• Self-testing refers to a method with which a classical user can certify the state and measurements of quantum systems in a device-independent way. Especially, the self-testing of entangled states is of great importance in quantum information process. A comprehensible example is that violating the CHSH inequality maximally necessarily implies the bipartite shares a singlet. One essential question in self-testing is that, when one observes a non-maximum violation, how close is the tested state to the target state (which maximally violates certain Bell inequality)? The answer to this question describes the robustness of the used self-testing criterion, which is highly important in a practical sense. Recently, J. Kaniewski predicts two analytic self-testing bounds for bipartite and tripartite systems. In this work, we experimentally investigate these two bounds with high quality two-qubit and three-qubit entanglement sources. The results show that these bounds are valid for various of entangled states we prepared, and thus, we implement robust self-testing processes which improve the previous results significantly.
  • Detecting a change point is a crucial task in statistics that has been recently extended to the quantum realm. A source state generator that emits a series of single photons in a default state suffers an alteration at some point and starts to emit photons in a mutated state. The problem consists in identifying the point where the change took place. In this work, we consider a learning agent that applies Bayesian inference on experimental data to solve this problem. This learning machine adjusts the measurement over each photon according to the past experimental results finds the change position in an online fashion. Our results show that the local-detection success probability can be largely improved by using such a machine learning technique. This protocol provides a tool for improvement in many applications where a sequence of identical quantum states is required.
  • Photons propagating in Laguerre-Gaussian modes have characteristic orbital angular momentums, which are fundamental optical degrees of freedom. The orbital angular momentum of light has potential application in high capacity optical communication and even in quantum information processing. In this work, we experimentally construct a ring cavity with 4 lenses and 4 mirrors that is completely degenerate for Laguerre-Gaussian modes. By measuring the transmission peaks and patterns of different modes, the ring cavity is shown to supporting more than 31 Laguerre-Gaussian modes. The constructed degenerate cavity opens a new way for using the unlimited resource of available angular momentum states simultaneously.