• The magnetic field response of the Mott-insulating honeycomb iridate Na$_{2}$IrO$_{3}$ is investigated using torque magnetometry measurements in magnetic fields up to 60 tesla. A peak-dip structure is observed in the torque response at magnetic fields corresponding to an energy scale close to the zigzag ordering ($\approx 15~K$) temperature. Using exact diagonalization calculations, we show that such a distinctive signature in the torque response constrains the effective spin models for these classes of Kitaev materials to ones with dominant ferromagnetic Kitaev interactions, while alternative models with dominant antiferromagnetic Kitaev interactions are excluded. We further show that at high magnetic fields, long range spin correlation functions decay rapidly, signaling a transition to a long-sought-after field-induced quantum spin liquid beyond the peak-dip structure. Kitaev systems are thus revealed to be excellent candidates for field-induced quantum spin liquids, similar physics having been suggested in another Kitaev material $\alpha-$RuCl$_{3}$.
  • Large non-saturating magnetoresistance has been observed in various materials and electron-hole compensation has been regarded as one of the main mechanisms. Here we present a detailed study of angle-dependent Shubnikov-de Hass effect on large magnetoresistance material pyrite-type PtBi$_{2}$, which allows us to experimentally reconstruct its Fermi-surface structure and extract physical properties of each pocket. We find its Fermi surface contains four types of pockets in the Brillouin zone: three ellipsoid-like hole pockets $\alpha$ with c4 symmetry located on the edges (M points), one intricate electron pocket $\beta$ merged from four ellipsoids along [111] located on the corners (R points), two smooth and cambered octahedrons $\gamma$ (electron) and $\delta$ (hole) on the center ($\Gamma$ point). The deduced carrier densities of electrons and holes from the volume of pockets prove nearly perfect compensation. This compensation at low temperatures is also supported by our two bands by fitting field-dependence of Hall and magnetoresistance at different temperatures. We conclude that the compensation is the main mechanism for the large non-saturating magnetoresistance in pyrite-type PtBi$_{2}$. We found the hole pockets $\alpha$ may contribute major mobility because of their light masses and anisotropy to avoid large-angle scattering at low temperature, may point to common features of semimetals with large magnetoresistance. The found and sub-quadratic magnetoresistance is probably due to field-dependent mobilities induced by long-range disorders, another feature of semimetal under high magnetic fields.
  • Large unsaturated magnetoresistance has been recently reported in numerous semi-metals. Many of them have a topologically non-trivial band dispersion, such as Weyl nodes or lines. Here, we show that elemental antimony displays the largest high-field magnetoresistance among all known semi-metals. We present a detailed study of the angle-dependent magnetoresistance and use a semi-classical framework invoking an anisotropic mobility tensor to fit the data. A slight deviation from perfect compensation and a modest variation with magnetic field of the components of the mobility tensor are required to attain perfect fits at arbitrary strength and orientation of magnetic field in the entire temperature window of study. Our results demonstrate that large orbital magnetoresistance is an unavoidable consequence of low carrier concentration and the sub-quadratic magnetoresistance seen in many semi-metals can be attributed to field-dependent mobility, expected whenever the disorder length-scale exceeds the Fermi wavelength.
  • Non-collinear antiferromagnets can host a large anomalous Hall effect (AHE), as demonstrated in the case of Mn$_{3}$X (X= Sn, Ge). Weyl nodes in the electronic dispersions are believed to cause this AHE. Their locus in the momentum space is yet to be pinned down. Here we show that in Mn$_{3}$Sn crystals in the presence of a moderate magnetic field, spin texture sets the orientation of the $k$-space Berry curvature, and the in-plane anisotropy due to the hexagonal Brillouin zone and Fermi surface is vanishingly small. The measured threshold magnetic field for domain nucleation points to a remarkably large energy cost for building domain walls. In the multidomain regime restricted to a narrow field window, these walls generate real-space Berry curvature, pointing to a non-trivial texture with a non-coplanar component and reminiscent of the skyrmion lattice in MnSi. In contrast to the latter case, the real-space component constitutes a sizeable fraction of the total anomalous Hall conductivity.
