• Nematic fluctuations occur in a wide range of physical systems from liquid crystals to biological molecules to solids such as exotic magnets, cuprates and iron-based high-$T_c$ superconductors. Nematic fluctuations are thought to be closely linked to the formation of Cooper-pairs in iron-based superconductors. It is unclear whether the anisotropy inherent in this nematicity arises from electronic spin or orbital degrees of freedom. We have studied the iron-based Mott insulators La$_{2}$O$_{2}$Fe$_{2}$O$M$$_{2}$ $M$ = (S, Se) which are structurally similar to the iron pnictide superconductors. They are also in close electronic phase diagram proximity to the iron pnictides. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) revealed a critical slowing down of nematic fluctuations as observed by the spin-lattice relaxation rate ($1/T_1$). This is complemented by the observation of a change of electrical field gradient over a similar temperature range using M\"ossbauer spectroscopy. The neutron pair distribution function technique applied to the nuclear structure reveals the presence of local nematic $C_2$ fluctuations over a wide temperature range while neutron diffraction indicates that global $C_{4}$ symmetry is preserved. Theoretical modeling of a geometrically frustrated spin-$1$ Heisenberg model with biquadratic and single-ion anisotropic terms provides the interpretation of magnetic fluctuations in terms of hidden quadrupolar spin fluctuations. Nematicity is closely linked to geometrically frustrated magnetism, which emerges from orbital selectivity. The results highlight orbital order and spin fluctuations in the emergence of nematicity in Fe-based oxychalcogenides. The detection of nematic fluctuation within these Mott insulator expands the group of iron-based materials that show short-range symmetry-breaking.
  • Iron-based superconductivity develops near an antiferromagnetic order and out of a bad metal normal state, which has been interpreted as originating from a proximate Mott transition. Whether an actual Mott insulator can be realized in the phase diagram of the iron pnictides remains an open question. Here we use transport, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and neutron scattering to demonstrate that NaFe$_{1-x}$Cu$_x$As near $x\approx 0.5$ exhibits real space Fe and Cu ordering, and are antiferromagnetic insulators with the insulating behavior persisting above the N\'eel temperature, indicative of a Mott insulator. Upon decreasing $x$ from $0.5$, the antiferromagnetic ordered moment continuously decreases, yielding to superconductivity around $x=0.05$. Our discovery of a Mott insulating state in NaFe$_{1-x}$Cu$_x$As thus makes it the only known Fe-based material in which superconductivity can be smoothly connected to the Mott insulating state, highlighting the important role of electron correlations in the high-$T_{\rm c}$ superconductivity.
  • When magnons and phonons, the fundamental quasiparticles of the solid, are coupled to one another, they form a new hybrid quasi-particle, leading to novel phenomena and interesting applications. Despite its wide-ranging importance, however, detailed experimental studies on the underlying Hamiltonian is rare for actual materials. Moreover, the anharmonicity of such magnetoelastic excitations remains largely unexplored although it is essential for a proper understanding of their diverse thermodynamic behaviour as well as intrinsic zero-temperature decay. Here we show that in noncollinear antiferromagnets, a strong magnon-phonon coupling can significantly enhance the anharmonicity, resulting in the creation of magnetoelastic excitations and their spontaneous decay. By measuring the spin waves over the full Brillouin zone and carrying out anharmonic spin wave calculations using a Hamiltonian with an explicit magnon-phonon coupling, we have identified a hybrid magnetoelastic mode in (Y,Lu)MnO3 and quantified its decay rate and the exchange-striction coupling term required to produce it. Our work has wide implications for understanding of the spin-phonon coupling and the resulting excitations of the broad classes of noncollinear magnets.
  • Neutron scattering from high-quality YBa2Cu3O6.33 (YBCO6.33) single crystals with a Tc of 8.4 K shows no evidence of a coexistence of superconductivity with long-range antiferromagnetic order at this very low, near-critical doping of p~0.055. However, we find short-range three dimensional spin correlations that develop at temperatures much higher than Tc. Their intensity increases smoothly on cooling and shows no anomaly that might signify a Neel transition. The system remains subcritical with spins correlated over only one and a half unit cells normal to the planes. At low energies the short-range spin response is static on the microvolt scale. The excitations out of this ground state give rise to an overdamped spectrum with a relaxation rate of 3 meV. The transition to the superconducting state below Tc has no effect on the spin correlations. The elastic interplanar spin response extends over a length that grows weakly but fails to diverge as doping is moved towards the superconducting critical point. Any antiferromagnetic critical point likely lies outside the superconducting dome. The observations suggest that conversion from Neel long-range order to a spin glass texture is a prerequisite to formation of paired superconducting charges. We show that while pc =0.052 is a critical doping for superconducting pairing, it is not for spin order.
  • Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano- or mesoscopic structures in the plasma membrane and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as signal transduction, adhesion, trafficking and lipid/protein sorting. Observations of these membrane heterogeneities have proven challenging, as they are thought to be both small and short-lived. With a combination of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and neutron diffraction using deuterium labeled cholesterol molecules we observe raft-like structures and determine the ordering of the cholesterol molecules in binary cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. From coarse-grained computer simulations, heterogenous membranes structures were observed and characterized as small, ordered domains. Neutron diffraction was used to study the lateral structure of the cholesterol molecules. We find pairs of strongly bound cholesterol molecules in the liquid-disordered phase, in accordance with the umbrella model. Bragg peaks corresponding to ordering of the cholesterol molecules in the raft-like structures were observed and indexed by two different structures: a monoclinic structure of ordered cholesterol pairs of alternating direction in equilibrium with cholesterol plaques, i.e., triclinic cholesterol bilayers.
  • We use inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy to study the magnetic excitations spectra throughout the Brioullion zone in electron-doped iron pnictide superconductors BaFe$_{2-x}$Ni$_{x}$As$_{2}$ with $x=0.096,0.15,0.18$. While the $x=0.096$ sample is near optimal superconductivity with $T_c=20$ K and has coexisting static incommensurate magnetic order, the $x=0.15,0.18$ samples are electron-overdoped with reduced $T_c$ of 14 K and 8 K, respectively, and have no static antiferromagnetic (AF) order. In previous INS work on undoped ($x=0$) and electron optimally doped ($x=0.1$) samples, the effect of electron-doping was found to modify spin waves in the parent compound BaFe$_2$As$_2$ below $\sim$100 meV and induce a neutron spin resonance at the commensurate AF ordering wave vector that couples with superconductivity. While the new data collected on the $x=0.096$ sample confirms the overall features of the earlier work, our careful temperature dependent study of the resonance reveals that the resonance suddenly changes its $Q$-width below $T_c$ similar to that of the optimally hole-doped iron pnictides Ba$_{0.67}$K$_{0.33}$Fe$_2$As$_2$. In addition, we establish the dispersion of the resonance and find it to change from commensurate to transversely incommensurate with increasing energy. Upon further electron-doping to overdoped iron pnictides with $x=0.15$ and 0.18, the resonance becomes weaker and transversely incommensurate at all energies, while spin excitations above $\sim$100 meV are still not much affected. Our absolute spin excitation intensity measurements throughout the Brillouin zone for $x=0.096,0.15,0.18$ confirm the notion that the low-energy spin excitation coupling with itinerant electron is important for superconductivity in these materials, even though the high-energy spin excitations are weakly doping dependent.
  • We report detailed inelastic neutron scattering measurements on single crystals of the frustrated two-leg ladder BiCu2PO6, whose ground state is described as a spin liquid phase with no long-range order down to 6 K. Two branches of steeply dispersing long-lived spin excitations are observed with excitation gaps of \Delta_1 = 1.90(9) meV and \Delta_2 = 3.95(8) meV. Significant frustrating next-nearest neighbour interactions along the ladder leg drive the minimum of each excitation branch to incommensurate wavevectors \zeta_1 = 0.574\pi and \zeta_2 = 0.553\pi for the lower and upper energy branches respectively. The temperature dependence of the excitation spectrum near the gap energy is consistent with thermal activation into singly and doubly degenerate excited states. The observed magnetic excitation spectrum as well as earlier thermodynamic data could be consistently explained by the presence of strong anisotropic interactions in the ground state Hamiltonian.
  • We use inelastic neutron scattering to systematically investigate the Ni-doping evolution of the low-energy spin excitations in BaFe2-xNixAs2 spanning from underdoped antiferromagnet to overdoped superconductor (0.03< x < 0.18). In the undoped state, the low-energy (<80 meV) spin waves of BaFe2As2 form transversely elongated ellipses in the [H, K] plane of the reciprocal space. Upon Ni-doping, the c-axis magnetic exchange coupling is rapidly suppressed and the momentum distribution of spin excitations in the [H, K] plane is enlarged in both the transverse and longitudinal directions with respect to the in-plane AF ordering wave vector of the parent compound. As a function of increasing Ni-doping x, the spin excitation widths increase linearly but with a larger rate along the transverse direction. These results are in general agreement with calculations of dynamic susceptibility based on the random phase approximation (RPA) in an itinerant electron picture. For samples near optimal superconductivity at x= 0.1, a neutron spin resonance appears in the superconducting state. Upon further increasing the electron-doping to decrease the superconducting transition temperature Tc, the intensity of the low-energy magnetic scattering decreases and vanishes concurrently with vanishing superconductivity in the overdoped side of the superconducting dome. Comparing with the low-energy spin excitations centered at commensurate AF positions for underdoped and optimally doped materials (x<0.1), spin excitations in the over-doped side (x=0.15) form transversely incommensurate spin excitations, consistent with the RPA calculation. Therefore, the itinerant electron approach provides a reasonable description to the low-energy AF spin excitations in BaFe2-xNixAs2.
