• We perform an extensive survey of non-standard Higgs decays that are consistent with the 125 GeV Higgs-like resonance. Our aim is to motivate a large set of new experimental analyses on the existing and forthcoming data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The explicit search for exotic Higgs decays presents a largely untapped discovery opportunity for the LHC collaborations, as such decays may be easily missed by other searches. We emphasize that the Higgs is uniquely sensitive to the potential existence of new weakly coupled particles and provide a unified discussion of a large class of both simplified and complete models that give rise to characteristic patterns of exotic Higgs decays. We assess the status of exotic Higgs decays after LHC Run 1. In many cases we are able to set new nontrivial constraints by reinterpreting existing experimental analyses. We point out that improvements are possible with dedicated analyses and perform some preliminary collider studies. We prioritize the analyses according to their theoretical motivation and their experimental feasibility. This document is accompanied by a website that will be continuously updated with further information: http://exotichiggs.physics.sunysb.edu.
  • We present new constraints on sub-GeV dark matter and dark photons from the electron beam-dump experiment E137 conducted at SLAC in 1980-1982. Dark matter interacting with electrons (e.g., via a dark photon) could have been produced in the electron-target collisions and scattered off electrons in the E137 detector, producing the striking, zero-background signature of a high-energy electromagnetic shower that points back to the beam dump. E137 probes new and significant ranges of parameter space, and constrains the well-motivated possibility that invisibly decaying dark photons can explain the $\sim 3.6 \sigma$ discrepancy between the measured and SM value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. It also restricts the parameter space in which the relic density of dark matter in these models is obtained from thermal freeze-out. E137 also convincingly demonstrates that (cosmic) backgrounds can be controlled and thus serves as a powerful proof-of-principle for future beam-dump searches for sub-GeV dark matter scattering off electrons in the detector.
  • We introduce dark mediator Dark matter (dmDM) where the dark and visible sectors are connected by at least one light mediator $\phi$ carrying the same dark charge that stabilizes DM. $\phi$ is coupled to the Standard Model via an operator $\bar q q \phi \phi^*/\Lambda$, and to dark matter via a Yukawa coupling $y_\chi \overline{\chi^c}\chi \phi$. Direct detection is realized as the $2\rightarrow3$ process $\chi N \rightarrow \bar \chi N \phi$ at tree-level for $m_\phi \lesssim 10 \ \mathrm{keV}$ and small Yukawa coupling, or alternatively as a loop-induced $2\rightarrow2$ process $\chi N \rightarrow \chi N$. We explore the direct-detection consequences of this scenario and find that a heavy $\mathcal{O}(100 \ \mathrm{GeV})$ dmDM candidate fakes different $\mathcal{O}(10 \ \mathrm{GeV})$ standard WIMPs in different experiments. Large portions of the dmDM parameter space are detectable above the irreducible neutrino background and not yet excluded by any bounds. Interestingly, for the $m_\phi$ range leading to novel direct detection phenomenology, dmDM is also a form of Self-Interacting Dark Matter (SIDM), which resolves inconsistencies between dwarf galaxy observations and numerical simulations.
  • The Higgs-like signal observed at the LHC could be due to several mass degenerate resonances. We show that the number of resonances is related to the rank of a "production and decay" matrix, $R_{if}$. Each entry in this matrix contains the observed rate in a particular production mode $i$ and final state $f$. In the case of $N$ non-interfering resonances, the rank of $R$ is, at most, $N$. If interference plays a role, the maximum rank is $N^2$ or in the CP limit $N(N+1)/2$. As an illustration we use the present experimental data to constrain the rank of the corresponding matrix. We estimate the LHC reach of probing two and three resonances under various speculations on future measurements and uncertainties.
  • We formulate the necessary conditions for a scalar potential to exhibit spontaneous CP violation. Associated with each complex scalar field is a U(1) symmetry that may be explicitly broken by terms in the scalar potential (called spurions). In order for CP-odd phases in the vacuum to be physical, these phases must be related to spontaneously broken U(1) generators that are also explicitly broken by a sufficient number of inequivalent spurions. In the case where the vacuum is characterized by a single complex phase, our result implies that the phase must be associated with a U(1) generator that is broken explicitly by at least two inequivalent spurions. A suitable generalization of this result to the case of multiple complex phases has also been obtained. These conditions may be used both to distinguish models capable of spontaneous CP violation, and as a model building technique for obtaining spontaneously CP-violating deformations of CP conserving models. As an example, we analyze the generic two Higgs doublet model, where we also carry out a complete spurion analysis. We also comment on other models with spontaneous CP violation, including the chiral Lagrangian, a minimal version of Nelson-Barr model, and little Higgs models with spontaneous CP violation.