  • In this paper, we first review fundamental aspects of magnetoresistance in multi-valley systems based on the semiclassical theory. Then we will review experimental evidence and theoretical understanding of magnetoresistance in an archetypal multi-valley system, where the electric conductivity is set by the sum of the contributions of different valleys. Bulk bismuth has three valleys with an extremely anisotropic effective mass. As a consequence, the magnetoconductivity in each valley is extremely sensitive to the orientation of the magnetic field. Therefore, a rotating magnetic field plays the role of a valley valve tuning the contribution of each valley to the total conductivity. In addition to this simple semi-classical effect, other phenomena arise in the high-field limit as a consequence of an intricate Landau spectrum. In the vicinity of the quantum limit, the orientation of magnetic field significantly affects the distribution of carriers in each valley, namely, the valley polarization is induced by the magnetic field. Moreover, experiment has found that well beyond the quantum limit, one or two valleys become totally empty. This is the only case in condensed-matter physics where a Fermi sea is completely dried up by a magnetic field without a metal-insulator transition. There have been two long-standing problems on bismuth near the quantum limit: the large anisotropic Zeeman splitting of holes, and the extra peaks in quantum oscillations, which cannot be assigned to any known Landau levels. These problems are solved by taking into account the interband effect due to the spin-orbit couplings for the former, and the contributions from the twinned crystal for the latter. Up to here, the whole spectrum can be interpreted within the one-particle theory. Finally, we will discuss transport and thermodynamic signatures of breaking of the valley symmetry in this system.
  • We present a study of electric, thermal and thermoelectric response in noncollinear antiferromagnet Mn$_{3}$Sn, which hosts a large Anomalous Hall Effect (AHE). Berry curvature generates off-diagonal thermal(Righi-Leduc) and thermoelectric(Nernst) signals, which are detectable at room temperature and invertible with a small magnetic field. The thermal and electrical Hall conductivities respect the Wiedemann-Franz law, implying that the transverse currents induced by Berry curvature are carried by Fermi surface quasi-particles. In contrast to conventional ferromagnets, the anomalous Lorenz number remains close to the Sommerfeld number over the whole temperature range of study, excluding any contribution by inelastic scattering and pointing to Berry curvature as the unique source of AHE. The anomalous off-diagonal thermo-electric and Hall conductivities are strongly temperature-dependent and their ratio is close to k$_{B}$/e.
  • The Fermi surface of elemental bismuth consists of three small rotationally equivalent electron pockets, offering a valley degree of freedom to charge carriers. A relatively small magnetic field can confine electrons to their lowest Landau level. This is the quantum limit attained in other dilute metals upon application of sufficiently strong magnetic field. Here, we report on the observation of another threshold magnetic field never encountered before in any other solid. Above this field, $B_{\rm{empty}}$, one or two valleys become totally empty. Drying up a Fermi sea by magnetic field in the Brillouin zone leads to a manyfold enhancement in electric conductance. We trace the origin of the large drop in magnetoresistance across $B_{\rm{empty}}$ to transfer of carriers between valleys with highly anisotropic mobilities. The non-interacting picture of electrons with field-dependent mobility explains most results. Coulomb interaction may play a role in shaping the fine details.
  • The advent of nodal-line semi-metals, i.e. systems in which the conduction and valence bands cross each other along a closed trajectory (line or loop) inside the Brillouin zone, has opened up a new arena for the exploration of topological condensed matter in which, due to a vanishing density of states near the Fermi level, electron correlation effects may also play an important role. In spite of this conceptual richness however, material realization of nodal-line (loop) fermions is rare, with PbTaSe2, ZrSiS and PtSn4 the only promising known candidates. Here we report the synthesis and physical properties of a new compound PdSn4 that is isostructural with PtSn4 yet possesses quasiparticles with significantly enhanced effective masses. In addition, PdSn4 displays an unusual polar angular magnetoresistance which at a certain field orientation, varies linearly with field up to 55 Tesla. Our study suggests that, in association with its homologue PtSn4 whose low-lying excitations were recently claimed to possess Dirac node arcs, PdSn4 may be a promising candidate in the search for novel topological states with enhanced correlation effects.
  • We report measurements of the upper critical field $H_{\mathrm{c2}}$ as functions of temperature $T$, polar angle $\theta$ (of the field direction with respect to the crystallographic $c$ axis), and azimuthal angle $\phi$ (of the field direction relative to the $a$ axis within the $ab$ plane) for the Cr-based superconductor K$_{2}$Cr$_{3}$As$_{3}$ with a quasi-one-dimensional and non-centrosymmetric crystal structure. We confirm that the anisotropy in $H_{\mathrm{c2}}(T)$ becomes inverse with decreasing temperature. At low temperatures, $H_{\mathrm{c2}}(\theta)$ data are featured by two maxima at $\theta$ = 0 ($\mathbf{H}\parallel c$) and $\pi/2$ ($\mathbf{H}\bot c$), which can be quantitatively understood only if uniaxial effective-mass anisotropy and absence of Pauli paramagnetic effect for $\mathbf{H}\bot c$ are taken simultaneously into consideration. The in-plane $H_{\mathrm{c2}}(\phi)$ profile shows a unique threefold modulation especially at low temperatures. Overall, the characteristic of the $H_{\mathrm{c2}}(\theta, \phi, T)$ data mostly resemble those of the heavy-fermion superconductor UPt$_3$, and we argue in favor of a dominant spin-triplet superconductivity with odd parity in K$_{2}$Cr$_{3}$As$_{3}$.