  • Co3V2O8 is an orthorhombic magnet in which S=3/2 magnetic moments reside on two crystallographically inequivalent Co2+ sites, which decorate a stacked, buckled version of the two dimensional kagome lattice, the stacked kagome staircase. The magnetic interactions between the Co2+ moments in this structure lead to a complex magnetic phase diagram at low temperature, wherein it exhibits a series of five transitions below 11 K that ultimately culminate in a simple ferromagnetic ground state below T~6.2 K. Here we report magnetization measurements on single and polycrystalline samples of (Co(1-x)Mg(x))3V2O8 for x<0.23, as well as elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements on single crystals of magnetically dilute (Co(1-x)Mg(x))3V2O8 for x=0.029 and x=0.194, in which non-magnetic Mg2+ ions substitute for magnetic Co2+. We find that a dilution of 2.9% leads to a suppression of the ferromagnetic transition temperature by ~15% while a dilution level of 19.4% is sufficient to destroy ferromagnetic long-range order in this material down to a temperature of at least 1.5 K. The magnetic excitation spectrum is characterized by two spin-wave branches in the ordered phase for (Co(1-x)Mg(x))3V2O8 (x=0.029), similar to that of the pure x=0 material, and by broad diffuse scattering at temperatures below 10 K in (Co(1-x)Mg(x))3V2O8 (x=0.194). Such a strong dependence of the transition temperatures to long range order in the presence of quenched non-magnetic impurities is consistent with two-dimensional physics driving the transitions. We further provide a simple percolation model that semi-quantitatively explains the inability of this system to establish long-range magnetic order at the unusually-low dilution levels which we observe in our experiments.
  • Superconductivity in the iron pnictides develops near antiferromagnetism, and the antiferromagnetic (AF) phase appears to overlap with the superconducting phase in some materials such as BaFe2-xTxAs2 (where T = Co or Ni). Here we use neutron scattering to demonstrate that genuine long-range AF order and superconductivity do not coexist in BaFe2-xNixAs2 near optimal superconductivity. In addition, we find a first-order-like AF to superconductivity phase transition with no evidence for a magnetic quantum critical point. Instead, the data reveal that incommensurate short-range AF order coexists and competes with superconductivity, where the AF spin correlation length is comparable to the superconducting coherence length.
  • We use inelastic neutron scattering to study the temperature dependence of the spin excitations of a detwinned superconducting YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{6.45}$ ($T_c=48$ K). In contrast to earlier work on YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{6.5}$ ($T_c=58$ K), where the prominent features in the magnetic spectra consist of a sharp collective magnetic excitation termed ``resonance'' and a large ($\hbar\omega\approx 15$ meV) superconducting spin gap, we find that the spin excitations in YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{6.45}$ are gapless and have a much broader resonance. Our detailed mapping of magnetic scattering along the $a^\ast$/$b^\ast$-axis directions at different energies reveals that spin excitations are unisotropic and consistent with the ``hourglass''-like dispersion along the $a^\ast$-axis direction near the resonance, but they are isotropic at lower energies. Since a fundamental change in the low-temperature normal state of YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{6+y}$ when superconductivity is suppressed takes place at $y\sim0.5$ with a metal-to-insulator crossover (MIC), where the ground state transforms from a metallic to an insulating-like phase, our results suggest a clear connection between the large change in spin excitations and the MIC. The resonance therefore is a fundamental feature of metallic ground state superconductors and a consequence of high-$T_c$ superconductivity.
  • The spin of the neutron allows neutron scattering to reveal the magnetic structure and dynamics of materials over nanometre length scales and picosecond timescales. Neutron scattering is particularly in demand in order to understand high-temperature superconductors, which lie close to magnetically ordered phases, and highly correlated metals with giant effective fermion masses, which lie close to magnetic order or pass through a mysterious phase of hidden order before becoming superconducting. Neutron scattering also is the probe of choice for revealing new phases of matter and new particles, as seen in the surprising behaviour of quantum spin chains and ladders where mass gaps and excited triplons replace conventional spin waves. Examples are given of quantum phenomena where neutron scattering has played a defining role that challenges current understanding of condensed matter.