hadrons process is discussed in more detail as an example. Comparison between MaxEnt approach and simple dynamical model based on the cascade process is presented as well.
  • We present an overview of information theory approach (both in its extensive and nonextensive versions) applied to high energy multiparticle production processes. It will be illustrated by analysis of single particle distributions measured in proton-proton, proton-antiproton and nuclear collisions. We shall demonstrate the particular role played by the nonextensivity parameter q in such analysis as summarizing our knowledge on the fluctuations existed in hadronizing system.
  • Nature is full of random networks of complex topology describing such apparently disparate systems as biological, economical or informatical ones. Their most characteristic feature is the apparent scale-free character of interconnections between nodes. Using an information theory approach, we show that maximalization of information entropy leads to a wide spectrum of possible types of distributions including, in the case of nonextensive information entropy, the power-like scale-free distributions characteristic of complex systems.
  • Using the information theory approach, in both its extensive and nonextensive versions, we estimate the inelasticity parameter $K$ of hadronic reactions together with its distribution and energy dependence from $p\bar{p}$ and $pp$ data. We find that the inelasticity remains essentially constant in energy except for a variation around $K\sim 0.5$, as was originally expected.
  • The limitations of the recently proposed new method of numerical modelling of Bose-Einstein correlations (BEC) are explicitly demonstrated. It is then argued that BEC should still be considered as emerging from the correlations of fluctuations, however they have to be modelled first in any Monte Carlo event generator (MCEG) and not added {\it a posteriori} to the existing output of some MCEG.
  • The apparently observed power-like abundance of elements in Universe is discussed in more detail with special emphasis put on the strangelets.
  • We present a short review of traces of nonextensivity in particle physics due to fluctuations.