  • For both electron- and hole-doped cuprates, superconductivity appears in the vicinity of suppressed broken symmetry order, suggesting that quantum criticality plays a vital role in the physics of these systems. A confounding factor in identifying the role of quantum criticality in the electron-doped systems is the competing influence of chemical doping and oxygen stoichiometry. Using high quality thin films of Pr$_{2}$CuO$_{4\pm\delta}$, we tune superconductivity and uncover the influence of quantum criticality without Ce substitution. We observe magnetic quantum oscillations that are consistent with the presence of small hole-like Fermi surface pockets, and a large mass enhancement near the suppression of superconductivity. Tuning these materials using only oxygen stoichiometry allows the observation of quantum oscillations and provides a new axis with which to explore the physics underlying the electron-doped side of the cuprate phase diagram.
  • The ratio of the Zeeman splitting to the cyclotron energy ($M=\Delta E_{\rm Z}/\hbar \omega_{\rm c}$) for hole-like carriers in bismuth has been quantified with a great precision by many experiments performed during the past five decades. It exceeds 2 when the magnetic field is along the trigonal axis and vanishes in the perpendicular configuration. Theoretically, however, $M$ is expected to be isotropic and equal to unity in a two-band Dirac model. We argue that a solution to this half-a-century-old puzzle can be found by extending the $k\cdot p$ theory to multiple bands. Our model not only gives a quantitative account of magnitude and anisotropy of $M$ for hole-like carriers in bismuth, but also explains its contrasting evolution with antimony doping pressure, both probed by new experiments reported here. The present results have important implications for the magnitude and anisotropy of $M$ in other systems with strong spin-orbit coupling.
  • Development of new, high quality functional materials has been at the forefront of condensed matter research. The recent advent of two-dimensional black phosphorus has greatly enriched the material base of two-dimensional electron systems. Significant progress has been made to achieve high mobility black phosphorus two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) since the development of the first black phosphorus field-effect transistors (FETs)$^{1-4}$. Here, we reach a milestone in developing high quality black phosphorus 2DEG - the observation of integer quantum Hall (QH) effect. We achieve high quality by embedding the black phosphorus 2DEG in a van der Waals heterostructure close to a graphite back gate; the graphite gate screens the impurity potential in the 2DEG, and brings the carrier Hall mobility up to 6000 $cm^{2}V^{-1}s^{-1}$. The exceptional mobility enabled us, for the first time, to observe QH effect, and to gain important information on the energetics of the spin-split Landau levels in black phosphorus. Our results set the stage for further study on quantum transport and device application in the ultrahigh mobility regime.
  • We report on the quasi-linear in field intrachain magnetoresistance in the normal state of a quasi-one-dimensional superconductor Ta$_4$Pd$_3$Te$_{16}$ ($T_c$$\sim$4.6 K). Both the longitudinal and transverse in-chain magnetoresistance shows a power-law dependence, $\Delta \rho$$\propto$B$^\alpha$, with the exponent $\alpha$ close to 1 over a wide temperature and field range. The magnetoresistance shows no sign of saturation up to 50 tesla studied. The linear magnetoresistance observed in Ta$_4$Pd$_3$Te$_{16}$ is found to be overall inconsistent with the interpretations based on the Dirac fermions in the quantum limit, charge conductivity fluctuations as well as quantum electron-electron interference. Moreover, it is observed that the Kohler's rule, regardless of the field orientations, is violated in its normal state. This result suggests the loss of charge carriers in the normal state of this chain-containing compound, due presumably to the charge-density-wave fluctuations.
  • We present a study of angle-resolved quantum oscillations of electric and thermoelectric transport coefficients in semi-metallic WTe$_{2}$, which has the particularity of displaying a large B$^{2}$ magneto-resistance. The Fermi surface consists of two pairs of electron-like and hole-like pockets of equal volumes in a "Russian doll" structure. Carrier density, Fermi energy, mobility and the mean-free-path of the system are quantified. An additional frequency is observed above a threshold field and attributed to magnetic breakdown across two orbits. In contrast to all other dilute metals, the Nernst signal remains linear in magnetic field even in the high-field ($\omega_c\tau \gg 1$) regime. Surprisingly, none of the pockets extend across the c-axis of the first Brillouin zone, making the system a three-dimensional metal with moderate anisotropy in Fermi velocity yet a large anisotropy in mean-free-path.