  • We explored the coupling of strange quark to the state of mass close to 126 GeV recently observed by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC. An enhanced coupling relative to the expectations for a SM Higgs has the effect of increasing both the inclusive production cross section and the partial decay width into jets. For very large modifications, the latter dominates and the net rate into non-jet decay modes such as diphotons is suppressed, with the result that one can use observations of the diphoton decay mode to place an upper limit on the strange quark coupling. We find that the current observations of the diphoton decay mode imply that the coupling of the new resonance to strange quark can be at most ~ 50 times the SM expectation at the 95 % C.L., if one assumes at most a O(1) modification of the coupling to gluons.
  • Recent indications of a 125 GeV Higgs boson are challenging for gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking (GMSB), since radiative contributions to the Higgs boson mass are not enhanced by significant stop mixing. This challenge should not be considered in isolation, however, as GMSB also generically suffers from two other problems: unsuppressed electric dipole moments and the absence of an attractive dark matter candidate. We show that all of these problems may be simultaneously solved by considering heavy superpartners, without extra fields or modified cosmology. Multi-TeV sfermions suppress the EDMs and raise the Higgs mass, and the dark matter problem is solved by Goldilocks cosmology, in which TeV neutralinos decay to GeV gravitinos that are simultaneously light enough to solve the flavor problem and heavy enough to be all of dark matter. The implications for collider searches and direct and indirect dark matter detection are sobering, but EDMs are expected near their current bounds, and the resulting non-thermal gravitino dark matter is necessarily warm, with testable cosmological implications.
  • We present a model with dark matter in an anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking hidden sector with a U(1)xU(1) gauge symmetry. The symmetries of the model stabilize the dark matter and forbid the introduction of new mass parameters. As a result, the thermal relic density is completely determined by the gravitino mass and dimensionless couplings. Assuming non-hierarchical couplings, the thermal relic density is ~ 0.1, independent of the dark matter's mass and interaction strength, realizing the WIMPless miracle. The model has several striking features. For particle physics, stability of the dark matter is completely consistent with R-parity violation in the visible sector, with implications for superpartner collider signatures; also the thermal relic's mass may be ~ 10 GeV or lighter, which is of interest given recent direct detection results. Interesting astrophysical signatures are dark matter self-interactions through a long-range force, and massless hidden photons and fermions that contribute to the number of relativistic degrees of freedom at BBN and CMB. The latter are particularly interesting, given current indications for extra degrees of freedom and near future results from the Planck observatory.
  • We discuss a new class of low energy supersymmetric models in which the Higgs sector includes a single doublet, for example H_u, but not H_d. Chiral gauge anomalies are canceled against new electroweak-charged states. We discuss the main challenges in building such models, and present several models where these issues are addressed. The resulting phenomenology can be distinguished from that of the MSSM in a number of ways, most notably in physics related to down-type quarks and charged leptons. As a first step toward a chiral Higgs sector, we discuss the scenario of an inert H_d doublet. We show that a UV completion of such model naturally includes dark matter with novel, flavorful couplings to SM quarks.
  • In anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking, superpartners in a hidden sector have masses that are proportional to couplings squared, and so naturally freeze out with the desired dark matter relic density for a large range of masses. We present an extremely simple realization of this possibility, with WIMPless dark matter arising from a hidden sector that is supersymmetric QED with N_F flavors. Dark matter is multi-component, composed of hidden leptons and sleptons with masses anywhere from 10 GeV to 10 TeV, and hidden photons provide the thermal bath. The dark matter self-interacts through hidden sector Coulomb scatterings that are potentially observable. In addition, the hidden photon contribution to the number of relativistic degrees of freedom is in the range \Delta N_eff ~ 0 - 2, and, if the hidden and visible sectors were initially in thermal contact, the model predicts \Delta N_eff ~ 0.2 - 0.4. Data already taken by Planck may provide evidence of such deviations.
  • We propose an efficient method to explore models which which produce like-sign tops at the LHC, using the total charge asymmetry of single lepton events instead of like-sign dileptons. As an example, the method is implemented on a Z' Model, which can explain the top pair forward-backward asymmetry at Tevatron. We show that a large region of the parameter space of this model can be reached using the existing data set at the LHC.
