• Recent research has shown a substantial active presence of bots in online social networks (OSNs). In this paper we utilise our past work on studying bots (Stweeler) to comparatively analyse the usage and impact of bots and humans on Twitter, one of the largest OSNs in the world. We collect a large-scale Twitter dataset and define various metrics based on tweet metadata. We divide and filter the dataset in four popularity groups in terms of number of followers. Using a human annotation task we assign 'bot' and 'human' ground-truth labels to the dataset, and compare the annotations against an online bot detection tool for evaluation. We then ask a series of questions to discern important behavioural bot and human characteristics using metrics within and among four popularity groups. From the comparative analysis we draw important differences as well as surprising similarities between the two entities, thus paving the way for reliable classification of automated political infiltration, advertisement campaigns, and general bot detection.
  • The success of Wi-Fi technology as an efficient and low-cost last-mile access solution has enabled massive spontaneous deployments generating storms of beacons all across the globe. Emerging location systems are using these beacons to observe mobility patterns of people through portable or wearable devices and offers promising use-cases that can help to solve critical problems in the developing world. In this paper, we design and develop a novel prototype to organise these spontaneous deployments of Access Points into what we call virtual cells (vcells). We compute virtual cells from a list of Access Points collected from different active scans for a geographical region. We argue that virtual cells can be encoded using Bloom filters to implement the location process. Lastly, we present two illustrative use-cases to showcase the suitability and challenges of the technique.