  • The origin of superconductivity in bulk SrTiO$_{3}$ is a mystery, since the non-monotonous variation of the critical transition with carrier concentration defies the expectations of the crudest version of the BCS theory. Here, employing the Nernst effect, an extremely sensitive probe of tiny bulk Fermi surfaces, we show that down to concentrations as low as $5.5 \times 10^{17}cm^{-3}$, the system has both a sharp Fermi surface and a superconducting ground state. The most dilute superconductor currently known has therefore a metallic normal state with a Fermi energy as little as 1.1 meV on top of a band gap as large as 3 eV. Occurrence of a superconducting instability in an extremely small, single-component and barely anisotropic Fermi surface implies strong constraints for the identification of the pairing mechanism.
  • The Landau spectrum of bismuth is complex and includes many angle-dependent lines in the extreme quantum limit. The adequacy of single-particle theory to describe this spectrum in detail has been an open issue. Here, we present a study of angle-resolved Nernst effect in bismuth, which maps the angle-resolved Landau spectrum for the entire solid angle up to 28 T. The experimental map is in good agreement with the results of a theoretical model with parabolic dispersion for holes and an extended Dirac Hamiltonian for electrons. The angular dependence of additional lines in the Landau spectrum allows to uncover the mystery of their origin. They correspond to the lines expected for the hole Landau levels in a secondary crystal tilted by 108 degrees, the angle between twinned crystals in bismuth. According to our results, the electron reservoirs of the two identical tilted crystals have different chemical potentials and carriers across the twin boundary have different concentrations. An exceptional feature of this junction is that it separates two electron-hole compensated reservoirs. The link between this edge singularity and the states wrapping a three-dimensional electron gas in the quantum limit emerges as an outstanding open question.
  • Electrons are offered a valley degree of freedom in presence of particular lattice structures. Manipulating valley degeneracy is the subject matter of an emerging field of investigation, mostly focused on charge transport in graphene. In bulk bismuth, electrons are known to present a threefold valley degeneracy and a Dirac dispersion in each valley. Here we show that because of their huge in-plane mass anisotropy, a flow of Dirac electrons along the trigonal axis is extremely sensitive to the orientation of in-plane magnetic field. Thus, a rotatable magnetic field can be used as a valley valve to tune the contribution of each valley to the total conductivity. According to our measurements, charge conductivity by carriers of a single valley can exceed four-fifth of the total conductivity in a wide range of temperature and magnetic field. At high temperature and low magnetic field, the three valleys are interchangeable and the three-fold symmetry of the underlying lattice is respected. As the temperature lowers and/or the magnetic field increases, this symmetry is spontaneously lost. The latter may be an experimental manifestation of the recently proposed valley-nematic Fermi liquid state.
  • In elemental bismuth, emptying the low-index Landau levels is accompanied by giant Nernst quantum oscillations. The Nernst response sharply peaks each time a Landau level intersects the chemical potential. By studying the evolution of these peaks when the field rotates in three perpendicular planes defined by three high-symmetry axes, we have mapped the angle-resolved Landau spectrum of the system up to 12 T. A theoretical model treating electrons at L point with an extended Dirac Hamiltonian is confronted with the experimentally-resolved spectrum. We obtain a set of theoretical parameters yielding a good but imperfect agreement between theory and experiment for all orientations of the magnetic field in space. The results confirm the relevance of the Dirac spectrum to the electron pockets and settle the longstanding uncertainty about the magnitude of the g-factor for holes. According to our analysis, a magnetic field exceeding 2.5 T applied along the bisectrix axis puts all carriers of the three electron pockets in their lowest($j=0$) spin-polarized Landau level. On top of this complex angle-dependent spectrum, experiment detects additional and unexpected Nernst peaks of unidentified origin.
  • We report on a study of the Nernst effect in graphite extended up to 45 T. The Nernst response sharply peaks each time a Landau tube is squeezed inside the thermally fuzzy Fermi surface and presents a temperature-independent fixed point whenever the tube flattens to a single ring. Beyond the quantum limit, the onset of the field-induced phase transition leads to a drastic drop in the Nernst response signaling the sudden vanishing of Landau tubes. The magnitude of this drop suggests the destruction of multiple Landau tubes possibly as a result of simultaneous nesting of the electron and hole pockets.