  • Little Higgs models often feature spontaneously broken extra global symmetries, which must also be explicitly broken in order to avoid massless Goldstone modes in the spectrum. We show that a possible conflict with collective symmetry breaking then implies light modes coupled to the Higgs boson, leading to interesting phenomenology. Moreover, spontaneous CP violation is quite generic in such cases, as the explicit breaking may be used to stabilize physical CP odd phases in the vacuum. We demonstrate this in an SU(2) \times SU(2) \times U(1) variant of the Littlest Higgs, as well as in an original SU(6)/SO(6) model. We show that even a very small explicit breaking may lead to large phases, resulting in new sources of CP violation in this class of models.
  • We present a class of warped extra dimensional models whose flavor violating interactions are much suppressed compared to the usual anarchic case due to flavor alignment. Such suppression can be achieved in models where part of the global flavor symmetry is gauged in the bulk and broken in a controlled manner. We show that the bulk masses can be aligned with the down type Yukawa couplings by an appropriate choice of bulk flavon field representations and TeV brane dynamics. This alignment could reduce the flavor violating effects to levels which allow for a Kaluza-Klein scale as low as 2-3 TeV, making the model observable at the LHC. However, the up-type Yukawa couplings on the IR brane, which are bounded from below by recent bounds on CP violation in the D system, induce flavor misalignment radiatively. Off-diagonal down-type Yukawa couplings and kinetic mixings for the down quarks are both consequences of this effect. These radiative Yukawa corrections can be reduced by raising the flavon VEV on the IR brane (at the price of some moderate tuning), or by extending the Higgs sector. The flavor changing effects from the radiatively induced Yukawa mixing terms are at around the current upper experimental bounds. We also show the generic bounds on UV-brane induced flavor violating effects, and comment on possible additional flavor violations from bulk flavor gauge bosons and the bulk Yukawa scalars.
  • We explore how the initial conditions affect the final lepton asymmetry in Soft Leptogenesis. It has been usually assumed that the initial state is a statistical mixture of sterile sneutrinos and anti-sneutrinos with equal abundances. We calculate the lepton asymmetry due to the most general initial mixture. The usually assumed equal mixture produces a small, but sufficient, lepton asymmetry which is proportional to the ratio of the supersymmetry breaking scale over the Majorana scale. A more generic mixture, still with equal contents of sneutrinos and anti sneutrinos, yields an unsuppressed lepton asymmetry. Mixtures of non equal contents of sneutrinos and anti sneutrinos result in a large lepton asymmetry too. While these results establish the robustness of Soft Leptogenesis and other mixing based mechanisms, they also expose their lack of predictive power.
  • The weak phase \gamma can be determined using untagged B^0\to DK_S or B_s\to D\phi, D\eta^{(')} decays. In the past, the small lifetime difference y\equiv \Delta\Gamma/(2\Gamma) has been neglected in B^0, while the CP violating parameter \epsilon\equiv 1-|q/p|^2 has been neglected in both B^0-\bar B^0 and B_s-\bar B_s mixing. We estimate the effect of neglecting y and \epsilon. We find that in D decays to flavor states this introduces a systematic error, which is enhanced by a large ratio of Cabibbo-allowed to doubly Cabibbo-suppressed D decay amplitudes.
  • The flavor puzzle of the Standard Model is explained in split fermion models by having the fermions localized and separated in an extra dimension. Many of these models assume a certain profile for the Higgs VEV, usually uniform, or confined to a brane, without providing a dynamical realization for it. By studying the effect of the coupling between the Higgs and the localizer fields, we obtain these scenarios as results, rather than ansaetze. Moreover, we discuss other profiles and show that they are phenomenologically viable.
  • The observed flavor structure of the standard model arises naturally in "split fermion" models which localize fermions at different places in an extra dimension. It has, until now, been assumed that the bulk masses for such fermions can be chosen to be flavor diagonal simultaneously at every point in the extra dimension, with all the flavor violation coming from the Yukawa couplings to the Higgs. We consider the more natural possibility in which the bulk masses cannot be simultaneously diagonalized, that is, that they are twisted in flavor space. We show that, in general, this does not disturb the natural generation of hierarchies in the flavor parameters. Moreover, it is conceivable that all the flavor mixing and CP-violation in the standard model may come only from twisting, with the five-dimensional Yukawa couplings taken to be universal.