  • With a widely available magnetic field of 10 T, one can attain the quantum limit in bismuth and graphite. At zero magnetic field, these two elemental semi-metals host a dilute liquid of carriers of both signs. When the quantum limit is attained, all quasi-particles are confined to a few Landau tubes. Each time a Landau tube is squeezed before definitely leaving the Fermi surface, the Nernst response sharply peaks. In bismuth, additional Nernst peaks, unexpected in the non-interacting picture, are resolved beyond the quantum limit. The amplitude of these unexpected Nernst peaks is larger in the samples with the longest electron mean-free-path.
  • Elemental bismuth provides a rare opportunity to explore the fate of a three-dimensional gas of highly mobile electrons confined to their lowest Landau level. Coulomb interaction, neglected in the band picture, is expected to become significant in this extreme quantum limit with poorly understood consequences. Here, we present a study of the angular-dependent Nernst effect in bismuth, which establishes the existence of ultraquantum field scales on top of its complex single-particle spectrum. Each time a Landau level crosses the Fermi level, the Nernst response sharply peaks. All such peaks are resolved by the experiment and their complex angular-dependence is in very good agreement with the theory. Beyond the quantum limit, we resolve additional Nernst peaks signaling a cascade of additional Landau sub-levels caused by electron interaction.
  • The thermopower and Nernst effect were investigated for undoped parent compounds LaFeAsO and LaNiAsO. Both thermopower and Nernst signal in iron-based LaFeAsO are significantly larger than those in nickel-based LaNiAsO. Furthermore, abrupt changes in both thermopower and Nernst effect are observed below the structural phase transition temperature and spin-density wave (SDW) type antiferromagnetic (AFM) order temperature in Fe-based LaFeAsO. On the other hand, Nernst effect is very small in the Ni-based LaNiAsO and it is weakly temperature-dependent, reminiscent of the case in normal metals. We suggest that the effect of SDW order on the spin scattering rate should play an important role in the anomalous temperature dependence of Hall effect and Nernst effect in LaFeAsO. The contrast behavior between the LaFeAsO and LaNiAsO systems implies that the LaFeAsO system is fundamentally different from the LaNiAsO system and this may provide clues to the mechanism of high $T_c$ superconductivity in the Fe-based systems.
  • Nernst effect, the transverse voltage generated by a longitudinal thermal gradient in presence of magnetic field has recently emerged as a very sensitive, yet poorly understood, probe of electron organization in solids. Here we report on an experiment on graphite, a macroscopic stack of graphene layers, which establishes a fundamental link between dimensionality of an electronic system and its Nernst response. In sharp contrast with single-layer graphene, the Nernst signal sharply peaks whenever a Landau level meets the Fermi level. This points to the degrees of freedom provided by finite interlayer coupling as a source of enhanced thermoelectric response in the vicinity of the quantum limit. Since Landau quantization slices a three-dimensional Fermi surface, each intersection of a Landau level with the Fermi level modifies the Fermi surface topology. According to our results, the most prominent signature of such a topological phase transition emerges in the transverse thermoelectric response.
  • In contrast to almost all anisotropic superconductors, the upper critical field of URu$_{2}$Si$_{2}$ is larger when the field is oriented along the less conducting direction. We present a study of resistivity and Seebeck coefficient extended down to sub-Kelvin temperature range uncovering a singular case of anisotropy. When the current is injected along the c-axis URu$_{2}$Si$_{2}$ behaves as a low-density Fermi liquid. When it flows along the a-axis, even in presence of a large field, resistivity remains T-linear down to T$_{c}$ and the Seebeck coefficient undergoes a sign change at very low temperatures. We conclude that the characteristic energy scale is anisotropic and vanishingly small in the basal plane.
  • We present a systematic study on the physical properties of EuFe$_{2-x}$Ni$_{x}$As$_{2}$ (0$\leq$\emph{x}$\leq$0.2) by electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility and thermopower measurements. The undoped compound EuFe$_{2}$As$_{2}$ undergoes a spin-density-wave (SDW) transition associated with Fe moments at 195 K, followed by antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering of Eu$^{2+}$ moments at 20 K. Ni doping at the Fe site simultaneously suppresses the SDW transition and AFM ordering of Eu$^{2+}$ moments. For $x\geq$0.06, the magnetic ordering of Eu$^{2+}$ moments evolves from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic (FM). The SDW transition is completely suppressed for $x\geq$0.16, however, no superconducting transition was observed down to 2 K. The possible origins of the AFM-to-FM transition and the absence of superconductivity in EuFe$_{2-x}$Ni$_{x}$As$_{2}$ system are discussed.